Tag Archives: paleo recipes

Paleo Sandwich | The Paleo Diet

What’s for lunch?  For at least 49% of the U.S., it’s a sandwich. The common sandwich components, such as yeasted grain breads, cheese, and cured meats, are among the top contributors not only to sodium (accounting for at least one-fifth of the total daily sodium intake), but also to excess caloric consumption in the diets of adult Americans.1 Fortunately, the Paleo diet avoids the sandwich components that are added sodium-rich and offer empty nutrients.

There’s no disputing that whether you are pack a lunchbox or grab a quick bite on your lunch hour, sandwiches are popular because they are quick-and-easy. Subscribing to the Paleo diet doesn’t mean you still can’t enjoy convenience or the flavor profiles offered at your favorite deli. Check out our ideas for ways to turn your pre-Paleo favorite into a new Paleo staple.

Let’s start on the outside and explore the options for keeping the contents of your sandwich together.  You can use any of these Paleo wrap ideas for a variety of classic fillings, such as Paleo chicken salad, ground bison burgers, or to reinvent last night’s leftover roast beef.

Leafy Greens

Large, flat green leaves make excellent wrappers for all kinds of fillings – such as tacos, burgers, or Asian-style lettuce cups. Collard greens can be lightly steamed so that a tight wrap can be made, while Swiss chard and romaine both work well in their raw form.

Grilled vegetable slabs

Portobello mushrooms, eggplant slices, and bell peppers can be grilled or lightly roasted to create a solid platform that supports the inside of your sandwich. Although, you may find that these are neater to eat with a fork and knife.

Cauliflower “Bread”

The Real Paleo Diet Cookbook has a recipe for Cauliflower Cups made using a muffin tin, this recipe can be transformed by baking as a flatbread in the oven on a parchment lined backing sheet.  It could be topped with roasted tomatoes and eggplant and a drizzle of olive oil and makes an impressive open-faced vegetable sandwich.

We have recreated many classic sandwich options below with the same hearty taste and flavors, but reinvented into healthy Paleo diet compliant versions.

The Paleo Nut Butter & Jelly

With or without the crust, peanut butter (a legume) is not part of the Paleo diet. Fortunately, other spreads, such as sunflower seed or almond butter, are available to layer between thinly sliced apples or pears to replicate the flavor and convenience of this kid-friendly staple.  Serve with a side of dehydrated beet chips.

The Paleo Chicken Parmesan

Combine grilled chicken thighs with your favorite dairy-free Paleo pesto, such as a puree of basil, kale, toasted pine nuts, and olive oil. Top with sun-dried tomatoes and sautéed shiitake mushrooms and set on a large romaine lettuce leaf for added crunch. Serve with crispy, oven roasted, thin slices of zucchini.

The Paleo Cuban Sandwich

There’s no Paleo substitute for cheese, but in our take of this traditional Latin dish you won’t miss it. Melt in your mouth warm, citrus marinated, grilled, pork shoulder butt (blade roast), combined with Paleo Dijon-style mustard, sliced cucumbers, shredded raw purple cabbage, and avocado served on butter lettuce leaves. Served with a side of homemade plantain chips cooked in coconut oil.

The Paleo Bánh mì

There’s a lot of variation with the type of protein used to make a Bánh mì. However, the key is to find the proper balance between the spice, crunch, and tang of this Vietnamese recipe. Start with Paleo mayo (recipe available in The Paleo Diet Cookbook), thinly sliced jalapeno pepper, cilantro, minced garlic, julienne carrots and cucumber, with roasted pork belly, and a smear of dairy-free chicken liver pâté. Tuck the ingredients onto a Belgian endive leaf.

The Paleo Turkey Sandwich

The best part of Thanksgiving is making a leftover turkey sandwich. Thinly slice the roasted breast meat, top with a dollop of tangy, homemade cranberry relish, and serve between two sweet potato pancakes. Serve with a side of roasted Brussels sprout chips.

What’s your favorite Paleo sandwich combination? Post ‘em below!

REFERENCES

[1] Sebastian, Rhonda S., et al. “Sandwiches Are Major Contributors of Sodium in the Diets of American Adults: Results from What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 115.2 (2015): 272-277.

Ginger Tuna Ceviche

The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly the DHA and EPA varieties, are well documented and becoming well known.1 An estimated 17 percent of US adults consume fish oil supplements and since 2007, US fish oil sales have surged from $425 million to over $1 billion.2,3 While these figures are encouraging, more attention should be placed on omega-3 quality.

Because of their unique molecular structures, polyunsaturated fatty acids, including omega-3, are prone to oxidation.4 Heat, light, and oxygen can quickly degrade them, giving rise to harmful free radicals. Fish oil products vary considerably, but excessive oxidation is not uncommon.5

In general, whole fish provides better quality (less oxidized) omega-3 than extracted fish oils. Taking it one step further, raw fish provides better quality omega-3 than cooked fish. This doesn’t mean cooked fish is bad, but when raw fish opportunities present themselves, you shouldn’t hesitate. When your local supermarket has ultra-fresh tuna, mackerel, or wild salmon, for example, buy some and prepare a simple, delicious ceviche.

Ceviche hails from the coastal regions of Central and South America. Recipes vary, but most feature fresh fish, shrimp, squid, or other seafood marinated in citrus juices. Our recipe works for fatty fish and whitefish alike, but the kick of ginger pairs especially well with tuna. If you’re making ceviche with a stronger tasting fish like mackerel, you’ll want to add some diced onions and possibly forgo the ginger.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 2-3

  • 1 pound fresh tuna, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 2-inch piece of ginger, grated
  • 1 loose handful fresh parsley leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 loose handful fresh cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 small mild chili, finely diced
  • 1 lime, juiced (or 2 small limes)
  • Olive oil (for drizzling)
  • Freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

tuna-cev-1
Ingredients
6 item(s) « 1 of 6 »
 
Note: Supposing you’re preparing a takeaway lunch, you can contain the juices and olive oil in a Ziplock bag. Put all your chopped ingredients into a storage container and add the sealed Ziplock. Stir in the liquid ingredients when you’re ready to eat.

Thank you for reading,

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

 

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is a writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed book, Nutritional Grail.

References

1. Swanson, D., Block, R., & Mousa, S. A. (2012). Omega-3 Fatty Acids EPA and DHA: Health Benefits Throughout Life. Advances in Nutrition, 3(1), 1-7. doi:10.3945/an.111.000893

2. American Oil Chemists’ Society (AOCS). Omega-3 fatty acids: $13 billion global market. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from //www.aocs.org/Membership/FreeCover.cfm?itemnumber=17629

3. Doyle, K. (2013, December 16). Fish oil sales don’t reflect evidence. Reuters. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from //www.reuters.com/article/2013/12/16/us-fish-oil-sales-dont-reflect-evidence-idUSBRE9BF1DH20131216

4. Albert, B., Cameron-Smith, D., Hofman, P. L., & Cutfield, W. S. (2013). Oxidation of Marine Omega-3 Supplements and Human Health. BioMed Research International. (2013). Retrieved from //dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/464921

5. Halvorsen, B. L. & Blomhoff, R. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements. Food & Nutrition Research, 55, doi:10.3402/fnr.v55i0.5792

Calamari Salad | The Paleo Diet

We came across a delicious summer recipe on the back of a package of cooked, sliced calamari. With just a few modifications, we were able to substitute the necessary ingredients to make it pure Paleo. Calamari Salad is the perfect fresh dish to share on a warm evening with friends!

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 1 lb wild-caught sliced squid tentacles, precooked
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. white vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 sliced red or yellow pepper
  • 4 cups mixed green lettuce
  • 1 bunch cilantro leaves
  • 10 low sodium olives of your choice, rinsed and sliced
  • 1 fresh avocado
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • 2 large tomatoes

Directions

1. Combine calamari with olive oil, one teaspoon white vinegar and sliced pepper and set aside in serving bowl.

2. Toss together mixed greens and cilantro and spread evenly on large serving platter.

3. Add remaining ingredients to lettuce mixture.

4. When ready to eat, scoop squid mixture onto greens and toss together.

All the Best,

Lorrie Cordain, M.Ed., Co-Author of The Paleo Diet Cookbook

Have a recipe favorite you’ve modified? Share it with us in comments!

The Paleo Diet Recipe Library

Portobello Mushrooms | The Paleo Diet

We love to create new ways to prepare chicken, one of the more versatile meats enjoyed by Paleo Dieters. Chicken breasts with portobello mushrooms in white wine has recently become a favorite for its ease of preparation and the incredible flavor that comes from the infusion of just a few simple ingredients.

Ingredients

Serves 3-4

  • 4 free range organic chicken breast fillets, rinsed thoroughly
  • 2 cups organic, portobello mushrooms, rinsed and sliced
  • 1 cup organic marsala wine (don’t use cooking wine as it contains added salt)
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary, removed from stems
  • 1 small sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Freshly cracked pepper to taste

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375°

2. Place chicken breasts in baking dish and cover with mushrooms.

3. In a mixing bowl, combine wine, 3 tbsp extra virgin oil, red wine vinegar, and rosemary.

4. Saute onion and garlic with 1 tbsp extra olive oil in shallow pan until onions are tender.

5. Spread onions and garlic over chicken and mushrooms.

6. Pour liquid mixture over chicken making sure all pieces are well coated.

7. Bake for 45 minutes or until chicken is cooked.

The Paleo Diet Recipe Library

Easy Baked Kale Chips | The Paleo Diet

Kale is often touted to be one of the healthiest vegetables on the planet. It belongs to the Brassica family which includes cabbage, collard greens, and broccoli. Kale’s nutrient profile is outstanding when it comes to the antioxidant Vitamins A, C, and K. In fact, 1 cup of kale will supply your body with the 1180.1% of the %DV requirement for Vitamin K. It also has many sulfur-containing phytonutrients. When compared to all other vegetables Kale ranks superior in antioxidant concentrations.

If you’re following Paleo, consider incorporating this nutritious vegetable in your diet. Where to start with this leafy green? Give our baked kale chips a try – an easy baked, delicious snack to keep your hunger at bay.

Ingredients

Serves 3-4

  • 3-4 large leaves of kale (preferably organic)
  • 1 Tbsp Coconut or olive oil
  • Favorite Paleo spice medley

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350° F.

2. Rinse kale leaves and shred each leaf into chip-sized pieces, discarding the center stem.

3. In a Tupperware container, add coconut or olive oil and Paleo spices. I personally prefer sage, basil, red pepper flakes, black pepper, and oregano or thyme.

4. Seal container and toss ingredients until all leaves are fully coated.

5. Spread seasoned kale leaves on a non-stick cooking sheet. Make sure that each leaf is completely opened and not crumpled to ensure even cooking.

6. Place the kale chips in the oven and bake for 12 minutes or until crisp around the edges.

7. Remove the kale chips from your oven and place them in a bowl or plate to cool.

8. Enjoy!

 
Best,

Kyle Cordain, The Paleo Diet Team

Bison Roast | The Paleo Diet

We love a dish that keeps on giving. A crock pot, grass-fed bison roast does just that. Plenty for dinner and then some for lunches in the week to follow.

Ingredients

Serves 3-4

  • 1 grass-fed bison roast
  • 2 cups red wine
  • ¾ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 whole sweet onion thinly sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 – 2 inch spear fresh rosemary leaves with stem removed
  • 2 fresh basil leaves
  • 2 tsp. fresh oregano leaves

Directions

1. Rinse bison and place in large crock pot.

2. Combine remaining ingredients in large bowl and pour over bison.

3. Cook on low heat for 5-6 hours.

Kenny Cordain, The Paleo Diet Team

Eat Drink Repeat | The Paleo Diet

For most Paleo enthusiasts, managing meals while juggling our busy lives is key to our health and fitness. The Paleo Diet Team gives you the typical 24 hour dining experience from our family kitchen. From appetizers to dessert here’s a look at how to keep it real on a daily basis.

Eat. Drink. Repeat.

Let’s start with dinner, where the foundation of the cycle begins. Begin with an appetizer of fresh, organically grown veggies paired with wild, smoked salmon. Follow up with a Do-It-Yourself salad made with crisp, organic greens tossed with the toppings of your choice. By serving the toppings on the side, you can cover and save the leftovers in the fridge for your lunch the next day.

For the main meal, mix raw grass-fed beef or bison with rosemary, garlic and onions for barbecue ready patties.

The Paleo Diet

Slice up some organic carrots and beets, mix with salt-free veggie seasoning and stir fry on low heat with a little extra virgin olive oil.

The Paleo Diet

Finish your meal with a bowl of fresh, seasonal berries.

The Key: Prepare far more food than you and your family can possibly eat for dinner!

Cover and save in the fridge overnight.

Paleo Tip

For breakfast the following day, pull out the leftovers, reheat the patties, add the sides, and you have yourself a quick, healthy Paleo meal to launch your day. Pack the rest for lunch and you are off to work, ready to tackle your day. It’s that simple!

Eat. Drink. Repeat. | The Paleo Diet

All the Best,

Lorrie Cordain, M.Ed., Co-Author of The Paleo Diet Cookbook

Chocolate Covered Walnuts | The Paleo Diet

For a special occasion, chocolate covered walnuts are the decadent Paleo Diet treat you’ve been craving!

Ingredients

Serves 3-4

  • One 3.5 oz. bar raw dark chocolate (at least 85%, 99% if possible)
  • 20 raw, sprouted walnut halves, organic if possible
  • 12 large organic fresh strawberries

Directions

1. Place chocolate in double boiler pot on top of lower pot filled with water.

2. Bring water to simmer and stir chocolate with wooden spoon until melted.

3. Remove pot with chocolate from heat.

4. Using fork, dip one berry at a time into the chocolate and place on wax paper or silpat to cool.

5. Using same method, dip one walnut half at a time then place on wax paper to cool.

6. Dust with nutmeg, cinnamon or cayenne if desired.

7. Keep in tightly sealed plastic container for up to one week

How to Cook Steak | The Paleo Diet

Spring marks the start of warm weather, a welcome relief as the cold months of winter begin to fade away. For The Paleo Diet Team, this means it’s time to fire up the barbecue and get those sizzling steaks ready for a protein packed feast. Frequently we are asked to share our advice for the best method for cooking meat, especially beef or bison steaks. First, we want you to know that there are many great ways to prepare and cook this Paleo staple. Individual tastes and preferences should always be taken into consideration when planning a meal. While there isn’t a right or wrong way to cook a steak, there are certainly choices to be made for the health conscious to ensure that your end result is not only delicious, but good for you too.

The first step in this dining adventure is a trip to the grocery store. Be sure to select organic, grass-fed beef or bison. This will ensure that you are aligning your animal protein as close to that of our ancestors as possible. Once home, wash the steak with warm water and marinade in the fridge for at least 12 hours. There are many delicious and savory marinades found in The Paleo Diet Cookbook that enhance the flavors of beef or bison. Take your pick enjoy the delectable and savory results!

Once your steaks are infused with the exquisite, flavor enhancing spices and juices, you are ready for cooking. The most important consideration is choosing the healthiest cooking method. If barbecuing is your preference, a gas unit rather than a charcoal unit will be the best choice. Oven broiling works well, but tends to result in a more challenging clean up once the steaks are done. You may prefer cooking your steak on the stove in a pan, which can be done with a small amount of olive oil, or with left over marinade covering the surface of the pan.

Most importantly, however you choose to cook your meat, keep in mind this crucial rule of thumb: Meat should be cooked slowly, at low temperatures. Cooking meats at high temperatures results in the production of Advanced Glycation End-Product (AGE). Basically, that the beautiful, organic, grass-fed steak you so carefully prepare, becomes a potentially harmful protein source if cooked quick. Cook “Slow and Low” and avoid overcooking. Keep meat a bit on the rare side with no charring on the outside. This will ensure a wonderfully healthy outcome for your dining experience.

All the best,

Lorrie Cordain, M.Ed., Co-Author of The Paleo Diet Cookbook

Affiliates and Credentials