Search Results for: diabetes

Diabetes researchers still recommend pills and surgery instead of a healthy diet

Paleo devotees are still waiting for mainstream nutritional science to recognize the demonstrated, profound anti-diabetic effects of their nutrient-dense, naturally low-carbohydrate diet. Unfortunately, based on a recent meta-analysis by Professor Nita Forouhi et al [1] that surveyed diet-based diabetes therapies, they will have to wait a bit longer. Researchers have once again sidestepped Ancestral living in favor of pills, surgery and “crash” dieting. Part One of this series examined the study which showed a clear bias toward Western dietary norms, and concluded that weight loss is the best therapy for diabetes—based on bariatric surgery results.   Forouhi et al explored

New Diabetes Study: Nutritional Researchers Still Divided on Diet-Based Approaches Part 1

Paleo dieters often wonder when the rest of the world will catch up. Most of all, they wonder when mainstream nutritional science will finally validate what they experience every day: safe and natural weight loss; freedom from chronic illness; vibrant energy all day long. But mainstream nutritional researchers remain divided on basic diet and health issues and many factors inhibit progress—especially toward understanding non-conventional approaches like Paleo. Freighted with years of conventional wisdom, torn by conflicting agendas, and (like scientists in all disciplines) too frequently impervious to new ideas, these savants often run in place. Covering new ground sometimes only

Paleolithic Diet is the Best Bet for Diabetes

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Paleolithic Diet is the Best Bet for Diabetes Excerpt

A newly published study in Cardiovascular Diabetologycompared the effects of a Paleolithic diet to the current guidelines for a diabetes diet, and looked at cardiovascular risk factors for type 2 diabetes patients. The participating three women and ten men, who had type 2 diabetes that was not treated with insulin, were instructed to follow each diet for three-months.

The Paleolithic diet used was lower in cereals and dairy products, and higher in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs. It was also higher in unsaturated fatty acids, dietary cholesterol and several vitamins. It was lower in total energy, energy density, carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load (GL) and glycemic index (GI), saturated fatty acids and calcium.

Cow’s Milk and Type 1 Diabetes

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Cow’s Milk and Type 1 Diabetes Excerpt

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease, in which immune cells (T-lymphocytes) mount an attack to the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin (beta cells), resulting in its destruction. As so, these patients have to rely on insulin replacement therapy to live. Although this disease has a genetic predisposition, as it happens with other auto-immune diseases, the interaction between one’s genotype and several environmental factors play a major role. In the last 20 years, several dietary factors have been implicated in T1D, such as cow’s milk consumption, vitamin D insufficiency and exposure to gluten (a group of proteins in a number of cereals, especially wheat, rye and barley) in early life.

Can You “Out-Sprint” Type-2 Diabetes?

Our Paleolithic ancestors had to sprint to survive; to fend off predators or to hunt their prey. The “fight or flight” response (and thus sprinting) is one of our most primal survival mechanisms. It’s hardwired into our DNA. Today, we’ve unfortunately outsourced most of our daily movement to cars, trains, and escalators, and we remain sedentary most of the day. Our bodies adapted to this frequent high-intensity fight or flight response and may very well have learned to need it. Today, most people simply don’t get enough movement in their day and it comes at a steep cost for your

Fasting – Ancestral Cure For Diabetes?

Today, we are bombarded with high-calorie foods; sweetened coffee, sugary drinks, processed snacks, and convenience food. This environment of caloric excess is at odds with our evolutionary past. In combination with our modern sedentary lifestyle, this sets us up for obesity, type II diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Our hunter-gatherer ancestors did not eat three meals a day, nor did they snack at regular intervals. Their eating patterns would regularly involve intermittent periods of reduced food (energy) intake.1 Now, some in the science community are saying that mimicking this intermittent fasting could be a simple, convenient, and cost-effective ancestral strategy

Metabolic and Physiologic Effects from Consuming a Hunter-Gatherer (Paleolithic) Diet in Type 2 Diabetes

A Healthy Diet With and Without Cereal Grains and Dairy Products in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Estimates of Net Acid Production Do Not Predict Measured Net Acid Excretion inType 2 Diabetes Patients on Paleolithic Diets

Subjective Satiety and Other Experiences of a Paleolithic Diet Compared to a Diabetes Diet in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

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