Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On

Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On

Originally published August 30, 2015 on CJ Hunt Reports

There is a persistent belief (assumed to be true, even by prominent bloggers) repeated over and over again as if it’s fact – but, it’s not. In fact, this belief is sometimes used as a “logical” excuse for the author to include anything in their diet, and their diet recommendations, the author doesn’t want to stop eating. This belief is that early modern humans, our species, were such opportunists, and so desperate for food, that they would eat just about anything they could get their hands on. Not so.

Interestingly enough, early Moderns had very specific food preferences. As long as they could get those preferred foods, that’s what they ate. It was unnecessary for them to take advantage of what we now recognise as our species eventual survival strategy, our dietary “elasticity.” It is what sets us apart from other primates.

That survival strategy (dietary elasticity) in the specific example I’m about to share, would be the assumed expanding variety (diversity) of animal proteins they consumed from the day they hit the beach… just because it was there in the environment.

As some of you might know, just before the film was finished, and again while writing the companion book to the film last year, I went back to my first person scientific sources at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology to see what more, if anything, they had learned about the authentic human diet.

Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On | The Paleo Diet

Shannon McPherron Pic Courtesy Department of Human Evolution of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Professor Shannon McPherron (you met him in the Jonzac dig site sequence in the film) told me that the findings about our species diet in Jonzac, that early Modern Humans there ate primarily medium and large herbivores, were the very same findings Max Planck researchers and colleagues were discovering at dig sites all over the world.

Something I hadn’t really expected to hear as I was initially just interested in new information from Jonzac.

He also said there was some new information about the early modern human diet from one of his colleagues, Marcello Mannino, that might interest me revealing previously unknown information about our species dietary behaviour.

Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On | The Paleo Diet

Marcello Mannino Pic/Bio Courtesy Department of Human Evolution of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Marcello A. Mannino is a research scientist at the Department of Human Evolution where he collaborates in the management of the archaeological science laboratories. He is currently investigating human dietary change from the late Middle Palaeolithic, through the *Upper Palaeolithic and to the early Neolithic by means of stable isotope analyses on skeletal remains of Neanderthals and Modern Humans (*immediate time frame pre-agriculture which includes our species, early Modern humans).

Marcello started working at the Max Planck Institute after being awarded a Marie Curie Intra-European Research Fellowship for the project: Stable Isotope Ecology of Hunter-Gatherers in Italy in the Late Pleistocene and the Early Holocene.

Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On | The Paleo DietMarcello has a keen interest in, among other things, studying the reconstruction of past environments, subsistence, diet and mobility.

In this project Marcello and his colleagues did an isotopic analysisof remains they found in the Mediterranean to determine what we were eating when we first moved into that area.

This is what Marcello and his colleagues discovered.

Marine resources were not important foods in the diet of Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers – as we might have arbitrarily expected to be true.

Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On | The Paleo Diet

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So, what did they want when they first moved to the beach? They wanted what they were used to eating and preferred.

As Marcello and his coauthors concluded in the journal PLoS One, “Local hunter-gatherers did not develop strongly marine-oriented adaptations, such as those of their counterparts living on the Atlantic shores of Europe, but maintained essentially terrestrial-based strategies, similar to those of Late and Post-Glacial groups of the central and western Mediterranean.”

Again, why does this matter?

First, early Modern Humans preferred eating medium and large land animals whenever and wherever they could get them. This continues to be missed as an essential point about our species.

Think Again: Early Modern Humans Did Not Eat Anything They Could Get Their Hands On | The Paleo DietSecond, while we were smart and inherently able to expand our animal food sources when it was required, the human species did not eat anything that was in arm’s reach no matter what. That seems to be more of our species current dilemma. One we probably don’t want to model if we want the health and life we deserve.

These new hard science revelations are a real eye opener, and another good reason to keep digging deeper. To always be open, and actively look for new findings that tell us what is was that made us, modern humans, so special.  And, at least until plant agriculture took over, healthy.

What I like to say to myself when hard sciences reveal new details about our shared human story is it’s time to “think again.”

What do you think?

 

REFERENCES

Article Source: Origin and Diet of the Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers on the Mediterranean Island of Favignana (Islands, Sicily)

NY Times: “Mediterranean Settlers Had Little Taste for Fish”

About CJ Hunt

CJ HuntCJ Hunt is the writer, producer and host of the break out film hit THE PERFECT HUMAN DIET, #1 independent film, #1 documentary film, top ten movie iTunes USA/Canada and #1 Amazon VOD Jan 2013. Graduating Summa Cum Laude in Electronic Communication Arts BA Radio /TV from SFSU 2007, CJ has had a career that spanned motocross racing and theme park announcer to over 20 years in broadcasting, with voice-overs, TV host, television and movie actor and author of two previous books on diet and nutrition.

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“2” Comments

  1. Interesting theory.

    I think digestive enzymes indicate that the ability to eat carbohydrates 2 million years ago drove the split-off of hominids from old world primates. The enzymes are DPPIV and zonulin.

    This is strange territory. DPPIV allowed hominids to slowly digest carbohydrates. Carbohydrates caused population explosions. Conklin exposed communicable diseases to hominid DNA, causing epidemics and population thinnng.

    But some hominids survived these epidemics by eating meat and fat. The meat and fat allowed survivor hominids to exogenate the pathogens, and code around them.

    Modern humans exhibit vast adaptations over our primate ancestors. Only such a scenario would allow such rapid advancement.

    E-mail me if you are interested.

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