The Paleo Diet's Stance on Protein | The Paleo Diet®
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The Paleo Diet October 2020 Digest - Protein

By The Paleo Diet Team
October 31, 2020
The Paleo Diet October 2020 Digest - Protein image

Protein is an essential part of the human diet; proteins serve countless functions in our body including carrying oxygen in the blood, building muscle, forming antibodies, and regulating chemical reactions. Protein is made up of amino acids. Out of the many amino acids that our bodies need, nine are considered "essential," meaning we can only procure them from food.

For most of human history, protein was sourced primarily from meat. Animal sources such as beef, poultry, and fish are considered “complete proteins” because they contain all nine of the essential amino acids.

While humans are scientifically suggested to be omnivores, as argued by new science writer Raphael Sirtoli, popular diets today such as the carnivore diet and vegetarian and veganism have encouraged people to digest either too much or too little animal protein.

Therefore, October’s theme was centered around protein. Our chief science officer, Dr. Mark J. Smith, offers a comparison of animal proteins, including eggs, to plant-based proteins. We also expand on the health risks of overconsuming protein, provide tips on how to get enough protein from plant foods, and suggest what foods can replace the protein powerhouse, eggs, if you’re allergic.

At The Paleo Diet®, we recognize the nutritional community has varying opinions when it comes to some sources of protein such as red meat and eggs. We tackle these topics as we do everything, by referencing the science. We also address common myths about protein.

Finally, we have two recipes this month. First, a protein-packed breakfast casserole, so you can start your day off strong. Then a true Paleo dish of wild game chili.

We hope you enjoy!     

- The Paleo Diet Team 


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Battle of the Proteins: Comparing Plant and Animal Sources

By Dr. Mark J Smith

We analyze the importance of protein in humans' diet and compare the amino acid profile of animal and plant-based proteins, as a guideline to the best sources.


October's Theme: Protein Sources

Kateryna T/Unsplash.com Kateryna T/Unsplash.com

The Best Plant-Based Proteins

By Elisabeth Kwak

Vegetarians may find it hard to get enough protein in their diet, and the challenge can increase when they are also Paleo. While plants do not stack up against meat, it’s still possible to get all the amino acids you need, especially if you eat a variety of nuts, seeds, and green vegetables.

Mama_mia/ Shutterstock.com Mama_mia/ Shutterstock.com

What Science Really Says about Eggs and Heart Disease?

By Aimee McNew

There are few foods that spark more health arguments than eggs. The Paleo Diet is here to set the record straight. As a good source of healthy fat and protein, they’re a Paleo Diet staple with many health benefits, when eaten in moderation.

Tatjana Baibakova/ Shutterstock.com Tatjana Baibakova/ Shutterstock.com

Are humans carnivores? The evolution of our place in the food web

By Raphael Sirtoli

To understand the diet that modern humans have evolved to eat, we need to study the diet, position in the food chain, and anatomy of our ancestors.

Timolina/ Shutterstock.com Timolina/ Shutterstock.com

Nell’s Corner: Three Protein Myths You Might Still Believe

By Nell Stephenson

Is grass-fed meat the same as conventionally raised meat? Is there a limit on the amount of protein you should be eating every day? Can you get enough protein as a vegan? Paleoista Nell Stephenson debunks common misconceptions about protein.

Creatus/Shutterstock.com Creatus/Shutterstock.com

Protein, Fasting, and the mTOR Pathway

By David Whiteside

In the case of protein, too much of a good thing can be bad. Overconsuming protein can activate a metabolic sensing mechanism in our cells called the mTOR pathway. Some researchers associate the mTOR pathway with increased risks of cancer and shortened lifespan. There has been some research to show that fasting can help counterbalance this phenomenon.

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How to be Paleo When You Can’t Eat Eggs

By Aimee McNew

While eggs are nutritional powerhouses, they’re not for everyone. In fact, eggs are the second most recurrent food allergen. Fortunately, there are other ways to get healthy fat and protein on the Paleo Diet such as almonds, salmon, and jerky, to name a few.

ESB Professional/ Shutterstock.com ESB Professional/ Shutterstock.com

Is it Okay to Eat Red Meat? The Debate Rages On

By Casey Thaler

Any recommendation in the nutrition world will almost always have some implicit bias. While some experts argue red meat is good for you, others claim it has adverse health benefits. These adversaries, however, only look at processed meats. Grass-fed, high quality red meat, on the other hand, is good for you.

Recipe: Protein-Packed Breakfast Casserole

By Jennafer Ashley

Start your day off right with this tasty breakfast casserole that combines all the best sources of protein: meat, eggs, and vegetables like spinach. Plus, it’s completely customizable to your taste preferences.

The Paleo Diet October 2020 Digest - Protein image

Recipe: Wild Game Chili

By The Paleo Diet Team

Fresh game meat is high in protein, low in calories, and filled with vitamins and minerals from its natural, additive-free diet. Try this venison loin and ground bison chili cooked in beef broth and red wine with fresh cilantro, scallions, and lime for the ultimate Paleo meal.


November at The Paleo Diet: The Importance of Balance

A common misconception about the Paleo Diet is that it can be too strict and that there are too many nutritional ratios to follow.

This, however, is not true. While we want to inform our readers about the importance of macronutrient ratios such as sodium verse potassium, omega-3 versus omega-6 fatty acids, and magnesium versus calcium, following a Paleo Diet naturally balances these for you.

Plus, our “85/15 Rule” suggests you eat Paleo meals 85 percent of the time—you’ll still reap most of its health benefits.

In order to break down this stereotype, November is all about balance. We’ll touch upon more than just your diet though, and discuss many aspects of life, like stress management.

As always, our team appreciates your support of The Paleo Diet. We look forward to and encourage your feedback on our website and Facebook!   

Thanks! 

The Paleo Diet Team 

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