Tag Archives: Paleo Recipe

Slow Cooked Paleo Pork Ribs and Roots

Paleo pork ribs, cooked slowly to perfection, are truly one of the most delicious foods out there. For too long, however, they’ve unrightfully demonized as an unhealthy food. Because they contain saturated fat, many institutions are still advancing the outdated and disproven theory that saturated fat increases your risk for heart disease.

Recently, for example, Claire Hewat, the CEO of the Dietitians Association of Australia, wrote an opinion piece for the Newcastle Herald in which she expressed several opinions contrary to the science behind the Paleo diet. Among her list of “healthy fats,” she includes both sunflower and canola oil, both of which contain significant quantities of inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids.1

Hewat contends that “too much saturated fat increases one’s risk for heart disease,” and recommends replacing foods containing saturated fat with those containing unsaturated fat. Technically, she’s right because too much of anything is unhealthy, but the scientific literature doesn’t support extreme reductions of dietary saturated fat. To the contrary, saturated fat, from both plant and animal foods, consumed in accordance with Paleo diet principles, is health supportive.

Also, it’s important to dispel the myth that pork and other animal fats are solely saturated fat; they’re actually proportionately higher in unsaturated fat. Lard, for example, is roughly 41% saturated fat, 47% monounsaturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. Tallow is about 50% saturated, 46% monounsaturated, and 4% polyunsaturated.

Besides containing healthy varieties and quantities of fat, pork ribs are also rich in B-vitamins, zinc, selenium, and protein.

Try our Slow Cooked Paleo Pork Ribs and Roots recipe, paired with a fresh garden salad, for a delicious, nutritious, complete Paleo meal.

INGREDIENTS

    • 2-3 lbs. pork ribs
    • 4 cloves garlic, pressed
    • 1 large white onion, cut into half-moon slices
    • 3-4 turnips, cut into large-bite chunks
    • 3-4 carrots, cut into large-bite chunks
    • 1 tbsp allspice
    • 2 cans diced tomatoes (BPA-free, no-salt added)
    • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
    • Freshly milled black pepper

DIRECTIONS

slow-cooked-ribs1
1. Cut the rib rack into pieces of 2-3 ribs each. 2. Bring a nonstick pan to medium heat and cook the ribs about 5-10 minutes per side until they brown slightly.
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

 

REFERENCES

[1] Hewat, Claire. (Mar 30, 2015). OPINION: Myths and legends of food. Newcastle Herald. 

Red Meat, Insulin Sensitivity, and Sage Infused Mushroom Paleo Burgers | The Paleo Diet

Does red meat consumption increase your risk for developing type-2 diabetes? Some epidemiologic studies have suggested this much, while also linking increased dairy consumption with decreased type-2 diabetes risk.1 Insulin sensitivity is the proposed mechanism driving these associations.

People with low insulin sensitivity, also known as being insulin resistant, require greater amounts of insulin from the pancreas to stabilize blood glucose levels. Over time, insulin resistance promotes type-2 diabetes as the pancreas fails to satisfy the body’s insulin requirements. This causes excess glucose to build up in the bloodstream, thereby promoting type-2 diabetes.

Previously published epidemiological studies have led to the hypothesis that increased red meat consumption promotes lower insulin sensitivity, whereas increased dairy consumption promotes higher insulin sensitivity. This hypothesis, however, has not been tested via randomized controlled trials, until now.

For a study recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers tested three different diets on 47 overweight or obese men and women.2 The diets included a) a diet high in red meat with minimal dairy, b) a diet high in dairy with no red meat, and c) a diet with no red meat, nor any dairy. Each participant followed each diet for a period of four weeks.

Until now, few intervention studies have evaluated red meat and dairy for their effects on insulin sensitivity in the absence of weight loss. The researchers, therefore, designed this study to maintain weight stability so as to isolate the effects of red meat and dairy on insulin sensitivity. Their primary hypothesis was that the red meat diet would produce greater insulin resistance (lower insulin sensitivity) compared to the high-dairy diet.

To their surprise, the opposite happened. Fasting insulin was significantly higher after the high-dairy diet compared to the red meat diet. There was no change in fasting glucose, which means the high-dairy diet promoted greater insulin resistance (lower insulin sensitivity) than the red meat diet.

These findings run contrary to the hypothesis that red meat consumption increases your risk for type-2 diabetes. Red meat, as those who follow the Paleo lifestyle know, is an invaluable source of high-quality protein and fat, as well as various vitamins and minerals. Continue eating it and should you be short on inspiration, our Sage Infused Mushroom Burgers are an excellent place to start!

SAGE INFUSED MUSHROOM BURGERS

Ingredients

  • 1 lb lean ground beef
  • ¼ lb mushrooms
  • 2 tbsp fresh sage, chopped finely
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 4 tbsp olive oil, divided
  • Freshly milled black pepper

DIRECTIONS

sage-mushroom-burger5
1. Wash the mushrooms and chop them into quarters. 2. Place them on a baking sheet and roast at 350°F for 15 to 20 minutes, or until they reduce by half.
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Turner, KM, et al. (Mar 2015). Red meat, dairy, and insulin sensitivity: a randomized crossover intervention study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(3). Retrieved from //ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2015/03/25/ajcn.114.104976.abstract

[2] Ibid. Turner

Paleo Plantain Cakes w. Cacao Frosting | The Paleo Diet

Here’s a simple, fun recipe for flourless plantain Paleo cakes. Not to be confused with bananas, plantains are starchy fruits, which must be cooked before eating.

When you go to the grocery store, you may find green or yellow plantains. Pick up the yellow ones and look for lots of black lines and spots, resembling an overly ripe banana. This is what we want for this recipe.

INGREDIENTS

Plantain Cakes
  • 1 medium-size ripe plantain (about 1.5 cups, roughly cut pieces)
  • 4 dates, pitted and chopped
  • 3 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 eggs
Cacao Frosting
  • 8 dates, pitted
  • ¼ cup coconut milk
  • ¼ cup raw cacao powder

DIRECTIONS

plantain-paleo-cake-1
1. Peel the plantain and chop it roughly.
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*Use the arrows in the lower gray bar of this image-viewer to move left or right through the directions. We recommend using one of following approved browsers for optimal viewing quality: Mozilla Firefox, Safari, or Google Chrome.
 

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

Spicy Salmon | The Paleo Diet

Spicy salmon with avocado and yams balances your omega-3 intake with healthful fats. Nothing beats a little heat to ring in the sizzling summer season.

Ingredients

Serves 1-2

  • 1/3 Salmon fillet, skinned
  • Basil, Thyme, Rosemary, Oregano, Sage, chopped
  • Black Pepper, Red Pepper Flakes
  • 3-4 Garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • ½ Medium onion, diced
  • 1 Jalapeno pepper, chopped
  • Coconut or Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Avocado
  • 1 Medium yam or sweet potato
  • Green chile sauce or salsa Optional

Directions

1. Dice yam into .5 x .5 inch sections.

2. Heat 1 tbsp coconut or olive oil in a Cast Iron pan on Low.

3. Stir in diced yams, and brown edges, ensuring they do not burn. Yams tend to cook slower than the salmon, so if you timed this recipe correctly, both the salmon and yams should finish cooking at the same time.

4. In a second Teflan pan, combine garlic, jalapenos and onions with 1 tbsp of coconut or olive oil.

5. Add salmon fillet and sprinkle chopped basil, thyme, oregano, rosemary, sage, and black and red pepper over the salmon fillet, to taste.

6. Break up salmon with a spatula and distribute spices and ingredients evenly.

7. Cook salmon until flaky.

8. Garnish with diced avocado and a generous serving of Paleo-approved green chili sauce or salsa.

9. Side Note: Freshly brewed green tea complements this meal very well!

10. Bon appétit!

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