Red Meat, Insulin Sensitivity, and Sage Infused Mushroom Paleo Burgers

Red Meat, Insulin Sensitivity, and Sage Infused Mushroom Paleo Burgers | The Paleo Diet

Does red meat consumption increase your risk for developing type-2 diabetes? Some epidemiologic studies have suggested this much, while also linking increased dairy consumption with decreased type-2 diabetes risk.1 Insulin sensitivity is the proposed mechanism driving these associations.

People with low insulin sensitivity, also known as being insulin resistant, require greater amounts of insulin from the pancreas to stabilize blood glucose levels. Over time, insulin resistance promotes type-2 diabetes as the pancreas fails to satisfy the body’s insulin requirements. This causes excess glucose to build up in the bloodstream, thereby promoting type-2 diabetes.

Previously published epidemiological studies have led to the hypothesis that increased red meat consumption promotes lower insulin sensitivity, whereas increased dairy consumption promotes higher insulin sensitivity. This hypothesis, however, has not been tested via randomized controlled trials, until now.

For a study recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers tested three different diets on 47 overweight or obese men and women.2 The diets included a) a diet high in red meat with minimal dairy, b) a diet high in dairy with no red meat, and c) a diet with no red meat, nor any dairy. Each participant followed each diet for a period of four weeks.

Until now, few intervention studies have evaluated red meat and dairy for their effects on insulin sensitivity in the absence of weight loss. The researchers, therefore, designed this study to maintain weight stability so as to isolate the effects of red meat and dairy on insulin sensitivity. Their primary hypothesis was that the red meat diet would produce greater insulin resistance (lower insulin sensitivity) compared to the high-dairy diet.

To their surprise, the opposite happened. Fasting insulin was significantly higher after the high-dairy diet compared to the red meat diet. There was no change in fasting glucose, which means the high-dairy diet promoted greater insulin resistance (lower insulin sensitivity) than the red meat diet.

These findings run contrary to the hypothesis that red meat consumption increases your risk for type-2 diabetes. Red meat, as those who follow the Paleo lifestyle know, is an invaluable source of high-quality protein and fat, as well as various vitamins and minerals. Continue eating it and should you be short on inspiration, our Sage Infused Mushroom Burgers are an excellent place to start!

SAGE INFUSED MUSHROOM BURGERS

Ingredients

  • 1 lb lean ground beef
  • ¼ lb mushrooms
  • 2 tbsp fresh sage, chopped finely
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 4 tbsp olive oil, divided
  • Freshly milled black pepper

DIRECTIONS

sage-mushroom-burger5
1. Wash the mushrooms and chop them into quarters. 2. Place them on a baking sheet and roast at 350°F for 15 to 20 minutes, or until they reduce by half.
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Turner, KM, et al. (Mar 2015). Red meat, dairy, and insulin sensitivity: a randomized crossover intervention study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(3). Retrieved from //ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2015/03/25/ajcn.114.104976.abstract

[2] Ibid. Turner

About Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.Christopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

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“8” Comments

  1. I have battled my weight for years, again just recently I tried protien shakes, meats and veggies. I gained weight. I have had type 2 diabetes for 11 years, insulin dependent. A month ago I was diagnosed with hypothyroid. I would love to find a way to eat healthy and lose weight too. I am sure the Paleo way is good for Diabetics but what about for jump starting metabolism and eating for a healthy thyroid.

    • I have hypothyroid and have been eating according to the Paleo concept for more than 7 years.
      For me it didn’t change my T3/T4 levels at all, but I lost weight and are able to stay on my ideal weight without effort.
      Of course combined with staying physically active at least 30 min a day helps also.

      I noticed that you mention protein shakes, I think you should avoid that as all processed food should be avoided.

      • I had type 2 diabetes for 10 years, I was prescribed metforman. (steroid induced from lung infection…Dr. said lungs are great now but we gave you diabetes…Freak n’ Great!!! )I hated the poking and testing and the Pills that I heard horror stories about.
        I weighed 168 lbs @ 67 years old 5’1/2″. I decided to get off my butt and start exercising to see if I could get off the pills…and decided to go vegan and got a treadmill. In 10 months I lost 60 lbs. Half way through…I was off the medicine. and now I walk 14 Miles per day (2 hours in the am and 2 hours in the pm,and stick to my vegan diet and I weigh 104. I reward myself from time to time, and it’s OK. Since June 9th, (I got a garmin vivofit to keep track) I have almost 5 million steps logged on the garmin. That’s my story and it worked for me.

  2. Hi, Mike,

    I just want to say I am hoping a real expert responds to your plea here. I am not. But I am a skinny person by diet choice, and I have observed my blood sugar because I have to take a statin and it raises blood sugar, among its other fun effects.

    From my experience, you are on the right path, proteins and vegetables. Just watch even the vegetables, some have higher carbs than others, like carrots and beets, for example. Don’t get into the mindset of, all veggies are good.

    Hang in there! I’ll pray for you at mass tomorrow.

  3. This article concerns insulin sensitivity. I have the opposite problem. In the last few months I have been diagnosed with Reactive Hypoglycemia. My pancreas over produces insulin in reation to sugar. My brain shuts my body down and I basically pass out due to too much insulin while trying to recover or balance out again. My diet is now proteins and vegetables. Similar to this diet or way of eating. Honestly, I had a very poor diet before this started. It took over a year of problems to actually find out about this condition. I have been treated for seizures and stroke with nothing coming up abnormal. I am basically a healthy, active but overweight 56 year old man. Have you had any experience with Reactive Hypoglycemia? From what my doctors say there is nothing that can be done except learn to control it with diet. these lows oe passing out are happening almost everyday while trying to learn to control them. Thanks!

    • I might be able to help you a little. I have severe Hypoglycemia which includes reactive hypoglycemia. My pancreas overreacts, like yours, and slams me with insulin when I have anything over 14g of fast-acting sugar. A healthy diet of meat and veggies is great, but you need slow digesting sugars to help balance you out (otherwise you’ll have low blood sugar all of the time). Try adding some kind of whole grain to your diet. This has actually saved my life (quite literally) on multiple occasions. Since we over-produce insulin, we need to keep a little sugar in our bodies at all time to combat it. Whole grains digest slowly and release sugar in the intervals our bodies need to stay level and healthy.

      I also recommend getting a medical alert bracelet. I’m not sure if your reactive Hypoglycemia is as severe as my constant hypoglycemia, but if I pass out in public and someone calls an ambulance, the oral glucose gel they use to raise blood sugar can put me into a coma as soon as my pancreas reacts to it. The bracelet just lets them know that they need to give me a sandwich or piece of toast, not a huge dose of sugar!

      I hope this finds you (since it’s been a month since your original comment) and I hope you’ve gotten a better handle on your levels. It’s a pain in the butt, but you’ll feel normal soon!

  4. Pingback: Red Meat, Insulin Sensitivity, and Sage Infused Mushroom Paleo Burgers | Health Fitness Daily

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