Tag Archives: ketogenic diet

Both the keto diet and the paleo diet are all the rage right now, with many people choosing one or the other in an effort to change their eating habits, get healthier, and be better able to enjoy their lives. For many people, however, it can be difficult or even confusing to understand the differences between the two and how to manipulate their eating habits in order to achieve their goals. If you’re thinking about a drastic lifestyle change, consider how going paleo compares to going keto–and how those dietary changes can impact your life.

The Similarities

Both the keto diet and the Paleo Diet@ focus on reducing carbohydrate consumption. While the paleo diet aims at eating primarily the foods that would have been found in an earlier, caveman-era period of the human diet, the keto diet restricts carbs in an effort to send the body into ketosis, a state in which the body burns ketones for fuel. Ketones are derived from our fat stores. The carb restriction in both diets often leads to quick weight loss, especially early after making a dietary change. This carb restriction, however, often causes Keto and Paleo to be lumped into the same category–which can in turn be highly confusing for dieters. Both diets also restrict sugar and legumes and encourage dieters to consume diets high in animal protein and healthy fats.

The Differences

In order to choose the diet that’s right for you, it’s important to understand the key differences between keto and paleo.

Difference #1: Keto Relies Heavily on Macronutrient Balance

The keto diet works by keeping your body in that state of ketosis: the state at which, instead of burning carbohydrates for energy, the body swaps over and begins burning stored fat, instead. In order to maintain ketosis, it’s necessary to eat a diet high in healthy fats, moderate in protein, and extremely low in carbohydrates. The Paleo Diet, on the other hand, allows you to balance your macronutrients according to your personal needs.

Difference #2: The Paleo Diet Focuses on Removing Foods that are Hard to Digest

One of the key attributes of the paleo diet is its restriction of items like processed foods, dairy, and sugar, all of which can be difficult for the body to digest. Swapping to a paleo-based diet can help reduce inflammation throughout the body and lead to increased gut health. The keto diet, on the other hand, allows–and in some cases even encourages–full-fat dairy consumption.

Difference #3: The Paleo Diet Encourages Whole, Healthy Foods

The focus of the paleo diet is on eating whole, healthy foods that are good for your body and will give you the fuel you need to accomplish your daily tasks. The keto diet, on the other hand, primarily focuses on keeping your body in ketosis.

Difference #4: The Keto Diet is Unforgiving

Everyone ends up having a cheat day or a slip-up every now and then. That barbecue sauce turned out to have sugar in it that you weren’t anticipating; you didn’t know your soup had barley; you ended up eating a slice of birthday cake that wasn’t appropriate for your diet. On the keto diet, that means you’ll instantly fall out of ketosis and start over on your dietary approach. The paleo diet, on the other hand, doesn’t rely on a state that takes days or even weeks to achieve in order to meet your goal.

Which One is Right for You?

To learn more about the ketogenic diet and why we feel it is not a healthy diet for the long term, check out this thorough article by Dr. Loren Cordain.

For most people, the Paleo Diet is a great choice for improving overall health and sticking with a health-centered diet that will help reduce inflammation and make weight loss easier. The paleo diet doesn’t require regular counting and calculations; instead, it sets you up for success by providing you with a list of the foods that you should be avoiding and a list of the foods that can help you meet your dietary goals. The paleo diet also focuses heavily on removing highly processed foods that are difficult to digest, while many people who adhere to a keto diet choose to dodge some of the restrictions by consuming artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy dietary additions that can actually make it harder to lose weight.

The keto diet was originally intended to help manage a range of medical conditions, including epilepsy. The high-percentage weight loss is a side effect that many people enjoy, but it wasn’t its original intent. The paleo diet, on the other hand, takes people back to the diet that they were originally intended to eat, and brings a number of health benefits with it. By understanding the paleo diet more fully, you’ll discover that it can be a highly effective way to meet your dietary goals.  Most importantly, it is the diet you were intended to eat for a lifetime of optimum health.

 

Gilbert's Syndrome: Can a Paleo Diet Reverse An Irreversible Condition?

Gilbert’s Syndrome (GS) is a relatively common condition characterized by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a naturally occurring yellow pigment that forms when red blood cells break down. GS is a genetic condition whereby a single gene mutation prevents the liver from properly removing bilirubin from the blood. Between 5 – 10% of the population may have GS, but around one-third don’t have symptoms.1

Normally, when red blood cells reach the end of their approximately 120 day life span, they break down into bilirubin. The liver then processes the bilirubin, readying it for elimination. Bilirubin gives urine its yellow tinge and stools their dark brown color. For those afflicted by GS, however, the liver sometimes processes bilirubin at a slower rate. Buildups can occur, sometimes resulting in jaundice (a yellowing of the eyes and skin).

GS is regarded as common and harmless, but is associated with numerous unpleasant symptoms, including fatigue, itching, gastrointestinal symptoms, and increased risk for gallstones. Because it’s a hereditary condition, scientists have generally presumed there is no cure. But could the Paleo diet or other dietary interventions help?

A Hungarian researcher team started investigating this question several years ago. Just this month, they published their findings in the American Journal of Medical Case Reports.2 While their study involved just one patient, the researchers were successful in reversing her GS symptoms.

In 2006, doctors diagnosed the patient, then 30 years old, with GS. At that time, she had a 10 year history of frequent migraines (about three/month) and a 10 year history of dermatitis. She also exhibited persistent fatigue, constipation, and yellowing of the eyes.

In 2010, she began with the Paleo diet, excluding dairy, grains, legumes, refined carbohydrates, and vegetable oils. After one year, her bilirubin levels returned to the normal range, her jaundice and constipation resolved, and her migraines reduced to roughly one every two months. Her fatigue and dermatitis, however, persisted.

She followed the standard Paleo diet for a total of 20 months. On the advice of the researchers, she then switched to a ketogenic version of the Paleo diet. Ketogenic diets, of course, involve greatly reduced carbohydrate consumption. Her Paleo-keto diet, which she maintains to this day, includes mostly animal fat, meat, eggs, organ meats, and less than 30% vegetables and fruit. At least twice per week she consumes organ meats. Since beginning her Paleo-keto diet, her fatigue has disappeared, as has her dermatitis. Her migraines have further reduced to roughly twice per year.

Of course, this n=1 study doesn’t prove the Paleo/Paleo-keto diet cures GS. Nevertheless, the study is significant because it’s the first documented case of successfully treating GS through dietary intervention. This study could potentially open the door to larger studies, which could test the hypothesis that Paleo/Paleo-keto can cure GS (or greatly mitigate its symptoms). And on an individual level, GS patients, with the help of their physicians, could implement Paleo/Paleo-keto principals and perhaps improve their conditions.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Owens, D, et al. (June 1975). “Population studies on Gilbert’s syndrome.” Journal of Medical Genetics, 12(2). Retrieved from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1142378

[2] Tóth, C, and Zsófia, C. (April 2015). “Gilbert’s Syndrome Successfully Treated with the Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet.” American Journal of Medical Case Reports, 3(4). Retrieved from //pubs.sciepub.com/ajmcr/3/4/9/

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Ketogenic Diet | The Paleo Diet

Many are aware that ketogenic diets offer a plethora of health benefits.1,2,3,4,5 Among the ketogenic diet’s best properties are its anti-inflammatory effects.6,7 However, despite the emerging popularity of the diet, the scientific community is still relatively uncertain about the exact beneficial mechanisms behind this dietary approach.8,9,10 Recently however, a new study was published which looked at the potential mechanisms underlying the specific anti-inflammatory properties of ketosis.11

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Ketogenic Diet | The Paleo Diet

Eitel, Julia. “Innate Immune Recognition and Inflammasome Activation in Listeria Monocytogenes Infection.” Frontiers. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2015.

For those unfamiliar, a ketogenic diet is one which contains very little – if any – carbohydrate.12 One classic example of this dietary approach is seen in the Inuit people.13 The Inuit are indigenous people, who live in the Arctic region.14 Alaska, Canada and Greenland all have Inuit populations.15 In one of the more famous nutrition stories of recent times, Dr. Vilhjalmur Stefansson ate nothing but meat for one year, after being inspired by living with the Inuit, and seeing their remarkably low rate of disease.16,17,18 This was despite the Inuit’s (then) controversial diet of nothing but meat, whether it came from fish or other sources. Stefansson saw no ill effects from a year of an all meat diet, with basically zero carbohydrate. He also consumed no vegetables. It is worth noting, that he also became very ill when he consumed only low fat meat, and nothing else. When he added the fattier meat back in, he immediately felt better.

The many reported benefits of the ketogenic diet include, but are not limited to: less hunger while dieting, improved cognitive function in those who are cognitively impaired, improved LDL cholesterol levels, improved weight loss, and improved levels of HDL cholesterol.19 This is in addition to the aforementioned anti-inflammatory effects. When we look to the scientific literature, we see that the anti-inflammatory nature of the diet has been studied for many years.20,21,22,23,24 The ketogenic diet has also been established as an adequate anticonvulsant therapy.25

This newly published research looks specifically at the ketone metabolite beta-hydroxybutyrate, which seems to inhibit the NLRP3 inflammasome.26 Since the NLRP3 inflammasome was previously found to have been linked to obesity and inflammation, as well as insulin resistance, inhibiting it would make mechanistic sense.27 The resultant weight loss and anti-inflammatory effects, commonly seem (at least anecdotally) when adopting a ketogenic diet, would then make sense as well. The NLRP3 inflammasome also drives the inflammatory response in several disorders including autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, and autoinflammatory disorders.28,29

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Ketogenic Diet | The Paleo Diet

Kossoff, Eric H. “More Fat and Fewer Seizures: Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy.” The Lancet. N.p., July 2014. 

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Ketogenic Diet | The Paleo Diet

Menu, P, and J E Vince. “The NLRP3 Inflammasome in Health and Disease: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.” Clinical and Experimental Immunology 166.1 (2011): 1–15. PMC. Web. 19 Feb. 2015.

Could it all be so simple? Possibly, though there is certainly likely more to be more scientific discoveries, relating to the beneficial effects of this specific dietary approach. Moving away from glucose and instead utilizing ketone bodies as a source of metabolic fuel, results in many profound changes, of which we are only beginning to scratch the surface of, scientifically.30,31,32

This new discovery will likely be the first of many new findings regarding the ketogenic diet, and its abundance of benefits. If you are looking to adopt a ketogenic approach, simply follow the many nutritious tenets of the Paleo Diet, and then lower your carbohydrate intake to below 100g per day. How low you need to go for optimum quality of life is highly variant, and many people report different results with different amounts of carbohydrates. Dialing in the best nutrition plan for you, when adopting a ketogenic diet, is integral. Be sure to consult with a professional to avoid possible nutrient deficiencies.

 

REFERENCES

[1] Dashti HM, Mathew TC, Hussein T, et al. Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients. Exp Clin Cardiol. 2004;9(3):200-5.

[2] Paoli A. Ketogenic diet for obesity: friend or foe?. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014;11(2):2092-107.

[3] Zajac A, Poprzecki S, Maszczyk A, Czuba M, Michalczyk M, Zydek G. The effects of a ketogenic diet on exercise metabolism and physical performance in off-road cyclists. Nutrients. 2014;6(7):2493-508.

[4] Hussain TA, Mathew TC, Dashti AA, Asfar S, Al-zaid N, Dashti HM. Effect of low-calorie versus low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet in type 2 diabetes. Nutrition. 2012;28(10):1016-21.

[5] Millichap JG, Yee MM. The diet factor in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Pediatrics. 2012;129(2):330-7.

[6] Schugar RC, Crawford PA. Low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets, glucose homeostasis, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2012;15(4):374-80.

[7] Masino SA, Kawamura M, Wasser CD, Wasser CA, Pomeroy LT, Ruskin DN. Adenosine, ketogenic diet and epilepsy: the emerging therapeutic relationship between metabolism and brain activity. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2009;7(3):257-68.

[8] Poff AM, Ari C, Seyfried TN, D’agostino DP. The ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy prolong survival in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(6):e65522.

[9] Krilanovich NJ. Benefits of ketogenic diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;85(1):238-9.

[10] Mandel A, Ballew M, Pina-Garza JE, Stalmasek V, Clemens LH. Medical costs are reduced when children with intractable epilepsy are successfully treated with the ketogenic diet. J Am Diet Assoc 2002;102:396–8.

[11] Youm YH, Nguyen KY, Grant RW, et al. The ketone metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease. Nat Med. 2015;

[12] Rogovik AL, Goldman RD. Ketogenic diet for treatment of epilepsy. Can Fam Physician. 2010;56(6):540-2.

[13] Phinney SD. Ketogenic diets and physical performance. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2004;1(1):2.

[14] Bjerregaard P, Dewailly E, Young TK, et al. Blood pressure among the Inuit (Eskimo) populations in the Arctic. Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(2):92-9.

[15] Helgason A, Pálsson G, Pedersen HS, et al. mtDNA variation in Inuit populations of Greenland and Canada: migration history and population structure. Am J Phys Anthropol. 2006;130(1):123-34.

[16] Stefansson V: Not by bread alone. The MacMillan Co, NY 1946. Introductions by Eugene F. DuBois, MD, pp ix-xiii; and Earnest Hooton PhD, ScD, pp xv-xvi.

[17] McClellan WS, DuBois EF: Clinical calorimetry XLV: Prolonged meat diets with a study of kidney function and ketosis. J Biol Chem 1930, 87:651-68.

[18] McClellan WS, Rupp VR, Toscani V: Clinical calorimetry XLVI: prolonged meat diets with a study of the metabolism of nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus. J Biol Chem 1930, 87:669-80.

[19] Pérez-guisado J. [Ketogenic diets: additional benefits to the weight loss and unfounded secondary effects]. Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2008;58(4):323-9.

[20] Yang X, Cheng B. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory activities of ketogenic diet on MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. J Mol Neurosci. 2010;42(2):145-53.

[21] Masino SA, Kawamura M, Wasser CD, Wasser CA, Pomeroy LT, Ruskin DN. Adenosine, ketogenic diet and epilepsy: the emerging therapeutic relationship between metabolism and brain activity. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2009;7(3):257-68.

[22] Gasior M, Rogawski MA, Hartman AL. Neuroprotective and disease-modifying effects of the ketogenic diet. Behav Pharmacol. 2006;17(5-6):431-9.

[23] Kim do Y, Hao J, Liu R, Turner G, Shi FD, Rho JM. Inflammation-mediated memory dysfunction and effects of a ketogenic diet in a murine model of multiple sclerosis. PLoS ONE. 2012;7(5):e35476.

[24] Masino SA, Ruskin DN. Ketogenic diets and pain. J Child Neurol. 2013;28(8):993-1001.

[25] Bough KJ, Rho JM. Anticonvulsant mechanisms of the ketogenic diet. Epilepsia. 2007;48(1):43-58.

[26] Youm YH, Nguyen KY, Grant RW, et al. The ketone metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease. Nat Med. 2015;

[27] Vandanmagsar B, Youm YH, Ravussin A, et al. The NLRP3 inflammasome instigates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Nat Med. 2011;17(2):179-88.

[28] Menu P, Vince JE. The NLRP3 inflammasome in health and disease: the good, the bad and the ugly. Clin Exp Immunol. 2011;166(1):1-15.

[29] Zhou R, Yazdi AS, Menu P, Tschopp J. A role for mitochondria in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Nature. 2011;469(7329):221-5.

[30] Guzmán M, Blázquez C. Ketone body synthesis in the brain: possible neuroprotective effects. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2004;70(3):287-92.

[31] Laffel L. Ketone bodies: a review of physiology, pathophysiology and application of monitoring to diabetes. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 1999;15(6):412-26.

[32] Henderson ST. Ketone bodies as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease. Neurotherapeutics. 2008;5(3):470-80.

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