Tag Archives: paleo

On the hunt for a versatile Paleo dish that is healthy, delicious and Italian? The search is over with these mushrooms, stuffed with ground turkey, veggies, and spices. Served as a main dish, appetizer, or side, this recipe is simple to prepare and can be included at any meal. Best of all, you can enjoy an Italian treat without the pasta. Mama Mia!

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Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms

Ground Turkey Stuffed Mushrooms

On the hunt for a versatile Paleo dish that is healthy, delicious and Italian? The search is over with these mushrooms, stuffed with ground turkey, veggies, and spices. Served as a main dish, appetizer, or side, this recipe is simple to prepare and can be included at any meal. Best of all, you can enjoy an Italian treat without the pasta. Mama Mia!

  • Author: Lorrie Cordain
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 50 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 2 - 4 people 1x
  • Category: Main Dish/Side Dish/Appetizer
  • Cuisine: Italian
Scale

Ingredients

  • 8 large portobello mushrooms stems and gills removed
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Fresh cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 1 onion diced
  • 1 red bell pepper diced
  • 1 green bell pepper diced
  • 4 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 28 ounce can crushed tomatoes, salt free
  • 8 fresh, chopped basil leaves for garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. Clean mushroom caps and remove stems. Use a spoon to scrape out and discard the gills.
  3. Arrange mushroom caps on a baking sheet, brush with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and season with pepper. Set aside.
  4. In a large sauté pan over medium heat, brown the ground turkey. Remove from pan and set aside.
  5. Add remaining tablespoon olive oil to the pan and stir in onions and bell peppers.
  6. Sprinkle with cracked pepper and sauté until their water has evaporated, and they are soft and starting to turn golden.
  7. Add the garlic and oregano. sauté for 30 seconds.
  8. Stir in the crushed tomatoes. Put the ground turkey back into the pan and stir into mixture.
  9. Simmer for at least 20 minutes to let flavors combine.
  10. Spoon sausage mixture into the mushrooms caps and bake on non-stick baking sheet for 15 minutes, or until mushrooms are tender.
  11. Finish under the broiler for 1-2 minutes.
  12. Garnish with fresh basil.

Notes

Ground Turkey Stuffed Mushrooms

Keywords: paleo, stuffed mushrooms, ground turkey, portabella

cheering woman open arms at sunrise mountain peak wellness concept[This article discusses health improvements based, at least in part, on a ketogenic diet. Professor Loren Cordain and many others, including The Paleo Diet editorial review board, don’t recommend or endorse long-term ketogenic dieting for the general public. They do acknowledge that it can be effective if used short-term or as a therapeutic measure for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases.]

 

The title of Dr. Terry Wahls’ book, The Wahls Protocol: A radical new way to treat all chronic autoimmune conditions using Paleo principles, [1] highlights issues vital to retirees or anyone facing autoimmune conditions. But it also modestly avoids the book’s central revelation: Wahls’ own personal experience dramatically improving severe multiple sclerosis symptoms.

An avid martial artist and cyclist when first diagnosed with MS, Wahls became progressively debilitated despite the best conventional medical care—including drugs and chemotherapy. Within seven years she was wheelchair-bound, only able to walk short distances using two canes.

A firmly committed conventional physician herself, she realized she needed to look beyond Western medicine and began her own research. This resulted in a carefully crafted, rigorous diet-and-lifestyle intervention that improved her health so dramatically she could walk without canes or assistance at four months and ride a bicycle (for the first time in 10 years) at five months. She remains fully active today, devoted to both widening awareness of health problems caused by the standard Western diet and to clinical research on replicating her personal results.

 

“How did I not know any of this?” (from The Wahls Protocol, p. 5)

Many hours on Google and PubMed eventually led Wahls to the Paleolithic or Ancestral diet, which became integral to her own protocol and recovery. She credits Professor Loren Cordain as a strong early influence in her research, including his book The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to Eat. [2] Wahls gradually abandoned her conventional Western (vegetarian) diet, and designed from scratch, by trial and error, an intensively micro- and phytonutrient-rich whole-food regimen. Her goal was not just to remove western staples like processed foods, grains, and legumes, but to add optimal levels of all vitamins and minerals needed to promote brain health—using food, not supplements.

The balance of macronutrients—heavy on vegetables, some fruit and healthy fats—that appears to have improved Wahls’ MS symptoms result in “mild ketosis.” Her protocol also includes regular exercise, toxin reduction, e-stim, whole body vibration, and decreasing stress. Some supplements may be used, but the bulk of nutrients are derived from whole foods. Her well-known TED talk [3] concisely introduces her protocol—and describes her remarkable personal resurgence. It is just as timely today as it was when it was recorded in 2011. It has been viewed (as of this writing) over 3 million times.

 

Many conditions, one etiology

Wahls views most chronic health issues, and specifically autoimmune conditions like MS, as essentially the same disease [4]:

“The primary driver of disease is biochemical dysfunction/accelerated aging due to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell membrane dysfunction. Fix those two things—cells begin to repair organs, organs function well, aging slows and often reverses, and the need for pharmacologic interventions decline and we need to steadily reduce and often eliminate prescription drugs…” [5]

In an email interview, Wahls reports success using her protocol “across a large swath of disease states across multiple specialties,” both helping patients and causing previously skeptical colleagues to reconsider her approach. [5] She emphasizes cellular nutrition, multiplying and strengthening mitochondria (the “engines” or energy-producing substructures in each cell) and the importance of treating the whole person to restore optimal biochemical processes.

Wahls, who added functional medicine to her own medical practice during her MS research, also notes that the basic whole-food, whole-person protocol can be at least as effective as a costly test- and supplement-intensive functional approaches. As many patients find, good functional practitioners are scarce—and typically not covered by health insurance. Extended functional treatment may cost thousands of dollars, including exotic lab work, versus a modest increase in the household food budget, with some funds earmarked for stress-reduction, natural detox and exercise.

Despite the success of her protocol, Wahls cautions that medical supervision is still important, especially for MS and other autoimmune patients taking medication. Each individual responds differently. Wahls recommends monitoring the protocol based on standard indicators including lipid profile, homocysteine, insulin and A1C levels. If adjustments are necessary, they typical involve changes in ratios of various vegetables, targeted supplements, or possibly the amount of dietary fat consumed.

 

Paleo vs. Keto in the protocol

The Wahls Protocol offers three versions or levels of the diet, all of which are built on six to nine cups of vegetables (and some fruit) each day. Wahls recognizes the initial difficulty of eliminating classic Western diet stressors, like sugar, grains, potatoes and dairy. These are first de-emphasized, then restricted, and finally eliminated in the third level, called “Wahls Paleo Plus.” This level targets “mild” ketosis and is credited by Wahls for reversing her MS symptoms.

Wahls includes exercise, e-stim, detox, and stress reduction in all levels.

“Wahls Paleo Plus” is unusually nutrient-dense compared to other ketogenic plans, and includes at least six cups of greens, sulfur-rich and colorful vegetables, along with coconut milk, seaweed, organ meats, and grass-fed or other carefully sourced protein. Ketosis should be consistent (but may be intermittent.)

Wahls observes, however, that no modern (or ancestral) hunter-gatherer populations maintain a year-round ketogenic diet, and that it may not be practical or even desirable, as we’ve pointed out on this website, to stay in ketosis indefinitely. She has come to favor cycling through periodic fasting (or a fasting-mimicking diet), other caloric restriction, and matching a ketogenic diet to the winter season of an individual’s ethnic background. [5]

This fosters therapeutic ketosis for a generous stretch of time each year, takes advantage of occasional controlled fasting to promote autophagy and detoxification, and allows “three-seasons” use of the less restrictive ancestral food choices in “Wahls Paleo” (the second level of the protocol.)

 

“Wahls Paleo” study results

Wahls estimates [6] that most of her patients choose the second level of the diet or “Wahls Paleo.” It follows many common Paleo guidelines, with the nine cups of vegetables as a foundation. No gluten-bearing food is permitted, and starches like legumes, brown rice, or potatoes are severely limited (two servings per week at most.)

Anecdotal evidence of patient success in her books (and on the internet) is strong, but Wahls has gone beyond word of mouth. Her intervention, typically at the “Wahls Paleo” level [5], has shown improvement or reversal of MS symptoms in multiple studies.

One study, first published in 2019 in PloS One, tracked changes in lipid profiles and the associated improvements in fatigue scoring. The intervention (diet plus e-stim, exercise, and stress-reduction) measurably reduced fatigue, a primary symptom of progressive MS, over 12 months. [7]

The same intervention was shown to improve gait and balance, primarily in mild-to-moderate progressive MS patients in a 2017 study first published in Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease. [8] Wahls shared a related YouTube video showing some very marked improvements. [5,9]

Another important 2017 study, which first appeared in The Journal of the American College of Nutrition, showed that progressive MS patient scores for mood, cognitive and executive function, and anxiety were measurably improved by the Wahls intervention [10]. The authors noted, in particular, that the Paleolithic dietary component specifically improved mood and cognition more directly than the exercise or stress management. Fatigue, anxiety, and depression scores increased more gradually, but showed significant improvement after several months.

Finally, a 2019 study first published in Nutrients compared “Wahls Paleo” to a standard American “healthy diet.” Conventional nutritional bias is carefully balanced against Wahls’ recommendations and concluded that nutrient density was comparable in both diets (specifically that the Wahls diet is “safe” to follow.) [11]

Dr. Wahls’ work has important implications for treatment of all autoimmune conditions. Her success in reversing symptoms of a long-standing, progressive debilitating disease like MS, deserves much wider recognition.

 

REFERENCES

  1. Wahls, Terry, M. D., and Eve Adamson. The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles. Reprint edition, Avery, 2014. (hereafter “Wahls”)
  2. Cordain, Loren. The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to Eat. Revised edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2010.
  3. Wahls, Terry. YouTube. 30 Nov. 2011, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLjgBLwH3Wc.
  4. Wahls P. 47
  5. Wahls, Terry, M.D., email to the author, 9/3/2019
  6. Wahls P. 149
  7. Fellows Maxwell, Kelly, et al. “Lipid Profile Is Associated with Decreased Fatigue in Individuals with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Following a Diet-Based Intervention: Results from a Pilot Study.” PloS One, vol. 14, no. 6, 2019, p. e0218075. PubMed, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0218075.
  8. Bisht, Babita, et al. “Effects of a Multimodal Intervention on Gait and Balance of Subjects with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective Longitudinal Pilot Study.” Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease, vol. 7, 2017, pp. 79–93. PubMed, doi:10.2147/DNND.S128872.
  9. Bisht, Babita et al. YouTube. 26 Nov. 2017, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsOMPBS277Q.
  10. Lee, Jennifer E., et al. “A Multimodal, Nonpharmacologic Intervention Improves Mood and Cognitive Function in People with Multiple Sclerosis.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 36, no. 3, Apr. 2017, pp. 150–68. PubMed, doi:10.1080/07315724.2016.1255160.
  11. Chenard, Catherine A., et al. “Nutrient Composition Comparison between a Modified Paleolithic Diet for Multiple Sclerosis and the Recommended Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern.” Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 3, Mar. 2019. PubMed, doi:10.3390/nu11030537.

 

Looking for a colorful and healthy Paleo breakfast option to spice up your morning routine? This dish covers all the requirements for a healthy and delicious start to your day. Packed with protein and nutritious veggies, it’s a complete meal that will keep your hunger at bay throughout your morning. Enjoy with a side of fresh seasonal fruit for added benefits!

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Poached Eggs in Chicken Broth with Mixed Vegetables

Poached Eggs in Chicken Broth with Mixed Vegetables

Poached Eggs in Chicken Broth with Mixed VegetablesLooking for a colorful and healthy Paleo breakfast option to spice up your morning routine? This dish covers all the requirements for a healthy and delicious start to your day. Packed with protein and nutritious veggies, it’s a complete meal that will keep your hunger at bay throughout your morning. Enjoy with a side of fresh seasonal fruit for added benefits!

  • Author: Lorrie Cordain
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 2-4 People 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
  • Cuisine: American
Scale

Ingredients

  • 8 cups low/no sodium chicken stock
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 lb. asparagus, trimmed, cut into 3” pieces
  • 4 small carrots, peeled, sliced 2″ thick
  • 8 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, halved
  • 8 ramps, green and white parts separated, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup torn basil leaves
  • 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • freshly ground pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil (for drizzling)

Instructions

  1. Bring stock to a simmer in a small pot over medium-high heat.
  2. Crack an egg into a small bowl, then gently slide egg into stock. (If you want a crystal-clear broth, you can poach the eggs in water instead.)
  3. Repeat with remaining eggs, waiting until whites are opaque before adding the next one (about 30 seconds).
  4. Poach eggs until whites are set and yolks are still runny, about 3 minutes.
  5. Using a slotted spoon, transfer eggs to paper towels as they are done.
  6. Reduce heat to medium and return stock to a gentle simmer.
  7. Add asparagus, carrots, mushrooms, and white parts of ramps.
  8. Cook, stirring occasionally, until asparagus and carrots are tender, 3–5 minutes.
  9. Remove from heat and stir in basil, vinegar, and ramp greens; season with salt.
  10. Divide broth and vegetables among bowls.
  11. Gently slip an egg or 2 into each bowl; season with pepper and drizzle with oil.

Notes

Poached Eggs in Chicken Broth with Mixed Vegetables Ingredients

Poached Eggs in Chicken Broth with Mixed Vegetables

Keywords: poached eggs, chicken, broth, vegetables, eggs, paleo

Apple and a Donut

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There is a natural energy cycle to a normal working day. Everyone has a morning routine that ends when they get to work. Then they pick up speed into late morning and by lunchtime, they are ready to recharge on some hopefully tasty food before finishing a few projects. But by mid-afternoon, everyone starts to feel a little tired. Their eyes droop and it gets harder to focus. In order to continue working efficiently, most people reach for a coffee, that candy bar in their desk, or head for the vending machine for a packaged pick-me-up.

But as you probably know from experience, some snacks are more effective at perking you up than others. The problem is that most people get their afternoon pick-me-up from the vending machine or an indulgent stash of desk snacks. Let’s dive into the three most tempting but least helpful snacks in the vending machine that will leave you tired all afternoon. More importantly, let’s talk about how to choose more energizing Paleo alternatives that are equally satisfying and will energize you for your day.

1) Snack Cakes

Snack cakes are by far the most tempting item in the vending machine. They look like a great option for people who are hungry again after lunch. Snack cakes seem like more food per package than other options and the sugar provides a temporary energy (and motivational) kick on a hard day. However, that energy doesn’t stick with you for long.

Alternative: Instead of refined sugary carbs, sate your sweet tooth and get that energy boost the Paleo natural way with energy balls, usually made of blended nuts, shaved coconut, raw cocoa powder, and fresh fruit. These will satisfy your sweet craving while actually filling you with energizing proteins that will help you make it to closing time.

 

2) Potato Chips

For many of us, feeling sluggish is easily answered with the taste of salt. Potato chips are a common afternoon solution when it’s hard to focus because salt granules on your tongue can effectively perk up your brain. However, chips are made of refined, pressed, and oil-fried starch and just like the snack cakes, the energy provided is only temporary. Worse, potatoes are very high on the glycemic index and have the same effect as consuming straight sugar with all the usual implications.

Alternative: If you crave a savory snack, there are tons of great Paleo alternatives. Try a small handful of salt-free mixed nuts instead.

 

3) Candy Bars

The candy bar is one of the least healthy vending machine options for your 2pm pick-me-up. But boy is it satisfying. Candy bars often have several tempting elements from the caffeine-laced chocolate to the protein-rich nuts inside. But a candy bar is also packed with unnecessary calories in sugar and fat. Not to mention the predictable sugar crash an hour later.

Don’t set yourself up for negative consequences by grabbing a candy bar from the vending machine or keeping a stash in your desk. You’ll only find yourself hungry and tired no matter how satisfying the chocolate was at first.

Alternative: A candy bar craving often signifies a need for calories and nutrient variety. Especially if you crave nuts in your chocolate. Instead of heading to the vending machine, try packing yourself a healthy trail mix of nuts, seeds, dried fruit, and dark chocolate. That will definitely hit the spot without the diet-guilt of munching on a candy bar full of empty calories. It’s not perfectly Paleo, but a far better alternative to candy bars.

Many professionals make the wrong choice when looking for snacks that will keep them energized and efficient at work. And the vending machine options aren’t doing them any favors. If you want your team to face the usual afternoon drowsiness head-on, consider providing healthy snacks that are long-term sources of energy like nuts, some trail mixes, and of course fresh fruit and vegetables.

 

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Whether you celebrate Hanukkah or Christmas, we’ve got you covered with a Paleo Diet approved recipe for your festivities. Following the Paleo Diet doesn’t mean you have to miss out on your favorite dishes – with slight modifications you can recreate the traditional recipes that remind you of your family’s traditions. Although The Paleo Diet permits Dr. Cordain’s 85:15 rule, the principle to avoid white flour and potatoes is rooted in science and evidenced by the adverse effects consumption has on your health.

See the following:

Flour Fortification with Folic Acid: Good Idea or Bad Idea
Are Potatoes Paleo?
Gluten and the Brain

Luckily, you won’t miss either of them in the Paleo Zucchini Pancakes and Scalloped Garnet Yams. By tradition, potato pancakes or latkes, often contain white flour, white potatoes, and are topped with refined sugar. The zucchini version doesn’t contain any of these ingredients, and even with the potato substitute, are still fluffy and savory.

Scalloped potatoes traditionally rely on white potatoes, cream, and white flour. The Paleo version substitutes flavorful herb coconut milk that creates a creamy sauce for the antioxidant-rich garnet yams.

Start a new tradition in your family this year by incorporating these recipes into your celebrations!

PALEO ZUCCHINI PANCAKES

These savory pancakes can be served for breakfast, lunch or dinner as the main dish or a hearty side.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb zucchini (about 2 medium-sized zucchini)
  • 1 egg
  • 3 green onions, light green and white parts only
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground pepper
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Coconut oil, for frying

DIRECTIONS

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Grate the zucchini with a box grater or the grating attachment on your food processor. Don’t use a microplane grater as it releases too much water from the zucchini. Place the grated zucchini onto a clean dishtowel or cheesecloth.
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PALEO SCALLOPED GARNET YAMS

Perfect to serve at a potluck, on the buffet table, or for any family dinner. Easy to make ahead and reheat just before serving.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 Garnet yams OR sweet potatoes (about 4 cups sliced)
  • ½ medium yellow onion, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 ½ tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ tsp dried sage
  • ¼ tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp dried thyme
  • Pinch of fresh ground pepper
  • 1 14.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk

DIRECTIONS

0793
In a large skillet pan, melt 1 ½ tablespoons of olive oil over medium-low heat. Add dried spices and pepper. Cook until the spices are fragrant (about 30 seconds) and then add in coconut milk. Reduce over a low simmer (stirring frequently) for approximately 20 minutes. The mixture should thicken and reduce by about 25%.
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Stephanie Vuolo
@primarilypaleo
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Stephanie Vuolo | The Paleo Diet Team

Stephanie Vuolo is a Certified Nutritional Therapist, an American College of Sports Medicine Personal Trainer, and a Certified CrossFit Level 1 Coach. She has a B.A. in Communications from Villanova University. She is a former contributor to Discovery Communications/TLC Blog, Parentables.

Stephanie lives in Seattle, WA, where she is a passionate and enthusiastic advocate for how diet and lifestyle can contribute to overall wellness and longevity. She has been raising her young daughter on the Paleo Diet since birth. You can visit her website at www.primarilypaleo.com.

 

The BEST Fat Loss Diet in The World | The Paleo Diet

It’s officially 2020, the New Year is upon us, and with it maybe you’ve made many resolutions to lose weight and get into shape. With so many magazines and websites filled with the latest fad diets, how do you know which diet really works best? The good news is the scientific research is actually quite clear with respect to the ‘best diet’ for not only promoting fat loss but also improving your overall health.

A low-carb diet (LC), or its cousin the very low-carb ketogenic diet (VLCK), are head and shoulders above the rest when it comes to promoting weight loss and upgrading your health. A low-carb diet is typically classified as a diet consisting of 100g of carbs or less per day, whereas a very low-carb ketogenic diet is generally 50g of carbs or less. (It’s called a ketogenic diet due to the ketone body by-products produced when the body switches over to primarily fat- burning for fuel.)

Practically, adopting a LC or VLCK diet entails decreasing your intake of starchy carbohydrates while increasing your consumption of tasty lean proteins, healthy fats, nutrient-dense veggies and whole fruits.

For some this might be a whole new approach to eating, for others something you’ve experimented with in the past. How do low-carb and very low-carb ketogenic diets work to promote weight loss? There are numerous physiological mechanisms at play. Let’s take a closer look.

A low-carb diet dramatically improves your blood sugar control and the function of your blood sugar hormone insulin.1 After you eat a meal, insulin’s job is to get the sugars from your bloodstream into your cells.  The more overweight or out of shape you are, the greater the amount of insulin your body produces to get the job done. This leads to higher insulin levels in the blood, which directly blocks your capacity to burn fat via the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) enzyme. This person would be called insulin insensitive and if the condition persisted they would eventually become insulin resistant and develop type-II diabetes.

How does this relate to carbohydrates? Carbohydrates exert the greatest impact on your insulin output, therefore by reducing your carb intake (and increasing your consumption of healthy proteins and fats) you’ll improve your body’s insulin sensitivity or efficiency at shuttling the food you eat into your cells where it can be used for energy.

A recent meta-analysis in the British Journal of Nutrition of 1,400 people adopting a very low-carb diet showed significant reductions in bodyweight, as well as lower triglycerides and improved good HDL cholesterol.2 Another study in the New England Journal of Medicine of 322 obese patients revealed that the low-carb group on an unrestricted calorie diet lost more weight than subjects on a calorie-restricted low fat diet, or a Mediterranean diet.3 The beauty of a low-carb diet for weight loss is that you don’t have to bother counting calories and you’ll still see results.

It’s not just the hormone insulin contributing to all the positive outcomes. Low-carb diets increase your body’s satiety signals via the increase in protein consumption and improved efficiency of the satiety hormone leptin.4,5 Low-carb diets also trigger greater lipolysis – the breakdown of body-fat – as your body shifts to burning fat as a primary fuel source.6 There is also an increase in the metabolic cost of producing glucose (gluconeogenesis) when on a low-carb diet, which requires your body to burn more energy and translates into a slimmer waistline and better health for clients.7

A Paleo dietary approach fits perfectly with a low-carb or very low-carb ketogenic diet due to the inherently higher intake of lean proteins, healthy fats, and abundant vegetables.  The natural elimination of grains on a Paleo diet quickly and easily reduces your total carb intake (although it’s important to remember that not all Paleo diets need to be low-carb, particularly in athletes). The goods news is you’re replacing the nutrient-poor starchy grains with nutrient-dense veggies and fruits. This promotes not only superior weight loss but better overall health.

The latest research shows a low-carb diet also comes with a myriad of other health benefits, such as; improved blood pressure, triglycerides, cardiovascular health, cognitive function, and reduced inflammation.8,9,10 These are profound and dramatic changes that stem from simply eating more in-tune with how your body has evolved. (Not even best drugs in the world could improve these parameters so significantly!)

So, why isn’t everyone who is overweight or out of shape on a low-carb Paleo diet? Unfortunately, even many old diet and nutrition myths still persist in doctor’s and dietician’s offices across the country.

One of the most common mistakes is avoiding saturated fats for fear they will worsen a patient’s cardiovascular health. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, studies continue to pour out of the scientific literature confirming that your dietary intake of saturated fat does NOT impact your blood levels. In fact, the study goes on to show that carbohydrates are the real culprits (if you are overweight or out of shape), increasing blood levels of saturated fats alongside a key marker associated with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type-2 diabetes.11 In short, cut the carbs to get your health and bodyweight back on track.

Now that you know why a low-carb diet is best way to lose weight and improve your health, the next step is implementing the diet into your day-to-day routine.

If you are new to the Paleo diet or have a lot of weight to lose, start out slow and scale up. Remember, whether you’re just starting out or have been following Paleo for sometime, our 85:15 Rule permits the inclusion of three ‘cheat’ meals per week, where you can loosen the rules, not feel too restricted, and ease into the Paleo lifestyle.

Here is a sample day of meals for beginners with recipes to get you started!

By following this approach many will lose weight gradually, feel satiated and content, and not compromise health or performance at work or in the gym.

Make 2020 a year to remember, transform your body and mind with a low-carb Paleo diet, and unlock your weight loss and performance potential.

REFERENCES

[1]Ballard, K et al. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitiv­ity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.Nutr Res.2013 Nov;33(11):905-12.

[2]Bueno, N et al. Very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet v.low-fat diet for long-term weight loss: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.Br J Nutr.2013 Oct;110(7):1178-87.

[3]Shai I, Schwarzfuchs D, Henkin Y, et al. Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet. N Engl J Med 2008;359:229-41.

[4]Veldhorst M., Smeets A., Soenen S., Hochstenbach-Waelen A., Hursel R., Diepvens K., Lejeune M., Luscombe-Marsh N., Westerterp-Plantenga M. Protein-induced satiety: Effects and mechanisms of different proteins. Physiol. Behav. 2008;94:300–307.

[5]Sumithran P., Prendergast L.A., Delbridge E., Purcell K., Shulkes A., Kriketos A., Proietto J. Ketosis and appetite-mediating nutrients and hormones after weight loss. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 2013;67:759–764

[6]Cahill G.F., Jr. Fuel metabolism in starvation. Annu. Rev. Nutr. 2006;26:1–22.

[7]Tagliabue A., Bertoli S., Trentani C., Borrelli P., Veggiotti P. Effects of the ketogenic diet on nutritional status, resting energy expenditure, and substrate oxidation in patients with medically refractory epilepsy: A 6-month prospective observational study. Clin. Nutr. 2012;31:246–249.

[8]Perez-Guisado, J.Munoz-Serrano A.A pilot study of the Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: an effective therapy for the metabolic syndrome.J Med Food.2011 Jul-Aug;14(7-8):681-7.

[9]Crane P.et al.Glucose Levels and Risk of Dementia.NEJM.Sept 2013 Vol 369.

[10]Heilbronn LK et al. Energy restriction and weight loss on very low-fat diets reduce C-reacctive protein concentrations in obese, healthy women. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2001;21:968-970.

[11]Volk B et al. Effects of Step-Wise Increases in Dietary Carbohydrate on Circulating Saturated Fatty Acids and Palmitoleic Acid in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome. Plus ONE 2014, Nov 21:1-16.

Paleo Diet followers find the first meal of the day to be essential for getting the energy and nutrition they need for a great start to their morning. Eating healthy doesn’t have to mean giving up your favorite foods. This take on the traditional Eggs Benedict, offers a healthy and flavourful alternative to a popular breakfast dish. Paired with fresh foot and herbal tea, makes this one of our favorite ways to get going each day.

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Paleo Eggs Benedict

Paleo Eggs Benedict

Paleo Eggs BenedictPaleo Diet followers find the first meal of the day to be essential for getting the energy and nutrition they need for a great start to their morning. Eating healthy doesn’t have to mean giving up your favorite foods. This take on the traditional Eggs Benedict, offers a healthy and flavourful alternative to a popular breakfast dish. Paired with fresh fruit and herbal tea, makes this one of our favorite ways to get going each day.

  • Author: Lorrie Cordain
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 2 people 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
  • Cuisine: American
Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 slices of nitrate free low sodium bacon, crumbled (optional)**
  • 1 tomato
  • 1/2 avocado
  • Juice from ½ fresh lemon
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 3 tablespoon water
  • 2 large eggs
  • Cracked pepper
  • 2 slices of nitrate free low sodium bacon, crumbled (optional)**

Instructions

  1. Cook bacon in large fry pan over medium heat, until crispy.
  2. Pat dry, crumble and set aside.
  3. Slice tomato into quarter inch slices and place on 2 medium sized plates.
  4. Put avocado, lemon juice, garlic, and water in food processor.
  5. Blend until smooth.
  6. Use an egg poacher to poach the eggs to desired finish.
  7. Place eggs on top of tomato slices and sprinkle with cracked pepper.
  8. Add avocado sauce and top with bacon pieces.

Notes

**Bacon is not part of a pure Paleo Diet due to its high salt and nitrate content. The healthiest option is to use pork bellies seasoned with black pepper and smoky, salt free seasonings.

Paleo Eggs Benedict Ingredients Paleo Eggs Benedict

Keywords: paleo, eggs benedict, eggs

Happy New Year 2020

Paleo critics are always voicing unsubstantiated claims. Their attacks are easily countered, but they sometimes create confusion and discouragement, especially for those who are new to Paleo. The British Dietetic Association, for example, has called Paleo a “time consuming, socially-isolating diet.” If you’re just starting out with Paleo, it’s probably better to get your advice from people who actually follow the lifestyle, not from critics who simply parrot talking points.

The Paleo Diet shouldn’t be time-consuming or socially isolating, nor should it be overly expensive. Above all, the Paleo Diet is flexible. Whatever your personal circumstances, you can customize the Paleo Diet so it works for you. Here are 5 great tips to get you started.

1. Master the Slow-Cooker

The slow-cooker is one of your best kitchen-friends. It saves you time and money while helping you cook meals that taste like they were prepared by a professional chef…or by your grandmother. With a slow-cooker, you can save money on meat by buying the cheaper, tougher cuts, which are just as tasty (and nutritious) after being cooked for several hours.

The slow-cooker also saves you time, because the cooking is passive. Slow-cookers are designed to be safe even when they are unattended. Most of us would be wary about leaving the oven or stove turned on while we were away from the house for several hours. With a slow-cooker, however, this is perfectly acceptable.

2. Eating at Restaurants

Paleo need not be “socially isolating.” Sure, if your friends are going out for pizza and sodas, you should probably pass, but at most restaurants you’ll find plenty of Paleo-compliant choices. Go for grilled meat or fish plus steamed vegetables or a salad. Salad dressings will typically have canola or other vegetable oils, so ask your server to bring you olive oil and lemon juice on the side.

3. Lunch On the Go

The reality of our modern lifestyles is that you probably won’t be able to eat every meal at home. Get into the habit of taking your lunch with you, especially if you work at an office. Make a Paleo meal, preferably something that tastes good cold, and get some glass or BPA-free plastic storage containers with lids that lock into place. Usually, you can find mini-size containers for sauces and dressing, so as to avoid soggy salads.

4. Strategic Leftovers

Another key to minimizing kitchen time is using leftovers strategically. This starts by intentionally cooking extras, with the plan of using these extras for upcoming meals. For example, you’re cooking steaks. Cook one or two more than you need. Let them cool and then refrigerate. Later, slice thinly with a sharp knife. Add this to a salad. Congratulations, you’re salad has just become a complete meal. You can do the same thing with turkey, duck, lamb, and other meats.

5. Making Fabulous Sauces

A great way to fancy up your vegetable dishes is with sauces. Sure, you could just drizzle some coconut oil or olive oil on salads and steamed vegetables, but sauces bring these foods to another level, which might be important for you, especially if you are seeking more variety and when cooking for family or friends.

Here’s a simple sauce strategy. You’ll need a blender, preferably a small one. Blend a small handful of nuts (cashews, almonds, or macadamia) with a couple spoons of olive oil, a few spoons of lemon juice, and a handful of washed herbs (stems removed), like parsley, cilantro, or mint. Add just enough water to achieve a smooth, creamy texture.

You’ll find plenty more tips and tricks throughout this website. Start the New Year off right. Make Paleo work for you!

The Paleo Diet | Christmas Nuts

When it comes to the holidays, it can be much more difficult to stick to your Paleo Diet. But – fortunately – there are many ways to “Paleo-fy” your favorite holiday meals. Today, I will be covering how you can transform a traditional Christmas dinner – into a much healthier one. Forget the empty calories of stuffing, rolls and pumpkin pie. Instead, say hello to some delicious sweet potatoes, free-range organic turkey and a large helping of brain-friendly vegetables! While your loved ones may be passed out on the couch after dinner, you will be energized, alert – and maybe even ready to run a 5K. So without further ado, here is my guide on how to have the best Paleo Christmas dinner.

 

Forget the Rolls, Bread, Mashed Potatoes and Stuffing

As I have covered many times on The Paleo Diet, gluten and pseudograins are not ideal for your body (or brain).1,2,3 And as Dr. Cordain has written, white potatoes are not the healthiest choice for you, either.4 The first difference between a healthy, Paleo Christmas dinner and the more gluttonous traditional version? Sweeping away all the extra, empty calories! As tough as it may be, say goodbye to the huge doses of stuffing, bread, mashed potatoes and rolls. But just because you might be skipping these – does not mean you necessarily have to forget about all forms of carbohydrates.

 

Replace Them with Sweet Potatoes and Mashed Cauliflower

Sweet potatoes are much different than the traditional white potato, and make a great substitute for holiday meals. And if you are missing the mashed potatoes – try mashing up some cauliflower instead.5 Once you add some grass-fed butter, herbs, spices and perhaps even some other vegetables, to this mashed mix, you will hardly notice the difference! Not only are you avoiding the numerous problems with white potatoes – you are getting a much bigger dose of nutrients than you normally would, at a traditional holiday meal.6,7,8,9,10,11

 

Keep the Turkey, But Make Sure It Is Properly Sourced

The best news about a Paleo holiday dinner? You can still indulge in the turkey! That’s right, keep the bird on the table. However, it is important to make sure you get a free-range, organic turkey. Though the cost may be slightly more, the benefits of properly sourced meat are definitely worth it.12,13,14,15 For example, an organic, free-range turkey has absolutely zero of the hormones or antibiotics, which are usually found in most meat.

The most commonly asked question I get about buying this premium type of bird is ‘do I really need to spend this much more on a turkey?’. While there is little doubt that a high quality turkey may cost more upfront – most people have no problem paying the extra cost, once they realize exactly what they are avoiding.16,17,18,19

For example, a regular turkey is usually fed a diet which consists mostly of grain and corn. This means they are usually also consuming very large amounts of pesticides – as well as GMOs. These unhealthy elements can end up making their way into your body, as a result. 99% of the time, grain-fed meat is also lower in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) – as well as being much, much higher in omega-6.20,21 As I have covered previously, this is far from ideal.22

 

Make It More Colorful By Adding Vegetables and Fruits

The traditional Christmas dinner has the same old, regular line-up of vegetables – but it doesn’t necessarily have to be this way. Try making a super-nutritious salad, filled with cancer-preventing kale, spinach and broccoli.23,24,25,26 Or try some other nutritious sides, like yucca root, butternut squash soup or a Swiss chard salad. Let your imagination run wild here, and avoid the excess sugar and carb loads, which plague nearly every holiday meal.

 

Increase the Fat Content

Traditional holiday meals are also plagued with very low amounts of heart (and brain) healthy fats. Try making your big meal more Paleo, by adding healthy fats like extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil and avocados. Numerous scientific studies tout the myriad of health benefits shown, when consuming these fats.27,28,29,30,31,32 Dig in!

 

What about Dessert?

While it is very tempting to indulge in pumpkin pie or some other form of sweets after the big meal, it does not make sense, if you truly wish to stay healthy. I have written on the ills of sugar numerous times, and it is a much better idea to skip dessert, altogether.33,34 Plan a healthy activity for after dinner, like a short hike or run, that way you have something to look forward to. If you absolutely must indulge, pick a very high quality, organic dark chocolate. And keep your portion small!

 

Keep It Fun!

Ultimately, holiday meals are about being together with your loved ones. While consuming lots of carbohydrates can produce serotonin (a neurotransmitter closely related to your mood) – this is artificial.35,36,37,38 Find gratitude and happiness in your own life, and keep your holidays fun – not stressful! Remember to avoid caffeine as well (especially in excess), as it can make you more anxious and tense – which is the last thing you want during the stress-filled holidays.39,40

As you can see, you may have to give up some of your favorite holiday foods, but the health benefits of leaving these foods out, are definitely much better in the long run. In closing, I hope this guide has provided you with a plethora of good ideas, about having a much healthier Paleo meal, this holiday season. I wish you, and your loved ones, the best!

 

REFERENCES

[1]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/gluten-brain/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[2]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/celiac-disease-gluten-children/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[3]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/stop-settling-for-pseudo-health-and-say-no-to-pseudograins/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[4]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/are-potatoes-paleo/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[5]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/sweet-potatoes-paleo/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[6]Cordain L, Eaton SB, Sebastian A, et al. Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(2):341-54.

[7]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/dr-cordains-rebuttal-to-us-news-and-world-report/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[8]Frassetto LA, Schloetter M, Mietus-Synder M, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A: Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. Eur J Clin Nutr 2009.

[9]Jönsson T, Granfeldt Y, Ahrén B, Branell UC, Pålsson G, Hansson A, Söderström M, Lindeberg S. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study. Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:35

[10]Jonsson T, Granfeldt Y, Erlanson-Albertsson C, Ahren B, Lindeberg S. A Paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010 Nov 30;7(1):85

[11]Osterdahl M, Kocturk T, Koochek A, Wandell PE: Effects of a short-term intervention with a paleolithic diet in healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr 2008, 62(5):682-685.

[12]Forman J, Silverstein J. Organic foods: health and environmental advantages and disadvantages. Pediatrics. 2012;130(5):e1406-15.

[13]Chhabra R, Kolli S, Bauer JH. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(1):e52988.

[14]Crinnion WJ. Organic foods contain higher levels of certain nutrients, lower levels of pesticides, and may provide health benefits for the consumer. Altern Med Rev. 2010;15(1):4-12.

[15]Kamihiro S, Stergiadis S, Leifert C, Eyre MD, Butler G. Meat quality and health implications of organic and conventional beef production. Meat Sci. 2015;100:306-18.

[16]Epstein SS. The chemical jungle: today’s beef industry. Int J Health Serv. 1990;20(2):277-80.

[17]Pan A, Malik VS, Hu FB. Exporting diabetes mellitus to Asia: the impact of Western-style fast food. Circulation. 2012;126(2):163-5.

[18]Hemeda HM. Microbiological investigation and nutritional evaluation of selected fast food meat. J Egypt Public Health Assoc. 1995;70(1-2):105-26.

[19]Prayson B, Mcmahon JT, Prayson RA. Fast food hamburgers: what are we really eating?. Ann Diagn Pathol. 2008;12(6):406-9.

[20]Ponnampalam EN, Mann NJ, Sinclair AJ. Effect of feeding systems on omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and trans fatty acids in Australian beef cuts: potential impact on human health. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2006;15(1):21-9.

[21]Daley CA, Abbott A, Doyle PS, Nader GA, Larson S. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef. Nutr J. 2010;9:10.

[22]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/omega-3-vs-omega-6-rethinking-hypothesis/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[23]Van poppel G, Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA. Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;472:159-68.

[24]Maeda N, Matsubara K, Yoshida H, Mizushina Y. Anti-cancer effect of spinach glycoglycerolipids as angiogenesis inhibitors based on the selective inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. Mini Rev Med Chem. 2011;11(1):32-8.

[25]Verhoeven DT, Goldbohm RA, Van poppel G, Verhagen H, Van den brandt PA. Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996;5(9):733-48.

[26]Olsen H, Grimmer S, Aaby K, Saha S, Borge GI. Antiproliferative effects of fresh and thermal processed green and red cultivars of curly kale (Brassica oleracea L. convar. acephala var. sabellica). J Agric Food Chem. 2012;60(30):7375-83.

[27]Lawrence GD. Dietary fats and health: dietary recommendations in the context of scientific evidence. Adv Nutr. 2013;4(3):294-302.

[28]Feinman RD. Saturated fat and health: recent advances in research. Lipids. 2010;45(10):891-2.

[29]Farr SA, Price TO, Dominguez LJ, et al. Extra virgin olive oil improves learning and memory in SAMP8 mice. J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;28(1):81-92.

[30]Virruso C, Accardi G, Colonna-romano G, Candore G, Vasto S, Caruso C. Nutraceutical properties of extra-virgin olive oil: a natural remedy for age-related disease?. Rejuvenation Res. 2014;17(2):217-20.

[31]Lou-bonafonte JM, Arnal C, Navarro MA, Osada J. Efficacy of bioactive compounds from extra virgin olive oil to modulate atherosclerosis development. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012;56(7):1043-57.

[32]Visioli F, Bernardini E. Extra virgin olive oil’s polyphenols: biological activities. Curr Pharm Des. 2011;17(8):786-804.

[33]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/sugar-is-killing-us/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[34]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/neurobiology-sugar-cravings/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[35]Wurtman RJ, Wurtman JJ. Brain serotonin, carbohydrate-craving, obesity and depression. Obes Res. 1995;3 Suppl 4:477S-480S.

[36]Wurtman RJ, Wurtman JJ. Carbohydrate craving, obesity and brain serotonin. Appetite. 1986;7 Suppl:99-103.

[37]Fernstrom JD. Carbohydrate ingestion and brain serotonin synthesis: relevance to a putative control loop for regulating carbohydrate ingestion, and effects of aspartame consumption. Appetite. 1988;11 Suppl 1:35-41.

[38]Wurtman RJ, Wurtman JJ. Do carbohydrates affect food intake via neurotransmitter activity?. Appetite. 1988;11 Suppl 1:42-7.

[39]Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/caffeine-brain-part-1/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[40]Available at: //greatist.com/grow/negative-health-effects-of-caffeine. Accessed December 14, 2015.

Paleo Diet Guide to Keep Your Gut Healthy for the Holidays | The Paleo Diet

The Holidays are a time for office parties and get-togethers with family and friends with sleigh-fulls of delicious holiday foods!

Between the list of to-do’s, to-buy’s, to-make’s, to-call’s, to-rsvp’s and merrymaking aplenty, it’s all too easy to run yourself dry and put your health last. Not only can this concession ruin your holiday season if you get sick, but it can inevitably lead to a whole NEW list of problems that will take you more than just January to recover from.

Bloating, headache, gas, constipation, diarrhea, indigestion…we’ve all had one or more of these.  That second helping of turkey and fixings, just another dessert or two. While we convince ourselves and each other it’s no big deal, our “second brain” is always watching.  Each bite. Each mouthful. Each swallow.

This “second brain”1 is the gut’s network of 100 million neurons sending information from the stomach, through the intestines. The gut decides what to digest, absorb, excrete and, sometimes, send back, making us violently sick in the process. Dr. Gershon2, author of The Second Brain, said it best, “The brain doesn’t like to micromanage; it leaves the details of digestion up to the gut.”

And the gut takes its job very seriously.

So how do we get through all the merrymaking and celebrations with our loved family and friends without weight gain, bloating, sugar crashes and digestion problems while still managing to enjoy ourselves?  By following a few tips and tricks.

 

7 SIMPLE TIPS TO GET YOUR BRAIN AND GUT IN GEAR

1. Drink Enough Water

Your first stop when you get up in the morning should be the sink.  Fill the biggest glass you have with lukewarm water and squeeze a lemon into it for 3 seconds.  Drink it all, and refill, drinking a second glass (or as much of it as you can).

The combination of lukewarm water and freshly squeezed acidic lemon juice3 first thing in the morning wakes up the gut gently and helps with the digestive processes throughout the day. It’s a small change in your routine and especially important through hectic weeks over the holidays.

2. Sleep

This is always on everyone’s list to staying healthy, but who’s got the time? Here’s a little secret; we always have enough time, it’s just a matter of how we choose to spend it. Make the choice to leave a little early from the party, to politely say no to that after work happy hour, or skip that last store on the shopping list.

When our bodies don’t get enough sleep it becomes harder to focus, to function and to digest.4 While one or two nights with less sleep might not seem like a big deal, each one takes a toll on our bodies.  And remember the gut knows it all.

3. 50% Rule

Forget every food chart and plate diagram you’ve ever seen. To keep your gut healthy, your body, and in turn yourself happy, make it a rule to always fill at least half your plate with veggies.

Vegetables are easy to digest and great sources of carbohydrates and calcium, keeping you full longer. Between the holiday festivities and platters of food, gravitate toward the veggie tray – it’s a perfect match.

4. Alkaline Foods

Think Broccoli, kale, sweet potatoes, apples, berries.

Emotional stress is all too common during the holidays, and when combined with sugary foods, grains and processed meats the body’s overall pH decreases from its ideal (7.4)5 making absorption of minerals and nutrients more difficult for the gut.

To combat the harmful acidic environment that this creates in the body, include alkaline greens such as spinach, dates, oranges and grapefruit in your diet at least 3-5 times/week.  An alkaline pH in the body minimizes inflammation in the gut and allows for optimal stomach and intestinal health and function.6

5. Artichokes

To keep that gut healthy throughout the Holidays, it’s important to keep the ‘good’ bacteria of the gut lining in check and flourishing.

Artichokes are a Paleo approved food that fall into a group called prebiotics.7 Prebiotics like artichokes, bananas also fall into this category, contain indigestible nutrients that help feed the beneficial bacteria in your gut.8 By adding artichokes into your holiday meals, you’ll keep those good bacteria well fed and your gut healthy and happy.

6. The ONE Dessert Rule

This category is unfortunately where we tend to over-indulge most frequently, and the one place that is just loaded with sugars, margarines and grains almost always sending our gut into agony.

Just say no to the pastry, pies, and the processed. While the Paleo Diet prescribes an 85:15 Rule allowing for the occasional cheat or Paleo treat, we say go for the fruit platter! You’ll still get a chance to sample a variety without the unnecessary digestive problems when your gut works overtime.

7. Think ‘Balance’

The hardest to stick to during the holidays – it is often the most important.

To keep digestive disorders and irritabilities at bay, try to make the time to exercise at least 3 times/week (a brisk 20 minute walk is better than nothing!).

This will let you just fly through numbers 1-6 and enjoy the Holidays without indigestion and gut-related stresses like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, acid reflux and all the rest. Because nobody wants those as surprise gifts at Christmas dinner.

Happy Holidays, All!

@PaleoWired
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Sanja JovanovicSanja Jovanovic is a co-founder of PALEO WIRED – a site dedicated to GATHER the best and latest paleo recipes & information to share with you, to inspire you to EAT the deliciousness of those recipes and creations and to REPEAT each day.  Because we’re all going to eat something anyway, might as well make it something that our bodies will thank us for!

REFERENCES

[1] Gershon, M. D. The Second Brain: A Groundbreaking New Understanding of Nervous Disorders of the Stomach and Intestine. New York: HarperCollins; 1998. 336p.

[2] Ibid.

[3] “Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry”; Metabolism of Antioxidant in Lemon Fruit (Citrus limon BURM. F.) by Human Intesetinal Bacteria; Yoshiaki Miyake et al.; 1997.

[4] Chen CL, Liu TT, Yi CH, Orr WC. Evidence for altered anorectal function in irritable bowel syndrome patients with sleep disturbance. Digestion. 2011;84(3):247-51. PMID: 21952561.

[5]Koziolek M, Grimm M, Becker D, Iordanov V, Zou H, Shimizu J, Wanke C, Garbacz G, Weitschies W. Investigation of pH and Temperature Profiles in the GI Tract of Fasted Human Subjects Using the Intellicap® System.  J Pharm Sci. 2014 Nov 19. PMID: 25411065.

[6] Lallès JP. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase: novel functions and protective effects. Nutr Rev. 2014 Feb;72(2):82-94. PMID: 24506153.

[7] Ramnani P, Gaudier E, Bingham M, van Bruggen P, Tuohy KM, Gibson GR. Prebiotic effect of fruit and vegetable shots containing Jerusalem artichoke inulin: a human intervention study. Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):233-40. PMID: 20187995.

[8] Ibid.

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