Tag Archives: fat loss

4 Paleo Cornerstones to Increase Your Metabolism | The Paleo Diet

Many individuals who are desperate to lose weight do not realize that they can – and should – eat lots of calories.1, 2, 3 Crash diets do not work, when it comes to long term fat loss.4, 5 In fact, they usually have the opposite effect – weight and fat gain.6, 7, 8 There are, however, some very easy tricks to incorporate into your routine to help ramp up your metabolism.

However, as a disclaimer, if you’re after a quick fix to mimic the effects of steroids or other illegal drugs, you’ll be looking at a harsh reality dead in the eyes. These drugs are dangerous, and are illegal for a reason.

Follow these simple, easy steps to hone in on the last 10% to push you over the edge and help you lose those few extra stubborn pounds!

4 Paleo Cornerstones to Increase Your Metabolism | The Paleo Diet

Mullur, Rashmi, Yan-Yun Liu, and Gregory A. Brent. “Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism.” Physiological Reviews. American Physiological Society, 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 2 June 2015.

1. KEEP CALORIES IN CHECK

Make sure you are eating plenty of calories. Skip the starvation diets and/or “cleanses” please. Secondly, make sure that you are including “good” calories, and leaving out “bad” ones. This means making your diet as nutrient dense as possible, which the Paleo diet will accomplish for you automatically (I told you this was easy!). Leaving out the “bad” calories can be trickier, but you simply choose between avoiding ice cream and achieving their weight loss goal, or downing a pint and keeping those extra pounds. Ultimately, the choice is yours.

2. EAT QUALITY OVER QUANTITY

Of these quality calories, protein is probably the most important.9, 10 Most of us do not eat enough protein, and the more protein we eat, the more satiated we will be and the more muscle we can build – both important cornerstones of true weight loss.11, 12 Thermogenesis requires adequate protein – as does muscle growth.13 Without protein, you will never become leaner and meaner.

3. FATTEN UP

The next step (which is so commonly overlooked) is indulging in lots of healthy fats.14 This means extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, avocados and other Paleo Diet staples.

4. SLEEP IT OFF

One of the biggest secrets to fat loss, is so simple, and yet so overlooked. As I’ve previously written, getting enough sleep is absolutely vital to fat loss.15 In fact, sleep deprivation will cause fat gain!16 Getting an appropriate amount of sleep may be the most unrecognized and underreported secret to fat loss – and yet so many of us struggle to achieve it.17 Why is this? Examine your lifestyle and see what you can strip away (another secret to fat loss – eliminate activities and stressors – don’t add them!)

So to review, boost your metabolism and get rid of stubborn body fat by getting enough calories (quality here is vital), eat plenty of quality proteins and fats, and get lots of high quality sleep (8-9 hours per night). These four Paleo cornerstones will ramp up your metabolism and help you lose body fat.

4 Paleo Cornerstones to Increase Your Metabolism

Mullur, Rashmi, Yan-Yun Liu, and Gregory A. Brent. “Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism.” Physiological Reviews. American Physiological Society, 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 2 June 2015.

Perhaps two more key notes should be mentioned here. The first is to avoid sugar at all costs. Sugar is your enemy when it comes to fat loss.18 1-2 servings of fruit are all you usually need, and it’s vital (if you want to lose fat) to keep your carbohydrate intake to starchier sources, like sweet potatoes.

The second key is to give it time! Weight loss does not happen overnight – it really does take patience. I have had so many clients who have given up after a week of not achieving their goal, which is truly heartbreaking. I know that if they were to simply hold on for another few weeks, they would see very good results, and stick with it.

A Paleo diet and lifestyle will provide you with all the tools you need to maximize your metabolism and lose weight.19, 20 If you have very complex metabolic or health issues to deal with, you may need to see a doctor or practitioner, but this isn’t always necessary.

Go home, get rid of all the processed and man-made foods from your house, keep exercising and sleeping, and reap the rewards of a Paleo-driven, fuel-efficient metabolism!

 

REFERENCES

[1] Purnell JQ. Obesity: Calories or content: what is the best weight-loss diet?. Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2009;5(8):419-20.

[2] Finer N. Low-calorie diets and sustained weight loss. Obes Res. 2001;9 Suppl 4:290S-294S.

[3] Kowalski LM, Bujko J. [Evaluation of biological and clinical potential of paleolithic diet]. Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2012;63(1):9-15.

[4] Kline GA, Pedersen SD. Errors in patient perception of caloric deficit required for weight loss–observations from the Diet Plate Trial. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2010;12(5):455-7.

[5] Kelley DE, Wing R, Buonocore C, Sturis J, Polonsky K, Fitzsimmons M. Relative effects of calorie restriction and weight loss in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1993;77(5):1287-93.

[6] Shah M, Miller DS, Geissler CA. Lower metabolic rates of post-obese versus lean women: Thermogenesis, basal metabolic rate and genetics. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1988 Sep;42(9):741-52.

[7] Bray GA: Effect of caloric restriction on energy expenditure in obese patients. Lancet 1969; 2:397-398

[8] Keys, Ancel. The Biology of Human Starvation: Volume I. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1950. Print.

[9] Westerterp-plantenga MS, Lemmens SG, Westerterp KR. Dietary protein – its role in satiety, energetics, weight loss and health. Br J Nutr. 2012;108 Suppl 2:S105-12.

[10] Brehm BJ, D’alessio DA. Benefits of high-protein weight loss diets: enough evidence for practice?. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2008;15(5):416-21.

[11] Westerterp-plantenga MS, Nieuwenhuizen A, Tomé D, Soenen S, Westerterp KR. Dietary protein, weight loss, and weight maintenance. Annu Rev Nutr. 2009;29:21-41.

[12] Clifton PM, Keogh JB, Noakes M. Long-term effects of a high-protein weight-loss diet. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;87(1):23-9.

[13] Acheson KJ, Blondel-lubrano A, Oguey-araymon S, et al. Protein choices targeting thermogenesis and metabolism. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(3):525-34.

[14] Brehm BJ, Seeley RJ, Daniels SR, D’alessio DA. A randomized trial comparing a very low carbohydrate diet and a calorie-restricted low fat diet on body weight and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003;88(4):1617-23.

[15] Available at: //thepaleodiet.com/sleep-loss-making-fat/. Accessed May 30, 2015.

[16] Spivey A. Lose sleep, gain weight: another piece of the obesity puzzle. Environ Health Perspect. 2010;118(1):A28-33.

[17] Durmer JS, Dinges DF. Neurocognitive consequences of sleep deprivation. Semin Neurol. 2005;25(1):117-29.

[18] Kuo LE, Czarnecka M, Kitlinska JB, Tilan JU, Kvetnanský R, Zukowska Z. Chronic stress, combined with a high-fat/high-sugar diet, shifts sympathetic signaling toward neuropeptide Y and leads to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008;1148:232-7.

[19] Boers I, Muskiet FA, Berkelaar E, et al. Favourable effects of consuming a Palaeolithic-type diet on characteristics of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled pilot-study. Lipids Health Dis. 2014;13:160.

[20] Masharani U, Sherchan P, Schloetter M, et al. Metabolic and physiologic effects from consuming a hunter-gatherer (Paleolithic)-type diet in type 2 diabetes. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015;

The BEST Fat Loss Diet in The World | The Paleo Diet

It’s officially 2015, the New Year is upon us and with it many resolutions to lose weight and get into shape. With so many magazines and websites filled with latest fad diets, how do you know what diet really works best? The good news is the scientific research is actually quite clear with respect to the ‘best diet’ for not only promoting fat loss but also improving your overall health.

A low-carb diet (LC), or its cousin the very low-carb ketogenic diet (VLCK), are head and shoulders above the rest when it comes to promoting weight loss and upgrading your health. A low-carb diet is typically classified as a diet consisting of 100g of carbs or less per day, whereas a very low-carb ketogenic diet is generally 50g of carbs or less. (It’s called a ketogenic diet due to the ketone body by-products produced when the body switches over to primarily fat- burning for fuel.)

Practically, adopting a LC or VLCK diet entails decreasing your intake of starchy carbohydrates while increasing your consumption of tasty lean proteins, healthy fats, nutrient-dense veggies and whole fruits.

For some this might be a whole new approach to eating, for others something you’ve experimented with in the past. How do low-carb and very low-carb ketogenic diets work to promote weight loss? There are numerous physiological mechanisms at play. Let’s take a closer look.

A low-carb diet dramatically improves your blood sugar control and the function of your blood sugar hormone insulin.1 After you eat a meal, insulin’s job is to get the sugars from your bloodstream into your cells.  The more overweight or out of shape you are, the greater the amount of insulin your body produces to get the job done. This leads to higher insulin levels in the blood, which directly blocks your capacity to burn fat via the hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) enzyme. This person would be called insulin insensitive and if the condition persisted they would eventually become insulin resistant and develop type-II diabetes.

How does this relate to carbohydrates? Carbohydrates exert the greatest impact on your insulin output, therefore by reducing your carb intake (and increasing your consumption of healthy proteins and fats) you’ll improve your body’s insulin sensitivity or efficiency at shuttling the food you eat into your cells where it can be used for energy.

A recent meta-analysis in the British Journal of Nutrition of 1,400 people adopting a very low-carb diet showed significant reductions in bodyweight, as well as lower triglycerides and improved good HDL cholesterol.2 Another study in the New England Journal of Medicine of 322 obese patients revealed that the low-carb group on an unrestricted calorie diet lost more weight than subjects on a calorie-restricted low fat diet, or a Mediterranean diet.3 The beauty of a low-carb diet for weight loss is that you don’t have to bother counting calories and you’ll still see results.

It’s not just the hormone insulin contributing to all the positive outcomes. Low-carb diets increase your body’s satiety signals via the increase in protein consumption and improved efficiency of the satiety hormone leptin.4,5 Low-carb diets also trigger greater lipolysis – the breakdown of body-fat – as your body shifts to burning fat as a primary fuel source.6 There is also an increase in the metabolic cost of producing glucose (gluconeogenesis) when on a low-carb diet, which requires your body to burn more energy and translates into a slimmer waistline and better health for clients.7

A Paleo dietary approach fits perfectly with a low-carb or very low-carb ketogenic diet due to the inherently higher intake of lean proteins, healthy fats, and abundant vegetables.  The natural elimination of grains on a Paleo diet quickly and easily reduces your total carb intake (although it’s important to remember that not all Paleo diets need to be low-carb, particularly in athletes). The goods news is you’re replacing the nutrient poor starchy grains with nutrient-dense veggies and fruits. This promotes not only superior weight loss but better overall health.

The latest research shows a low-carb diet also comes with a myriad of other health benefits, such as; improved blood pressure, triglycerides, cardiovascular health, cognitive function, and reduced inflammation.8,9,10 These are profound and dramatic changes that stem from simply eating more in-tune with how your body has evolved. (Not even best drugs in the world could improve these parameters so significantly!)

So, why isn’t everyone who is overweight or out of shape on a low-carb Paleo diet? Unfortunately, even many old diet and nutrition myths still persist in doctor’s and dietician’s offices across the country.

One of the most common mistakes is avoiding saturated fats for fear they will worsen a patient’s cardiovascular health. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, studies continue to pour out of the scientific literature confirming that your dietary intake of saturated fat does NOT impact your blood levels. In fact, the study goes on to show that carbohydrates are the real culprits (if you are overweight or out of shape), increasing blood levels of saturated fats alongside a key marker associated with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type-2 diabetes.11 In short, cut the carbs to get your health and bodyweight back on track.

Now that you know why a low-carb diet is best way to lose weight and improve your health, the next step is implementing the diet into your day-to-day routine.

If you are new to the Paleo diet or have a lot of weight to lose, start out slow and scale up. Remember, whether you’re just starting out or have been following Paleo for sometime, our 85:15 Rule permits the inclusion of three ‘cheat’ meals per week, where you can loosen the rules, not feel too restricted, and ease into the Paleo lifestyle.

Here is a sample day of meals for beginners with recipes to get you started!

By following this approach many will lose weight gradually, feel satiated and content, and not compromise health or performance at work or in the gym.

Make 2015 a year to remember, transform your body and mind with a low-carb Paleo diet and unlock your weight loss and performance potential.

REFERENCES

[1]Ballard, K et al.Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitiv­ity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.Nutr Res.2013 Nov;33(11):905-12.

[2]Bueno, N et al.Very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet v.low-fat diet for long-term weight loss: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.Br J Nutr.2013 Oct;110(7):1178-87.

[3]Shai I, Schwarzfuchs D, Henkin Y, et al. Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet. N Engl J Med 2008;359:229-41.

[4]Veldhorst M., Smeets A., Soenen S., Hochstenbach-Waelen A., Hursel R., Diepvens K., Lejeune M., Luscombe-Marsh N., Westerterp-Plantenga M. Protein-induced satiety: Effects and mechanisms of different proteins. Physiol. Behav. 2008;94:300–307.

[5]Sumithran P., Prendergast L.A., Delbridge E., Purcell K., Shulkes A., Kriketos A., Proietto J. Ketosis and appetite-mediating nutrients and hormones after weight loss. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 2013;67:759–764

[6]Cahill G.F., Jr. Fuel metabolism in starvation. Annu. Rev. Nutr. 2006;26:1–22.

[7]Tagliabue A., Bertoli S., Trentani C., Borrelli P., Veggiotti P. Effects of the ketogenic diet on nutritional status, resting energy expenditure, and substrate oxidation in patients with medically refractory epilepsy: A 6-month prospective observational study. Clin. Nutr. 2012;31:246–249.

[8]Perez-Guisado, J.Munoz-Serrano A.A pilot study of the Spanish Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: an effective therapy for the metabolic syndrome.J Med Food.2011 Jul-Aug;14(7-8):681-7.

[9]Crane P.et al.Glucose Levels and Risk of Dementia.NEJM.Sept 2013 Vol 369.

[10]Heilbronn LK et al. Energy restriction and weight loss on very low-fat diets reduce C-reacctive protein concentrations in obese, healthy women. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2001;21:968-970.

[11]Volk B et al. Effects of Step-Wise Increases in Dietary Carbohydrate on Circulating Saturated Fatty Acids and Palmitoleic Acid in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome. Plus ONE 2014, Nov 21:1-16.

Lower Cholesterol and Lose Weight | The Paleo Diet

Dr. Cordain,

I was stunned a year ago when my doctor mentioned that I should lose some weight. Compared with most Americans, I thought I rated on the thin side, except for a gut that refused to melt after I quit smoking, for the first time, about 15 years ago.

I probably wouldn’t have tried to lose weight, except that the idea of the Paleo-type dietary regimen seemed to make sense, gut or no.

For me, it wasn’t as though I had been a slouch physically. After quitting smoking the second time, about eight years ago, I started building a healthier lifestyle. I cut back on red meat, started limiting fast food, added more vegetables, legumes and lots more fish to my diet and started a moderate weight-lifting routine. With in-line skating, bicycling, canoeing, kayaking and lots of walking, I figured I already did enough cardio.

Then I read Loren Cordain’s book The Paleo Diet. Following it strictly on weekdays and more loosely on weekends, I cut back dramatically on grain and dairy products, and quit adding salt or sugar to anything. As with my religion, I simply tried to get it mostly right but forgave myself easily.

The hardest thing to give up was wheat grain. It never had dawned on me how often most of us eat wheat, especially refined grain such as pasta, pastries and white bread. I still allowed myself whole-wheat toast and jam on weekends.

My diet primarily became three heaping bowls of fresh vegetables daily, lots of fresh and frozen fruits, especially berries, plus sardines, salmon and low-sodium turkey. Sparkling water became my beverage of choice, but I also had plain water, coffee and unsweetened tea. Sugary soft drinks didn’t pass my lips. Wine and the occasional martini did.

Within two weeks I was down 9 pounds. Within six weeks I was down 15, to 150 pounds. Over the next couple of months I drifted even further down to 145 and plateaued there. At a height of 5 foot 7, that still –unbelievably – puts me on the high end of my ideal Body Mass Index, at 22.7, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nevertheless, my gut vanished, leaving me with a waistline I haven’t seen since college: 30 inches, down from 34 when I first went mostly Paleo four months ago. All obvious fat under the skin is gone.

My cholesterol after three months on the diet was a total of 153, with HDL at 60 and LDL at 76. By most measures, that’s fantastic. My highest reading in total cholesterol was about 220 right before I quit smoking the second time.

Now my energy level seems boundless. My weight-lifting goals in repetitions are much easier to reach than before. Even running, which I never really cared for, is fun.

Maintaining the diet has become easier, once I figured I could find all the vegetables and fruits I want on nearly any salad bar. Trips to the grocery store still tend to feel like an alien experience, but I’ve learned to ignore all my previous loves, especially Lucky Charms.

In fact, now I burn excess calories simply by rolling my eyes at all the processed foods that are offered to us as sustenance.

Oh, yeah, I’ve also gotten a little preachy.

Ross Werland
Chicago Tribune staff reporter

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