Tag Archives: ghee

The Paleo Diet Digest

FAQJust choosing the diet you want to follow can be a tough choice when there are so many options and opinions being thrown at you from the news, internet and your friends. So, if you’ve made the choice to go with the Paleo Diet® the last thing you want to now deal with is different answers to what the diet is and how to follow it.

Here’s the ten most common questions we’ve been asked by people interested in the diet but still trying to figure out what it’s all about. We’ll give you our take on each.

And yes, we’re sure you’re going to hear other opinions. Someone has probably already told you that ghee is Paleo or you need to drink milk to get your calcium. All we can say in response is that we are the originators of the Paleo Diet. Our founder, Dr Loren Cordain, wrote The Paleo Diet which defined the diet. So, while we’re always open to discussion and debate, when it comes to defining the Paleo Diet, we are technically the only ones who can give you these answers.

We truly hope this answers your questions!

— The Paleo Diet Team



1. Can I be Paleo if I’m vegetarian?
Vegetarian Diet | The Paleo Diet
The simple answer is no. We are designed to be omnivores and there are essential nutrients that we can only get from animal sources. That said, we do understand that some people don’t want to eat meat for ethical reasons. We admire those choices and will always strive to help those of you to eat as healthy a diet as possible. To get you started check out:

Transitioning from vegetarian to Paleo
Vegetarian and vegan diets: nutritional disasters


2. How fast will I lose weight on Paleo?
It’s hard to say as this depends on your current diet. However, we don’t think of diets just in terms of losing weight, nor do we consider rapid weight loss to be healthy. We prefer looking at The Paleo Diet as a way of life and investing in your overall health. Achieving a healthy weight is just a consequence of eating a healthy diet. Here’s a few articles about losing weight on a Paleo Diet:

Weight loss on a Paleo Diet
Lose weight and keep it off


3. Are gluten-free grains Paleo?
No, they are not. All grains are excluded from the Paleo Diet due to their low nutrient density and high content of many anti-nutrients including saponins and lectins in many grains. Check out these articles to read a little more about grains:

The gluten-free trend and its implications for Paleo
Millet: a gluten-free grain you should avoid
Quinoa and saponins: Dr.-Cordain responds to a reader’s questions


4.
How do I get enough calcium on Paleo?
The Paleo Diet® is nutritionally balanced, in line with the optimal nutrient ratios eaten by our Paleolithic ancestors. The only nutrient where the Paleo Diet does not meet the RDA guidelines is calcium, however, Dr Cordain has already demonstrated that those levels of calcium are not achievable on a natural diet. Yet our ancestors showed no signs of osteoporosis. Likewise, the recent increased rates in heart disease in women has been at least partially attributed to excess calcium intake. Here’s a little more information about calcium:

How to get enough calcium
September series: all about calcium
Promoting calcium balance health on a Paleo Diet (easier than you think)


5. Is Paleo low carbohydrate/high protein & fat?
While it is a lower carbohydrate diet than a typical Western diet, it is not a very low carbohydrate diet. The bulk of the food you eat are fruits and vegetables. These contain plenty of carbohydrates. More importantly, on a healthy Paleo Diet, the focus is on eating the right foods and not on macronutrient ratios. Learn a little more about our thoughts on macronutrient ratios:

Forget the macronutrient ratios: you are what you were designed to eat
Nutrition divided: low-fat vs. high-fat diet
Do low carb diets really provide better weight loss?


6. How will I get enough fiber without grains?
Cereal Grains | The Paleo DietThe best diets are about a mix of the right foods that provide the nutrients you need instead of looking for some “super-food” that’s high in fiber or some other nutrient. Fruits and vegetables, which are the bulk of your food on a Paleo Diet, all contain fiber and will not only meet your daily requirements, but provide them over the course of the day.

Forget the macronutrient ratios: you are what you were designed to eat


7. What is the Paleo diet?
Foods in a Healthy Paleo DietThe Paleo Diet® is eating the foods that humans have evolved to eat. Here’s a few good summaries of the Paleo Diet to get you started:

The Paleo Diet premise
The Paleo Diet: designed by nature, built by science


8. What to eat and not to eat on the Paleo diet?
Eat the foods that are most similar to the natural foods available to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. This includes fruits, vegetables, sea food, eggs, grass-fed free-range lean meats, and nuts sparingly. These also happen to be the most nutrient dense foods you can eat. Here’s a few guides to help you pick what you should eat:

What to eat on the Paleo Diet?
Your Paleo answers – most common FAQ about the Paleo Diet
Debunking the biggest myths about the Paleo Diet


9. How do I stay Paleo when eating out?
Pre-packed Airport SnackPlanning is key. Look up the menu beforehand. Salads with grilled meats, vegetable dishes, and lean meats are good options. Most restaurants will consider your needs so ask them to exclude ingredients that are not Paleo. When all fails follow the 85-15 rule. Following the Paleo Diet 85 percent of the time will still allow your body to experience the metabolic and physiologic benefits it offers. This rule permits you flexibility to eat differently 15 percent of the time, or roughly three meals over the course of a week. All that being said, travel can be particularly difficult, so here’s a few articles to help:

Staying on track with the Paleo Diet while traveling
Hunter-gatherers in flight: how to pack, snack, and forage strict-Paleo when traveling by air


10. Is ghee butter, goat’s milk, coffee, and beer Paleo?
Ghee | Paleo DietNone of these are Paleo, thought coffee is in a bit of a grey area. However, this doesn’t mean you can’t ever enjoy them. That’s why we have the 85-15 rule. Here’s a series of articles on frequently asked about foods that generally are not Paleo:

Coffee drinking revisited: its not Paleo but are there any therapeutic benefits?
The truth about the coffee-cancer link
Coffee: is it Paleo?
How Paleo is beer and mead?
The Paleo Diet, alcohol consumption and sulfites in wine, beer, and food
Gee, what’s the skinny on ghee?
Dairy: milking it for all it’s worth
Hormones in milk

Ghee | Paleo Diet

Released from The Insider Vault: What’s the Skinny on Ghee?

I’m often asked is ghee Paleo? If you are not familiar with ghee, it comes from the Sanskrit word ghrita, meaning bright, and is clarified butter fat in which most of the water has been boiled off and the nonfat solids removed by continued heating, filtration, or decanting the remaining oil mixture.1 Traditional societies in India and elsewhere have produced and consumed ghee since at least 1500 BC.1

HOW IS IT MANUFACTURED?1

  1. Milk butter or desi method
  2. Direct cream method
  3. Cream butter method
  4. Pre-stratification method

All four commercial procedures to produce ghee rely upon heating at temperatures from 105° to 118° C to remove the water.1

Ghee typically contains milk fat (99 to 95%), water (< 0.5%) and protein (0.1%). The butter fat remaining in ghee after boiling and removal of nonfat solids contains saturated fatty acids (53.9 to 66.8%), polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (22.8 to 38%), free fatty acids bound to albumin (1-3%), and cholesterol (0.15 to 0.30%).1, 2

In 1987, Jacobson first pointed out that ghee contained high concentrations (12.3%) of oxidized cholesterol, otherwise known as oxysterols.3 He suggested that consumption of ghee, with its high levels of oxidized cholesterol, by Indian immigrant population living in the UK likely represented an important dietary risk factor for atherosclerosis and heart disease.3 In subsequent years, it has been conclusively demonstrated in human, animal and epidemiological studies that dietary intake of oxidized cholesterol accelerates the rate of atherosclerosis or the hardening of the arteries, as well as increasing the size of the arterial plaque.4, 5, 6 Hence because of their atherogenic, cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects, oxidized cholesterol food products are almost universally recommended to be reduced or minimized in our diets.7, 8, 9

The final aspect of the ghee story that requires further scrutiny is the high concentration (12.3%) of oxidized cholesterol that Jacobson initially reported in
1987.3 This value has been questioned because of the analytical procedures that were used to measure the oxidized cholesterol.9 More recent studies suggest this
high value may have been incorrect.9, 10, 11

Fresh butter and cream samples contain barely detectable concentrations of oxidized cholesterol, whereas ghee manufactured at temperatures below 120°C contained 1.3% oxidized cholesterol.10, 11

Whether or not regular consumption of oxidized cholesterol at this lower concentration can still induce atherosclerosis in humans is currently unknown. However, part of the problem with ghee is that it is frequently used to fry food or is re-used many times in cooking foods. Both of these procedures are known to increase oxidized cholesterol to levels known to cause atherosclerosis in animal models.4 Foods fried in ghee may contain 7.1% oxidized cholesterol, whereas intermittently heated ghee contains 8.1 to 9.2% oxidized cholesterol.10

My advice is to skip ghee altogether and replace it with virgin olive oil for Paleo cooking and in salads.

 

References

1. Sserunjogi ML, Abrahamsen RK, Narvhus J. A review paper: Current knowledge of ghee and related products. Int Dairy J. 1998;8:677–88.

2. Sarojini JK, Ubhayasekera SJ, Kochhar SP, Dutta PC. Lipids and lipid oxidation with emphasis on cholesterol oxides in some Indian sweets available in London. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2006 Nov-Dec;57(7-8):451-8.

3. Jacobson MS. Cholesterol oxides in Indian ghee: possible cause of unexplained high risk of atherosclerosis in Indian immigrant populations. Lancet. 1987 Sep 19;2(8560):656-8.

4. Soto-Rodríguez I, Campillo-Velázquez PJ, Alexander-Aguilera A, Rodríguez-Estrada MT, Lercker G, Garcia HS. Biochemical and histopathological effects of dietary oxidized cholesterol in rats. J Appl Toxicol. 2009 Nov;29(8):715-23

5. Staprans I, Pan XM, Rapp JH, Feingold KR. The role of dietary oxidized cholesterol and oxidized fatty acids in the development of atherosclerosis. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2005 Nov;49(11):1075-82.

6. Staprans I, Pan XM, Rapp JH, Moser AH, Feingold KR. Ezetimibe inhibits the incorporation of dietary oxidized cholesterol into lipoproteins. J Lipid Res. 2006 Nov;47(11):2575-80.

7. Otaegui-Arrazola A, Menéndez-Carreño M, Ansorena D, Astiasarán I.Oxysterols: A world to explore.Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Dec;48(12):3289-303.

8. Hur SJ, Park, GB, Joo ST. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in animal products. Food Control 2007;18:939-947.

9. Sieber R. Oxidised cholesterol in milk and dairy products. Int Dairy J 2005;15:191-206.

10. Kumar, N. and Singhal, O. P. (1992), Effect of processing conditions on the oxidation of cholesterol in ghee. J. Sci. Food Agric., 58: 267–273.

11. Kumar MV, Sambaiah K, Lokesh BR. Effect of dietary ghee–the anhydrous milk fat, on blood and liver lipids in rats. J Nutr Biochem. 1999 Feb;10(2):96-104.

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