Tag Archives: pumpkin

Fall HarvestFall is a fantastic season for food lovers – there are multitudes of delicious vegetables at local farmers markets, and the chill in the air calls for comfort foods like soups and stews. It’s the season for apple picking and stocking up on your favorites as your local farmers markets wind down for the year.

Since fall’s bounty has a lot to offer when you’re following the Paleo Diet you’re going to want to make the most of the fall harvest season while sticking to your Paleo eating habits. Here are some tips for healthy, tasty fall cooking.

 

What’s In Season?

The fruits and vegetables in season vary somewhat throughout the country, but in general fall is a great time for crisp salad greens, juicy apples, and storage vegetables like winter squash, root vegetables, onions, garlic, and cabbage. Depending on your location, you might still find summer favorites like tomatoes and peppers, too.

If you have a space to store produce, like a root cellar or even a cool closet or entryway, consider stocking up on your favorites at your local farmers market or grocery store. Apples, winter squash, root vegetables, onions and garlic can all be kept for months under the right conditions.

Drying and freezing can also help you preserve the fall harvest. Dried apple slices, frozen squash puree, and frozen caramelized onions are just a few options to keep tasty fall ingredients in the kitchen all year long. You can also hang bunches of herbs to dry, then store them in airtight jars – the flavor will be much better than store-bought dried herbs.

Of course, your favorite grass-fed and pasture-raised meats are available in the fall too. Some of your local farmers might offer bulk discounts if you buy a large amount of meat at once – consider stocking up your freezer for the fall and winter. Fall vegetables pair well with meat, like a lamb and butternut squash stew or roast beef over braised cabbage.

 

Paleo Recipes For Fall

Try these recipes, developed by The Paleo Diet team, for easy, delicious fall dishes.

Fall Harvest Salad – Salad isn’t just for summer – this hearty salad will sustain you through chilly fall days.

Paleo Applesauce – If you’ve been apple picking, or just have some apples lingering in your fridge, this quick and easy applesauce recipe makes a great snack (and kids will love it, too).

Butternut Squash Soup – Try this warming, comforting soup that highlights the sweet flavor of butternut squash. This recipe is also easy to adapt to other fall favorites like parsnips or sweet potatoes.

 

Try Something New

While the markets may not be bursting with the same variety of fresh fruits and vegetables you found in the summer, fall still offers plenty of exciting options. If you get a bit tired of kale and butternut squash, here are some new varieties to try. You might just find your new favorite fall dish.

Escarole: This member of the chicory family offers a pleasantly bitter flavor and packs quite a nutritional punch. You can add it to salads for extra crunch and flavor or give it a long braise to tame some of the bitterness, and it’s also fantastic in soups.

Delicata Squash: If you love winter squash but dread the challenging task of peeling hard-skinned varieties, give delicata a try. This thinner-skinned squash can be eaten peel and all, and its smaller size makes it much easier to prepare. This tasty squash is great roasted or sauteed, and is also great for stuffing.

Parsnips: If you love sweet fall carrots but want to try something new, or if you’re looking for a substitute for potatoes, give parsnips a chance. These long white root vegetables can be used like carrots but offer their own unique flavor. Try them shaved into a salad, roasted, mashed, or made into a hearty soup.

With help from the team at The Paleo Diet, you can make the most of fall, enjoy delicious meals, and stick to a way of eating that maximizes your health.

 

Pumpkin- The Perfectly Paleo Carb for Athletes! | The Paleo Diet

With all the nonsense we see these days in the media, it would be easy to misunderstand one of the fundamental principles of a real Paleo diet:  it’s a balanced way of eating.

Contrary to popular belief, it is not a regime focused on eating only meat, all day long. In The Paleo Diet,1 Dr. Cordain explains that a true hunter-gatherer diet is comprised of a macronutrient balance as follows: Pro 19-35%, Cho 22-40%, Fat 28-47%

How do you like them apples? And while a crisp, green apple is a great way to sneak some low glycemic fruit2 into the mix, there are some other options we can enjoy in order to fuel for, or recover from our athletic endeavors.

At this time of year, when we’re just about to welcome autumn produce into our kitchens, what better way to do so than by incorporating one of the most seasonally appropriate fall fruits, the pumpkin?3

In addition to tasting great, pumpkin offers a wealth of health benefits:4

  • Improved eyesight, due to its high Vitamin A content.
  • Cancer prevention from its antioxidant profile, according to the National Cancer Institute.
  • And, perhaps most relevant to this article, a cup of cooked pumpkin has more of the refueling nutrient potassium, with 564 milligrams (compare that to a banana, which has 422).

A little extra potassium helps restore the body’s balance of electrolytes after a heavy workout and keeps muscles functioning at their best.  High in potassium and low in sodium, this is but one more piece of evidence to show how well pumpkin fits into the perfect Paleo profile.

But how do you eat it? Buying a can of it off the shelf isn’t exactly the most natural way to go about it. Here’s my favorite way to enjoy pumpkin with an interesting twist- you can use the squash itself as the serving vehicle!

PALEOISTA’S PUMPKIN SOUP

Paleoista's Pumpkin Soup | The Paleo Diet[/one_half]

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 small to medium sized pumpkin
  • 2 tbsp rendered duck fat, plus another tablespoon reserved
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 cup white mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 lb 100% grass fed chuck, cut into 1” cubes
  • 2 cups chicken or beef broth, plus more depending on desired consistency of soup
  • 1 spring thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 cups baby spinach
  • 2 tbsp freshly snipped chives, for garnish

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350° F.

2. Remove top from pumpkin and set aside.

3. Scoop out seeds, rinse and set aside to dry.

4. Heat duck fat in skillet over medium high.

5. Add onions and mushrooms and sauté until browned roughly 5 – 7 minutes.

6. Remove onions and mushrooms from skillet and brown beef on all sides, roughly 4 -6 minutes.

7. Add veggies back into skillet along with broth.

8. Scrape browned bits off bottom with wooden spatula.
9. Tie herbs together with kitchen twine and place in mixture.

10. Set pumpkin cut side up in Dutch Oven and use reserved fat to rub all over the outside of the rind.

11. Pour mixture into pumpkin, then cover with pumpkin top.

12. Place in oven and cook one hour, stirring halfway through.

13. Remove from oven and stir baby spinach into the mixture, then replace pumpkin top.

14. Let sit roughly five minutes, then serve in bowls, passing chives for garnish.
Enjoy the leftovers tomorrow after a long run or bike ride; soups and stews are even better on the second day!

 

REFERENCES

[1] Cordain, Loren. The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to Eat. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2011. Print.

[2] Braverman, Jody. “Are Apples Good for Keeping Blood Sugar Steady?” Healthy Eating. University of Redlands, n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2015.

[3] Nelson, Jennifer, RD. “Nutrition and Healthy Eating.” Fruit or Vegetable — Do You Know the Difference? The Mayo Clinic, 15 Aug. 2012. Web. 09 Sept. 2015

[4] Klein, Sarah. “8 Impressive Health Benefits of Pumpkin.” The Huffington Post. Th Huffington Post, 5 Oct. 2012. Web

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