Mexican Chicken Stuffed Peppers | The Paleo Diet®
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Mexican Chicken Stuffed Peppers

By The Paleo Diet Team
January 16, 2016
Mexican Chicken Stuffed Peppers image

It's International Spicy Food Day and we're heating things up with a recipe from our new cookbook, Real Paleo Fast & Easy. Our Mexican Chicken Stuffed Peppers are colorful crowd-pleasers that will satisfy everyone's spicy cravings!

Tip: Blanching the pepper halves in boiling water for a couple minutes keeps them crisp enough to hold the hearty filling but soft enough to eat—without having to bake them in the oven.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 medium jalapeño or serrano chile, seeded and chopped
  • 2 pounds ground uncooked chicken or turkey
  • 2 tablespoons Mexican Seasoning (recipe below)
  • 1 14.5 ounce can no-salt-added fire-roasted diced tomatoes
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 4 medium red, yellow, and/or orange sweet peppers
  • Lime wedges

Instructions:

In a large skillet heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, and chile; cook and stir 2 minutes. Add ground chicken; cook until no longer pink. Sprinkle with Mexican Seasoning; stir well. Stir in undrained tomatoes. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, 5 to 7 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated. Stir in ¼ cup of the cilantro.

Meanwhile, cut sweet peppers in half vertically (from stems to bottoms). Remove and discard stems, seeds, and membranes. In a large pot blanch peppers in boiling water 2 to 3 minutes or just until tender; drain. Fill peppers with chicken mixture.

For each serving, arrange 2 pepper halves on a plate. Sprinkle with the remaining cilantro and serve with lime wedges.

Serves 4

Mexican Seasoning Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon cumin seeds
  • 4 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon preservative-free granulated garlic
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ to 1 teaspoon ground chipotle pepper or cayenne pepper (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground saffron

Mexican Seasoning Instructions

In a dry small skillet toast cumin seeds over medium-low heat 1 to 2 minutes or until fragrant, shaking skillet occasionally. Remove from heat; cool 2 minutes. Transfer seeds to a spice grinder; grind to a powder. Transfer cumin to a small bowl. Stir in paprika, garlic, oregano, chipotle pepper (if using), cinnamon, and saffron. Store in an airtight container at room temperature up to 6 months. Stir or shake before using. Makes about ¼ cup.

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