Tag Archives: Salad

Fall HarvestFall is a fantastic season for food lovers – there are multitudes of delicious vegetables at local farmers markets, and the chill in the air calls for comfort foods like soups and stews. It’s the season for apple picking and stocking up on your favorites as your local farmers markets wind down for the year.

Since fall’s bounty has a lot to offer when you’re following the Paleo Diet you’re going to want to make the most of the fall harvest season while sticking to your Paleo eating habits. Here are some tips for healthy, tasty fall cooking.

 

What’s In Season?

The fruits and vegetables in season vary somewhat throughout the country, but in general fall is a great time for crisp salad greens, juicy apples, and storage vegetables like winter squash, root vegetables, onions, garlic, and cabbage. Depending on your location, you might still find summer favorites like tomatoes and peppers, too.

If you have a space to store produce, like a root cellar or even a cool closet or entryway, consider stocking up on your favorites at your local farmers market or grocery store. Apples, winter squash, root vegetables, onions and garlic can all be kept for months under the right conditions.

Drying and freezing can also help you preserve the fall harvest. Dried apple slices, frozen squash puree, and frozen caramelized onions are just a few options to keep tasty fall ingredients in the kitchen all year long. You can also hang bunches of herbs to dry, then store them in airtight jars – the flavor will be much better than store-bought dried herbs.

Of course, your favorite grass-fed and pasture-raised meats are available in the fall too. Some of your local farmers might offer bulk discounts if you buy a large amount of meat at once – consider stocking up your freezer for the fall and winter. Fall vegetables pair well with meat, like a lamb and butternut squash stew or roast beef over braised cabbage.

 

Paleo Recipes For Fall

Try these recipes, developed by The Paleo Diet team, for easy, delicious fall dishes.

Fall Harvest Salad – Salad isn’t just for summer – this hearty salad will sustain you through chilly fall days.

Paleo Applesauce – If you’ve been apple picking, or just have some apples lingering in your fridge, this quick and easy applesauce recipe makes a great snack (and kids will love it, too).

Butternut Squash Soup – Try this warming, comforting soup that highlights the sweet flavor of butternut squash. This recipe is also easy to adapt to other fall favorites like parsnips or sweet potatoes.

 

Try Something New

While the markets may not be bursting with the same variety of fresh fruits and vegetables you found in the summer, fall still offers plenty of exciting options. If you get a bit tired of kale and butternut squash, here are some new varieties to try. You might just find your new favorite fall dish.

Escarole: This member of the chicory family offers a pleasantly bitter flavor and packs quite a nutritional punch. You can add it to salads for extra crunch and flavor or give it a long braise to tame some of the bitterness, and it’s also fantastic in soups.

Delicata Squash: If you love winter squash but dread the challenging task of peeling hard-skinned varieties, give delicata a try. This thinner-skinned squash can be eaten peel and all, and its smaller size makes it much easier to prepare. This tasty squash is great roasted or sauteed, and is also great for stuffing.

Parsnips: If you love sweet fall carrots but want to try something new, or if you’re looking for a substitute for potatoes, give parsnips a chance. These long white root vegetables can be used like carrots but offer their own unique flavor. Try them shaved into a salad, roasted, mashed, or made into a hearty soup.

With help from the team at The Paleo Diet, you can make the most of fall, enjoy delicious meals, and stick to a way of eating that maximizes your health.

 

Almond Lime Kale Salad

During the past several years, kale has become a favorite “superfood” vegetable around the world. Despite its meteoric rise to prominence, kale has always been a favorite food of farmers because it grows fast, resists frost, and requires very little fertilizer.1 Kale is a winter vegetable, so now is a great time to start including it in your meals.

Nutritionally speaking, kale is a rock star, boasting high amounts of beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin K. It’s also a rich source of phytonutrients, including the flavonoid kaempferol. Epidemiological studies associate kaempferol consumption with reduced rates of several degenerative diseases and numerous preclinical studies have shown kaempferol to have a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective.2

In this recipe, we’re pairing kale with almonds. Like all seeds, almonds contain phytic acid, a chelating “antinutrient” with a propensity for binding with calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc, thereby inhibiting the absorption of these critical minerals.3 You can reduce the phytic acid by soaking the almonds in water for at least eight hours or, preferably, 24. From a culinary perspective, this also improves the taste and texture of the almonds.

Helpful hint: Soak one or two cups of almonds, then discard the soaking water, pat-dry the almonds with a kitchen towel, and store them in your refrigerator for 5 – 7 days. Not only will you always have some handy for a recipe, but also for a quick, nutritious snack.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 1

  • 3 – 4 kale leaves
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed
  • ½-inch piece of ginger, finely chopped
  • ½ cup almonds, soaked at least 8 hours
  • ½ lime, juiced
  • 2 tbsp olive oil

DIRECTIONS

kale-and-almonds4
Remove and discard the stems from the kale leaves. Chop leaves into bite-sized pieces.
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

 

references

1. Straight, K. (July 20, 2014). Rub of the Greens. ABC News. Retrieved from //www.abc.net.au/landline/content/2014/s4049600.htm

2. Calderón-Montaño, JM, et al. (April 2011). A review on the dietary flavonoid kaempferol. Mini Reviews in Medical Chemistry, 11(4). Retrieved from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21428901

3. Torre, M, et al. (1991). Effects of dietary fiber and phytic acid on mineral availability. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 30(1). Retrieved from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1657026

Calamari Salad | The Paleo Diet

We came across a delicious summer recipe on the back of a package of cooked, sliced calamari. With just a few modifications, we were able to substitute the necessary ingredients to make it pure Paleo. Calamari Salad is the perfect fresh dish to share on a warm evening with friends!

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 1 lb wild-caught sliced squid tentacles, precooked
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. white vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 sliced red or yellow pepper
  • 4 cups mixed green lettuce
  • 1 bunch cilantro leaves
  • 10 low sodium olives of your choice, rinsed and sliced
  • 1 fresh avocado
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • 2 large tomatoes

Directions

1. Combine calamari with olive oil, one teaspoon white vinegar and sliced pepper and set aside in serving bowl.

2. Toss together mixed greens and cilantro and spread evenly on large serving platter.

3. Add remaining ingredients to lettuce mixture.

4. When ready to eat, scoop squid mixture onto greens and toss together.

All the Best,

Lorrie Cordain, M.Ed., Co-Author of The Paleo Diet Cookbook

Have a recipe favorite you’ve modified? Share it with us in comments!

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