Tag Archives: zucchini

Chicken Mushroom Ramen | The Paleo DietIt’s National Soup Month and we’re celebrating with this mouthwatering recipe from our new cookbook, Real Paleo Fast & Easy. This warming, aromatic bowl of goodness proves that even Paleo enthusiasts can enjoy a big soupy bowl of Asian-style noodles. This noodle bowl is so fresh and delicious, you won’t miss the grain based variety a bit.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium zucchini
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken thighs
  • 1 teaspoon salt-free Chinese five-spice powder
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 8 cups unsalted chicken stock
  • 1 1-inch piece ginger, peeled and cut into matchstick-size pieces
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
  • 5 ounces fresh baby spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2 hard-cooked eggs, halved lengthwise
  • Sliced scallions
  • Crushed red pepper (optional)

Instructions

To make zucchini noodles, use a julienne slicer or spiralizer to cut zucchini into thin slices. Set zucchini noodles aside.

Preheat broiler. Rub chicken thighs with five-spice powder; sprinkle with black pepper. Place chicken thighs on a foil-lined baking sheet. Broil 4 to 5 inches from the heat 8 to 10 minutes or until done (175°F), turning once halfway through broiling. Let stand 10 minutes. Slice chicken and set aside.

Meanwhile, in a large saucepan combine stock, ginger, and garlic. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Add mushrooms; simmer, uncovered, 2 minutes. Add zucchini noodles; simmer 1 minute. Remove saucepan from heat. Add spinach; stir just until wilted. Stir in chicken.

Divide among four bowls; top with hard-cooked egg halves and scallions. If desired, sprinkle with crushed red pepper.

Serves 4

0834

Whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas, we’ve got you covered with a Paleo Diet approved recipe for your festivities. Following the Paleo Diet doesn’t mean you have to miss out on your favorite dishes – with slight modifications you can recreate the traditional recipes that remind you of your family’s traditions. Although The Paleo Diet permits Dr. Cordain’s 85:15 rule, the principle to avoid white flour and potatoes is rooted in science and evidenced by the adverse effects consumption has on your health.

See the following:

Flour Fortification with Folic Acid: Good Idea or Bad Idea
Are Potatoes Paleo?
Gluten and the Brain

Luckily, you won’t miss either of them in the Paleo Zucchini Pancakes and Scalloped Garnet Yams. By tradition, potato pancakes or latkes, often contain white flour, white potatoes, and are topped with refined sugar. The zucchini version doesn’t contain any of these ingredients, and even with the potato substitute, are still fluffy and savory.

Scalloped potatoes traditionally rely on white potatoes, cream, and white flour. The Paleo version substitutes flavorful herb coconut milk that creates a creamy sauce for the antioxidant rich garnet yams.

Start a new tradition in your family this year by incorporating these recipes into your celebrations!

PALEO ZUCCHINI PANCAKES

These savory pancakes can be served for breakfast, lunch or dinner as the main dish or a hearty side.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb zucchini (about 2 medium-sized zucchini)
  • 1 egg
  • 3 green onions, light green and white parts only
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground pepper
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Coconut oil, for frying

DIRECTIONS

0815
Grate the zucchini with a box grater or the grating attachment on your food processor. Don’t use a microplane grater as it releases too much water from the zucchini. Place the grated zucchini onto a clean dishtowel or cheesecloth.
5 item(s) « 1 of 5 »

PALEO SCALLOPED GARNET YAMS

Perfect to serve at a potluck, on the buffet table, or for any family dinner. Easy to make ahead and reheat just before serving.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 Garnet yams OR sweet potatoes (about 4 cups sliced)
  • ½ medium yellow onion, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 ½ tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ tsp dried sage
  • ¼ tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp dried thyme
  • Pinch of fresh ground pepper
  • 1 14.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk

DIRECTIONS

0793
In a large skillet pan, melt 1 ½ tablespoons of olive oil over medium-low heat. Add dried spices and pepper. Cook until the spices are fragrant (about 30 seconds) and then add in coconut milk. Reduce over a low simmer (stirring frequently) for approximately 20 minutes. The mixture should thicken and reduce by about 25%.
5 item(s) « 1 of 5 »

Stephanie Vuolo
@primarilypaleo
Facebook
Website

Stephanie Vuolo | The Paleo Diet Team

Stephanie Vuolo is a Certified Nutritional Therapist, an American College of Sports Medicine Personal Trainer, and a Certified CrossFit Level 1 Coach. She has a B.A. in Communications from Villanova University. She is a former contributor to Discovery Communications/TLC Blog, Parentables.

Stephanie lives in Seattle, WA, where she is a passionate and enthusiastic advocate for how diet and lifestyle can contribute to overall wellness and longevity. She has been raising her young daughter on the Paleo Diet since birth. You can visit her website at www.primarilypaleo.com.

Paleo Red Snapper with Zucchini and Fennel Seeds

Perfect for a busy midweek Paleo dinner, this lovely dish takes but 5 minutes to prepare and 30 minutes to cook. Red snapper is a deliciously reliable whitefish that takes on a flakey texture when cooked. In addition to reducing the risk for heart disease, regular consumption of fish for omega-3 fatty acids may be helpful in preventing, treating, or improving a wide variety of diseases and disorders, including but not limited to virtually all inflammatory diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorders, periodontal disease, many types of cancers, psoriasis, insulin resistance, type 1 and 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis.1 If you prefer to use other whitefish, like cod, halibut, and bass, they too work great with this recipe.

Paired with the sublime flavor combination of garlic, tomato, and fennel seeds, each ingredient boasts impressive health properties. The health benefits of including garlic and tomato are well known and well documented, but what about the humble fennel seed?

A 2011 study published in the Journal of Food Medicine tested various compounds contained in fennel seeds for their anticancer properties. Fennel seed methanolic extract (FSME) was found to have remarkable anticancer potential against particular breast cancer and liver cancer cells.2 The researchers also posited that FSME could be used as a safe and natural food preservative based on its ability to improve oxidative stability of fatty acids.

Fennel seeds have also been studied with regards to osteoporosis. A 2012 study published in the International Journal of Molecular Medicine concluded that fennel seeds, consumed in low doses, have the potential to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women.3 This is due to their ability to inhibit osteoclasts. So besides their unique culinary properties, fennel seeds also have impressive healing capabilities. We recommend you include them, when applicable, in your Paleo cooking.

Red snapper with zucchini and fennel seeds is a great recipe to get you started.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 2-3

  • 1 lb red snapper fillets
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 small zucchinis
  • 3 tomatoes
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • tbsp fennel seeds
  • 1 thyme, finely chopped

DIRECTIONS

snapper-6-wm
Ingredients
6 item(s) « 1 of 6 »
*Use the arrows in the lower gray bar of this image-viewer to move left or right through the directions. We recommend using one of following approved browsers for optimal viewing quality: Mozilla Firefox, Safari, or Google Chrome.

 

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

references

1. Cordain, L. (2013). Omega-3 Fatty Acid Content of Fish and Seafood. Retrieved from The Paleo Diet: //thepaleodiet.com/omega-3-fats-fish/

2. Mohamad, RH., et al. (September, 2011). Antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects of methanolic extract and volatile oil of fennel seeds (Foeniculum vulgare). Journal of Food Medicine, 14(9). Retrieved August 6, 2014 from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21812646

3. Kim, TH., et al. (June, 2012). Potent inhibitory effect of Foeniculum vulgare Miller extract on osteoclast differentiation and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. International Journal of Molecular Medicine, 29(6). Retrieved August 6, 2014 from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22447109

4 Anti-inflammatory Farmers Market Finds

National Farmer’s Market week celebrates two distinct and important aspects of this way of eating: locally-sourced foods and seasonally appropriate. And to that end, here are a few great, nutrient-dense seasonal foods you may find at your local market to include in your Paleo menu. Many of them provide not only a great variety of flavors, but also anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and otherwise health-promoting compounds. 2, 6

Broccoli

Broccoli is rich in vitamin C and fibre, and is surprisingly high in protein. It is a source of some potent phytochemicals, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which have demonstrated protective effects in models of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and other conditions.1, 5, 11 Sautéed with a little garlic (another nutritional powerhouse) in olive oil, and you’ve got a delicious side dish for any Paleo meal.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a good source of antioxidants, retinoids (vitamin A-like compounds), and lycopene. The latter has been shown to protect the skin from the damaging effects of excess ultraviolet radiation – which might come in handy in the summer months, coincidentally, when tomatoes are in season.4, 7, 10 Cooking tomatoes maximizes the lycopene content,3 perfect for a summer Paleo Gazpacho.

If you have an autoimmune disease, certain glycoalkaloids in tomatoes may act to increase intestinal permeability and also contain certain immunological adjuvants (alpha tomatine in tomatoes) that up-regulate the immune response and should be avoided.

Zucchini

Zucchini is rich in folate, copper, and potassium, and is an extremely low-calorie food; only about 10-15 calories in a whole zucchini. It’s also one of the best sources for lutein and zeaxanthin, two phytonutrients that are good for ocular health.9 Zucchini has a delicate flavor which has been described as savory by some, and can be sliced, grilled, and ready-to-eat in just a few minutes.

Raspberries

Raspberries are another great source of antioxidants and anthocyanins. One study showed the equivalent of about a handful of raspberries per day reduces markers of inflammation in the blood while another study showed potentially protective effects against colorectal cancer. 8

While this is a terribly abbreviated list, you’ll surely find many other great Paleo Diet approved options at your local Farmer’s Market, so by all means, enjoy!

William Lagakos, Ph.D.
@caloriesproper
CaloriesProper

William Lagakos, Ph.D.Dr. William Lagakos received a Ph.D. in Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology from Rutgers University where his research focused on dietary fat assimilation and integrated energy metabolism. His postdoctoral research at the University of California, San Diego, centered on obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Dr. William Lagakos has authored numerous manuscripts which have been published in peer-reviewed journals, as well as a non-fiction book titled The Poor, Misunderstood Calorie which explores the concept of calories and simultaneously explains how hormones and the neuroendocrine response to foods regulate nutrient partitioning. He is presently a nutritional sciences researcher, consultant, and blogger.

References

1. Jayakumar P, Pugalendi KV, Sankaran M. Attenuation of hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress by indole-3-carbinol and its metabolite 3, 3′- diindolylmethane in C57BL/6J mice. J Physiol Biochem. Jun 2014;70(2):525-534.

2. Jiang Y, Wu SH, Shu XO, Xiang YB, Ji BT, Milne GL, . . . Yang G. Cruciferous vegetable intake is inversely correlated with circulating levels of proinflammatory markers in women. J Acad Nutr Diet. May 2014;114(5):700-708 e702.

3. Kamiloglu S, Demirci M, Selen S, Toydemir G, Boyacioglu D, Capanoglu E. Home processing of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum): effects on in vitro bioaccessibility of total lycopene, phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidant capacity. J Sci Food Agric. Aug 2014;94(11):2225-2233.

4. Khachik F, Carvalho L, Bernstein PS, Muir GJ, Zhao DY, Katz NB. Chemistry, distribution, and metabolism of tomato carotenoids and their impact on human health. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). Nov 2002;227(10):845-851.

5. Lenzi M, Fimognari C, Hrelia P. Sulforaphane as a promising molecule for fighting cancer. Cancer Treat Res. 2014;159:207-223.

6. Macready AL, George TW, Chong MF, Alimbetov DS, Jin Y, Vidal A, . . . Group FS. Flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetables improve microvascular reactivity and inflammatory status in men at risk of cardiovascular disease–FLAVURS: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. Mar 2014;99(3):479-489.

7. Rizwan M, Rodriguez-Blanco I, Harbottle A, Birch-Machin MA, Watson RE, Rhodes LE. Tomato paste rich in lycopene protects against cutaneous photodamage in humans in vivo: a randomized controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. Jan 2011;164(1):154-162.

8. Sardo CL, Kitzmiller JP, Apseloff G, Harris RB, Roe DJD, Stoner GD, Jacobs ET. An Open-Label Randomized Crossover Trial of Lyophilized Black Raspberries on Postprandial Inflammation in Older Overweight Males: A Pilot Study. Am J Ther. Aug 26 2013.

9. Sommerburg O, Keunen JE, Bird AC, van Kuijk FJ. Fruits and vegetables that are sources for lutein and zeaxanthin: the macular pigment in human eyes. Br J Ophthalmol. Aug 1998;82(8):907-910.

10. Stahl W, Heinrich U, Aust O, Tronnier H, Sies H. Lycopene-rich products and dietary photoprotection. Photochem Photobiol Sci. Feb 2006;5(2):238-242.

11. Tarozzi A, Angeloni C, Malaguti M, Morroni F, Hrelia S, Hrelia P. Sulforaphane as a potential protective phytochemical against neurodegenerative diseases. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2013;2013:415078.

Affiliates and Credentials