Tag Archives: kale

Smoothies have become a popular drink across all generations, and we are often asked if these concoctions adhere to The Paleo Diet® ingredient guidelines. Learning how to check the ingredients before imbibing is key, and of course making your own is the most fool proof way to ensure your smoothie is fully Paleo. There’s really nothing complicated about it and the results are a delicious and nutritious treat to satisfy your hunger without sacrificing your health. This original recipe from our team is packed with flavor and nutritious ingredients. From prep to done, it takes about five minutes. Just throw the ingredients in your blender and power it up!

If you’re looking for something a little lighter, we also just posted a Paleo Apple Pomegranate Lemonade Recipe right here!

Tip: To serve cold, substitute ½ cup crushed ice for ½ cup of the recommended water.

 

Spicy Kale and Cucumber Smoothie

Kale and Cucumber Kick

  • 1 whole English cucumber
  • 6 stalks celery
  • 1 green apple
  • 1 yellow bell pepper
  • 2-3 sprigs cilantro (optional)
  • 1 jalapeno
  • 1 inch peeled ginger root
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • 2 cups water

 

Spicy Kale and Cucumber Smoothie

Spicy Kale and Cucumber Smoothie

While our hunter-gatherer ancestors may have relied on hunting and foraging to satisfy their needs, we couch-sitting contemporaries can have groceries delivered to the curb. This may be a significant innovation in terms of convenience, but the loss of physical activity in modern life has cost us dearly in more ways than one. Maintaining a small garden is a great way to get some exercise and fresh air. Besides, any gardener will tell you that for taste, nutritional quality and value, there’s no substitute for growing your own food. Here are five Paleo Diet® essentials to easily grow at home:

 

Beets

Rich in folate, manganese, and dietary fiber, these vibrant tubers are packed with energy and rich in flavor. Eaten raw, beets add unique color and texture to salads. Roasted, they are sweet and earthy. Beet greens are delicious and packed with antioxidants. Beets grow well in cooler weather but can be planted in early spring, late summer, and early autumn for multiple harvests each year.

 

Cucumbers

These crunchy summer staples are so easy to grow they practically grow themselves. Cooling and fresh, this veggie scores lower on the glycemic index than almost any other. You can enjoy them in a salad, smoothie, or eat them sliced and dipped in your favorite Paleo dip as a snack. Plant the seeds at the end of spring near a trellis, fence, or other structure for optimal production.

 

Kale

This superstar of the nutrient-dense veggies is simple to grow and a half-dozen plants will provide you with more dark, leafy goodness than you can imagine. You can get more than your daily recommended amounts of vitamins A, C and K from one cup of chopped kale. Kale is one of the most versatile greens: great raw in salads and smoothies or sauteed, steamed, or cooked on its own or as a side dish. For best results, you’ll want to sow seeds in the final months of summer or plant starts in the garden in early autumn. Once your kale is well-established in the garden, simply trim off the older, outer leaves as you need them for a continuous harvest.

 

Peppers

There are few greater pleasures than fresh, homegrown peppers, especially if you find grocery store varieties a bit repetitive. When you grow your own peppers, you can experiment with varieties from all over the globe to see which suit your fancy. Loaded with vitamin C, peppers are a perfect Paleo food: They can be eaten raw, grilled, stuffed and more. Starting from a seed can be a little tricky as peppers need warm weather to germinate. You may have better luck starting seeds in pots in a sunny window in the spring and transferring the plants into the garden once the risk of frost has passed.

 

Broccoli

There’s a reason your mom made you eat your broccoli. It’s loaded with folic acid, potassium, fiber, and Vitamin C. While President George H.W. Bush hated it, this green is a staple for anyone looking to include a lot of vegetables in their diet. This superfood can be served cooked, raw or in a crudités with a dip. Broccoli also thrives best in cool weather with lots of sun and moist soil. Plant it in late summer to reap the best harvest.

 

These are just a few of the Paleo essentials you can easily grow at home. Even if you don’t have a spot for a garden in your yard, you may want to consider seeking out a community garden plot near you. Walking or cycling to your garden brings you even closer to a hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Whichever path you find toward growing your own Paleo fare, you’ll thank yourself for it every step of the way.

Almond Lime Kale Salad

During the past several years, kale has become a favorite “superfood” vegetable around the world. Despite its meteoric rise to prominence, kale has always been a favorite food of farmers because it grows fast, resists frost, and requires very little fertilizer.1 Kale is a winter vegetable, so now is a great time to start including it in your meals.

Nutritionally speaking, kale is a rock star, boasting high amounts of beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin K. It’s also a rich source of phytonutrients, including the flavonoid kaempferol. Epidemiological studies associate kaempferol consumption with reduced rates of several degenerative diseases and numerous preclinical studies have shown kaempferol to have a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective.2

In this recipe, we’re pairing kale with almonds. Like all seeds, almonds contain phytic acid, a chelating “antinutrient” with a propensity for binding with calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc, thereby inhibiting the absorption of these critical minerals.3 You can reduce the phytic acid by soaking the almonds in water for at least eight hours or, preferably, 24. From a culinary perspective, this also improves the taste and texture of the almonds.

Helpful hint: Soak one or two cups of almonds, then discard the soaking water, pat-dry the almonds with a kitchen towel, and store them in your refrigerator for 5 – 7 days. Not only will you always have some handy for a recipe, but also for a quick, nutritious snack.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 1

  • 3 – 4 kale leaves
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed
  • ½-inch piece of ginger, finely chopped
  • ½ cup almonds, soaked at least 8 hours
  • ½ lime, juiced
  • 2 tbsp olive oil

DIRECTIONS

kale-and-almonds4
Remove and discard the stems from the kale leaves. Chop leaves into bite-sized pieces.
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

 

references

1. Straight, K. (July 20, 2014). Rub of the Greens. ABC News. Retrieved from //www.abc.net.au/landline/content/2014/s4049600.htm

2. Calderón-Montaño, JM, et al. (April 2011). A review on the dietary flavonoid kaempferol. Mini Reviews in Medical Chemistry, 11(4). Retrieved from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21428901

3. Torre, M, et al. (1991). Effects of dietary fiber and phytic acid on mineral availability. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 30(1). Retrieved from //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1657026

Easy Baked Kale Chips | The Paleo Diet

Kale is often touted to be one of the healthiest vegetables on the planet. It belongs to the Brassica family which includes cabbage, collard greens, and broccoli. Kale’s nutrient profile is outstanding when it comes to the antioxidant Vitamins A, C, and K. In fact, 1 cup of kale will supply your body with the 1180.1% of the %DV requirement for Vitamin K. It also has many sulfur-containing phytonutrients. When compared to all other vegetables Kale ranks superior in antioxidant concentrations.

If you’re following Paleo, consider incorporating this nutritious vegetable in your diet. Where to start with this leafy green? Give our baked kale chips a try – an easy baked, delicious snack to keep your hunger at bay.

Ingredients

Serves 3-4

  • 3-4 large leaves of kale (preferably organic)
  • 1 Tbsp Coconut or olive oil
  • Favorite Paleo spice medley

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350° F.

2. Rinse kale leaves and shred each leaf into chip-sized pieces, discarding the center stem.

3. In a Tupperware container, add coconut or olive oil and Paleo spices. I personally prefer sage, basil, red pepper flakes, black pepper, and oregano or thyme.

4. Seal container and toss ingredients until all leaves are fully coated.

5. Spread seasoned kale leaves on a non-stick cooking sheet. Make sure that each leaf is completely opened and not crumpled to ensure even cooking.

6. Place the kale chips in the oven and bake for 12 minutes or until crisp around the edges.

7. Remove the kale chips from your oven and place them in a bowl or plate to cool.

8. Enjoy!

 
Best,

Kyle Cordain, The Paleo Diet Team

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