Tag Archives: autoimmune disease

Ulcerative Colitis Remission | The Paleo Diet

Born into an Italian-American family, it was inevitable that I fall in love with food. Fresh mozzarella, homemade pasta, and a crusty piece of Italian bread were components of an average meal. But my passion for food was not limited to Italian cuisine. I used to pride myself on my pie eating and Twinkie eating contest wins. Then there was that one week I ate nachos for dinner seven days straight. And I could drink craft beer like a disturbingly large German man.

I never had a weight problem and, in fact, I never had a problem period. I thought I had an iron stomach. That was, until March 2013.

One Saturday evening I decided I needed to go to the ER for dehydration and some other alarming digestive symptoms. A grueling week later and a few tests a 25-year-old should never have to endure, I finally had a colonoscopy. My gastroenterologist diagnosed me with severe Ulcerative Colitis (pancolitis).

As soon as I woke up from anesthesia my doctor informed me I had a lifelong autoimmune disease. My colon was basically attacking itself by creating ulcers and making it impossible for me to function properly. After giving me a diagnosis I asked my doctor a question that would change my life.

“Is there anything I should be eating or avoid eating to help aid this disease?”

His response was that there is no scientific proof which links the two but that he’s had a patient go into remission with the help of the Paleo Diet.

Hospital bracelet still on my wrist and groggy from the anesthesia, my amazingly supportive mother drove me to the grocery store. We bought Paleo food and removed all grains, dairy, gluten, legumes, and sugar from my apartment.

My gastroenterologist now has two patients who have stayed in remission with help from the Paleo Diet.

Since then I have devoted myself to the Paleo lifestyle. Although I work full time, my life is consumed with eating clean and inspiring others through my blog mangiapaleo.com. I even recently started CrossFit to take my health to a whole new level.

HOW PALEO HAS CHANGED ME:

  • My skin developed a glow. It also cleared up my Grannuloma Annulare (an autoimmune skin condition) that I have had on my arm for 14 years.
  • My everlasting lower belly fat disappeared.
  • My nails rarely break and are very strong.
  • My hair got shiner and grew longer.
  • A friend also commented on how white and bright my eyes looked.
  • Paleo also gave me more energy which has brought me to join CrossFit Strongtown.
  • I can think clearly and my mood is almost always positive.
  • Most importantly, my Ulcerative Colitis symptoms were tamed. My flare up went into remission with the help of medication, but stayed in remission because of my Paleo lifestyle.

Paleo keeps my Ulcerative Colitis from restricting my life. My restart button is no longer to run straight to the doctor; it’s to cook some bone broth and troubleshoot my digestion with nutrients and paleo food. Once I figured this out I was able to really change my lifestyle to a more comfortable one.

I hope to inspire others with gastrointestinal issues or Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis. It is my aim to pave the way for others who are struggling with their health. So, I recently started a blog mangiapaleo.com to help spread awareness of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and eating clean.

Laura
@mangiapaleo

Lupus | The Paleo Diet

Hello Dr. Cordain,

I hope this finds you in good health. Prior to 2009 I lost 100lbs and began my career as a fitness professional teaching cycling classes and helping others reach their weight loss goals. 2009 I was diagnosed with Lupus and went into total kidney failure. I spent 8 weeks living a Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC and some how made a miraculous recovery.

Of course I was put on lots of medication and had to go through a sort of chemo for about a year afterwards. Now I find myself struggling to lose the weight I gained back after being on prednisone for years. Now I’m battling moments of depression and exhaustion despite still teaching my cycling classes and trying to eat “healthy.” Also, I’m still taking prednisone but my dose is only 5mg now.

I’ve finally been cleared by my kidney doctor to start taking in more protein and I immediately thought of Paleo. Can you give me a little more insight as to how Paleo may help me? Nobody around me eats this way, including the people I live with, so I would be doing this all alone. But, in my gut, I believe it might be the answer I’ve been looking for. Hope to hear from you soon. Take care.

Anonymous

Dr. Cordain’s Response:

First, let me say that my heart goes out to you for the health problems you have been experiencing associated with your diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). I am not a clinical practitioner, but rather a University Researcher studying diet and autoimmunity. Accordingly, I suggest that you consult a variety of health care professionals who are familiar with SLE, autoimmunity and The Paleo Diet. Competent health care personnel can work with you individually and over time to regularly monitor your signs and symptoms of SLE, your blood chemistry and your overall health if you decide to adopt The Paleo Diet.

The Paleo Diet may help to reduce or even cause remission of autoimmune disease symptoms in certain autoimmune conditions. Our international research group believes that contemporary Paleo diets may be therapeutic for some autoimmune disease patients for a number of reasons. First, this nutritional program eliminates a number of foods which may increase intestinal permeability. Evidence from our laboratory (1) as well as more recent data (2, 3) suggests a “leaky gut” may represent an important environmental/dietary factor which triggers autoimmune disease in genetically susceptible patients.

As with The Paleo Diet for all people, I suggest autoimmune subjects reduce or eliminate cereal grains, particularly gluten containing grains (wheat, rye and barley). Cereal grains contain a number of compounds which may increase intestinal permeability including gliadin (a storage protein found in gluten containing grains), lectins (particularly a lectin called wheat germ agglutinin [WGA] found in wheat, and thaumatin like proteins, as well as other compounds.

Over the past two decades, SLE has frequently been reported to present simultaneously with celiac disease (4-6), an autoimmune intestinal disease caused in genetically predisposed patients by consumption of gluten containing grains. Both SLE and celiac patients share the genetic markers (HLA B8 and DR3) which increase disease susceptibility. Further a recent study indicated that 7 of 24 SLE patients exhibited anti-gliadin antibodies, the same antibodies to gluten containing grains found in celiac patients. A number of case reports have shown that gluten free diets had beneficial and favorable effects in SLE patients (6, 7). Accordingly, the preliminary evidence suggest that SLE patients should adopt gluten free diets.

Check out my former graduate student, good friend and colleague, Robb Wolf’s website and read about an SLE patient who beat the disease with Paleo. There is absolutely no risk to gluten free diets like The Paleo Diet, and the potential for improved health is high (8-15).

Other foods which are not on The Paleo Diet menu are dairy products, legumes, processed foods, refined sugars and vegetable oils. All of these items may adversely affect intestinal function or interact with the immune system in a manner that may promote allergy or autoimmunity. For details about these and other dietary elements that compromise intestinal function see my latest book, The Paleo Answer.

Finally, autoimmune patients may also want to read Egg Whites and Autoimmune Disease which suggests eggs and nightshades sometimes interact with the immune system to promote or aggravate allergy and autoimmunity.

Cordially,

Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Professor

References

1. Cordain L, Toohey L, Smith MJ, Hickey MS. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. British Journal of Nutrition, 2000, 83:207-217.

2. Fasano A. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Feb;42(1):71-8.

3. Fasano A. Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75

4. Mirza N, Bonilla E, Phillips PE. Celiac disease in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report and review of literature. Clin Rheumatol. 2007 May;26(5):827-8

5. Freeman HJ. Adult celiac disease followed by onset of systemic lupus erythematosus. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008 Mar;42(3):252-5

6. Hrycek A, Siekiera U. Coeliac disease in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report.
Rheumatol Int. 2008 Mar;28(5):491-3.

7. Zitouni M, Daoud W, Kallel M, Makni S. Systemic lupus erythematosus with celiac disease: a report of five cases. Joint Bone Spine. 2004 Jul;71(4):344-6

8. Frassetto LA, Schloetter M, Mietus-Synder M, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A: Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. Eur J Clin Nutr 2009.

9. Jönsson T, Granfeldt Y, Ahrén B, Branell UC, Pålsson G, Hansson A, Söderström M, Lindeberg S. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study. Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:35

10. Jonsson T, Ahren B, Pacini G, Sundler F, Wierup N, Steen S, Sjoberg T, Ugander M, Frostegard J, Goransson Lindeberg S: A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pigs. Nutr Metab (Lond) 2006, 3:39.

11. Jonsson T, Granfeldt Y, Erlanson-Albertsson C, Ahren B, Lindeberg S. A Paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010 Nov 30;7(1):85

12. Lindeberg S, Jonsson T, Granfeldt Y, Borgstrand E, Soffman J, Sjostrom K, Ahren B: A Palaeolithic diet improves glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischaemic heart disease. Diabetologia 2007, 50(9):1795-1807.

13. O’Dea K: Marked improvement in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in diabetic Australian aborigines after temporary reversion to traditional lifestyle. Diabetes 1984, 33(6):596-603.

14. Osterdahl M, Kocturk T, Koochek A, Wandell PE: Effects of a short-term intervention with a paleolithic diet in healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr 2008, 62(5):682-685.

15. Ryberg M, Sandberg S, Mellberg C, Stegle O, Lindahl B, Larsson C, Hauksson J, Olsson T. A Palaeolithic-type diet causes strong tissue-specific effects on ectopic fat deposition in obese postmenopausal women. J Intern Med. 2013 Jul;274(1):67-76.

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis | The Paleo Diet

Hello Paleo Diet Team,

I’d like any information you might have on how The Paleo Diet has helped with thyroid issues. I have Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Disease and am having trouble getting consistent thyroid levels with medication. Thank you for your help.

Candice

Trevor Connor’s Response:

Hi Candice,

First a quick clarification on Hyper/hypothyroidism vs Hashimoto’s for our readers. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is the autoimmune condition where the immune system attacks the thyroid gland. We measure TgAB and thyroglobulin to track the progess of the disease. As Hashimoto’s progresses, the thyroid stops functioning properly and the patient experiences hyper- or hypothyroidism. They are tracked by looking at the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) levels. However, a patient can have hyper- or hypothyroidism without any autoimmune processes.

With that being said, we had 18 Hashimoto’s subjects of which eight provided medical records. Eight of our 18 subjects saw clear signs of improvement following The Paleo Diet and four were able to reduce medication. One of the subjects provided medical records with TgAB and Thyroglobulin levels over three years. His levels improved after going on The Paleo Diet and was eventually able to stop taking medication.

The primary process we are looking at is an imbalance between T-help cells (Th17) and Treg cells in autoimmune conditions. I’ve read a lot of research showing a clear imbalance towards Th17 in people with Hashimoto’s and a fair amount of research has shown that a wheat-based diet can promote a Th17 imbalance.

Purge the wheat from your diet, and check out Dr. Cordain’s Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (Hypothyroidism) to learn more about the healthful benefits of adopting The Paleo Diet to treat Hashimoto’s Disease.

Regards,

Trevor Connor

The Paleo Diet Team

Trevor Connor | The Paleo DietTrevor Connor is Dr. Cordain’s last mentored graduate student and will complete his M.S. in HES and Nutrition from the Colorado State University this year and later enter the Ph.D. program. Connor was the Principle Investigator in a large case study, approximately 100 subjects, in which he and Dr. Cordain examined autoimmune patients following The Paleo Diet or Paleo-like diets.

Leaky Gut Syndrome | The Paleo Diet

Dr. Cordain,

I have just finished watching your appearance on Dr. Oz yesterday, and am interested in following up on your comment regarding the need for study groups looking into “Leaky Gut Syndrome.” I have recently been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s autoimmune disorder, after many years of undiagnosed symptoms, much testing, and many life style changing debilitating symptoms. I am currently under the care of a very knowledgeable, thorough nurse practitioner who specializes in functional and integrative medicine. Throughout all of the many doctors I have seen, she is the first to ever talk about “Leaky Gut” and the multitude of symptoms it can cause.

If you know anything about study groups being formed, or have any pieces of advice you would be willing to share with me, I would love to hear!

Thank you for your research and information!

— Martha

Dr. Cordain’s Response:

Hi Martha,

Many thanks for your kind words about my research.  We have completed a large (~100) case survey of autoimmune patients including a substantial group with Hashimoto’s and other thyroid.  We examined medical records of the patients pre-post adoption of a Paleo Diet, and were encouraged by the results, particularly in autoimmune thyroid patients and those with Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis.

We believe that increased intestinal permeability (“a leaky gut”) may represent an environmental trigger for many autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals.  I have written about the mechanisms involved in the scientific literature (these papers are available as free PDF downloads at my website).  In my latest book, The Paleo Answer, I have devoted a number of chapters explaining how various foods compromise intestinal function and promote a leaky gut. The Paleo Diet severely reduces or eliminates these foods (grains, dairy, legumes, potatoes) and describes how patients with autoimmune disease should proceed cautiously with other foods known to cause a leaky gut such as capsaicin (hot) chili peppers, some nightshades, alcohol, antacids, alfalfa sprouts and a few others I describe in my book.

I hope you achieve success with The Paleo Diet.

Cordially,

Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

Are Sprouted Legumes Paleo | The Paleo Diet

Hi Dr. Cordain, the Paleo Diet makes a lot of sense to me and I very much appreciate the research that’s gone into it. However, am I right in thinking that any diet we are adapted to may nevertheless not be an ideal diet? We adapted to a diet that enabled us to be healthy enough to live long enough to reproduce healthy enough offspring.

If I understand correctly, couldn’t certain foods could make that basic diet even healthier? For example, I have The Paleo Diet for Atheletes out from the library right now and I see that you believe that the life of an athlete requires departure from a strict paleolithic diet. Couldn’t properly treated grains and legumes be beneficial additions to the diet? (i.e. soaked or sprouted to reduce/eliminate anti-nutrients?)

I am waiting to receive The Paleo Diet from the library (I’m on a long waiting list, which is good news I guess!) so maybe you address this issue in the book, in which case, I apologize. But if not, I would appreciate knowing your views on soaking/sprouting grains and legumes, and the reasons behind those views.

Thanks so much,
Zena

Maelán Fontes’ Response:

Dear Zena, first of all – thanks for supporting our work.

Lectins, one of the known antinutrients in cereal grains and legumes1, have been demonstrated to exert several deleterious effects upon human physiology1, (especially for those with autoimmune diseases) by increasing intestinal permeability2. Their function is to protect the plant against attacks by plant-eating animals by using several toxic substances, such as lectins3. There is a growing body of evidence showing that both the root and the sprout of wheat kernels have significant amounts of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), one of the most studied lectins. Indeed, WGA originates in the wheat kernel, especially during germination and growth4, and the highest concentrations are found in young plant roots, seeds, and sprouts.

Lectins are resistant to digestive enzymes, and are found intact in peripheral circulation, as shown by Wang et al (1998)5. Furthermore, they are deposited in the internal organs6.

As stated by Pusztai et al7, lectins are heat stable, and normal cooking does not completely eliminate these toxic compounds unless they are pressure cooked8-11. The best way to reduce lectins’ adverse health effects is to limit their intake.

In addition, saponins – another type of toxic/antinutritive compound – exist in legume sprouts. Saponins have been shown to affect the gut barrier and by extension immune system function12. They may also increase the risk of autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible individuals13. Soaking, sprouting or cooking legumes, does not reduce their saponin content14, 15.

In addition, a peptide fraction from gluten proteins called gliadin is found in wheat. Gliadin is resistant to digestive enzyme degradation16, arrives intact when it comes into contact with intestinal epithelial cells17, and increases intestinal permeability. Increased intestinal permeability may be at the root of autoimmune diseases such as Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes13.

Phytate, the main form of phosphorus storage in many plants (especially bran and seeds) is classified as an antinutrient because is a chelator of iron, magnesium, calcium and zinc1. Phytate ingestion inhibits the intestinal absorption of those minerals. Phosphorus from phytate is unavailable to humans, as we do not produce the phytase enzyme necessary to break down phytate – unlike ruminants, who do produce phytase, and are able to digest phytate18. Yeast fermentation in bread reduces phytate content19. Furthermore, addition of ascorbic acid counteracts the inhibitory effects of phytate upon iron absorption20. Soaking and fermentation reduces the phytate content of grains and legumes as indicated in several studies21, 22, 23, 24.

Having said that, Dr. Cordain in his first book talks about the 85:15 rule, where he explains that 85% of caloric intake from modern paleolithic-like foods is still more healthy than the typical western diet, where more than 70% of caloric intake comes from foods introduced in the human food chain after the agricultural revolution25.

The bottom line is that our metabolism is perfectly adapted to the nutrition that shaped our genome during million of years of evolution. Therefore, any nutrient introduced after the agricultural revolution may not be compatible with our ancient genome. We believe that anyone engaged in athletic activities could do very well on a diet based on 85% paleolithic nutrients, which are preferable to the nutrients found in the typical western diet.

I hope this is helpful.
Maelán Fontes, MS, Ph.D. candidate in Medical Sciences at Lund University, Sweden; International College of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine

References:

    1. Cordain L. Cereal Grains: Humanity’s Double-Edged Sword. World Rev Nutr Diet. Basel, Karger,
      1999, vol 84, pp 19–73.
    2. Cordain L. et al. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. British
      Journal of Nutrition (2000), 83, 207–217.
    3. Chrispeels, M.J. & Raikel, N.V. (1991) Lectins, lectin genes, and their role in plant defense. Plant Cell 3, 1-9.
    4. Miller, R., & Bowles, D. (1982). A comparative study of the localization of wheat-germ agglutinin
      and its potential receptors in wheat grains. Biochem. J., 206, 571-576.
    5. Wang Q, Yu LG, Campbell BJ, Milton JD, Rhodes, JM. Identification of intact peanut lectin in peripheral
      venous blood. Lancet 1998;352:1831-32.
    6. Caron, M. & Steve, A.P. (2000) Lectins and Pathology, Taylor & Francis, London.
    7. Pusztai A and Grant G. Assessment of lectin inactivation by heat and digestion. From Methods
      in Molecular Medicine. Vol 9 Lectin methods and protocols. Edited by J M Rhodes and J D Milton Humana
      Press Inc. Totowa, NJ.
    8. Grant G, More LJ, McKenzie NH, Pusztai A. The effect of heating on the haemagglutinating activity
      and nutritional properties of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds. J Sci Food Agric 1982;33: 1324-1326.
    9. Boufassa C, Lafont J, Rouanet J M, Besancon P 1986 Thermal inactivation of lectins (PHA)isolated
      from Phaseolus vulgaris. Food Chem 20 295-304.
    10. Buera M P, Pilosof A M R, Bartholomai G B 1984 Kinetics of trypsin inhibitory activity loss in
      heated flour from bean Phaseolus vulgaris. J Food Sci 49 124-126.
    11. Collins J L, Beaty B F 1980 Heat inactivation of trypsin inhibitor in fresh green soybeans and
      physiological responses of rats fed the beans. J Food Sci 45 542-546.
    12. Patel B, Rober S, Sporns P, et al. potato glycoalkaloid adversely affect intestinal permeability
      and aggravate inflammatory bowel disease.
    13. Visser J, Rozing J, Sapone A et al. Tight junctions, Intestinal permeability and Autoimmunity.
      Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1165: 195-205 (2009).
    14. Ruiz RG, Price K, Rose M, Rhodes M, Fenwick R. A preliminary study on the effect of germination
      on saponin content and composition of lentils and chickpeas. Z Lebensm Unters Forsch 1996;203:366-369.
    15. Ruiz RG, Price KR, Arthur AE, Rose ME, Rhodes MJ, Fenwick RG. Effect of soaking and cooking on
      the saponin content and composition of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) and lentils (Lens culinaris).
      J Agric Food Chem 1996;44:1526-1530.
    16. Shan L, Qiao SW, Arentz-Hansen H, et al. Identification and Analysis of Multivalent Proteolytically
      Resistant Peptides from Gluten: Implications for Celiac Sprue. J Proteome Res. 2005 ; 4(5): 1732–1741.
    17. Drago S, Asmar R, Di Pierro M, et al. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac
      intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology,
      2006; 41:408/419.
    18. Klopfenstein, TJ et al. “Animal Diet Modification to Decrease the Potential for Nitrogen and
      Phosphorus Pollution”. Council for Agricultural Science and Technology 21.
    19. Reinhold JG. Phytate destruction by yeast fermentation in whole wheat meals. J Am Diet Assoc 1975;66:38-41.
    20. Hallberg L, Brune M, Rossander L. Iron absorption in man: ascorbic acid and dose-dependent inhibition
      by phytate. Am J Clin Nutr 1989;49:140-4.
    21. Chen LH, Pan SH. Decrease of phytates during germination of pea seeds (Pisium Sativa). Nutr Rept Int.
      1977;16: 125-131.
    22. Walker KA. Changes in phytic acid and phytase during early development of phaseoleus vulgaris beans.
      Planta 1974;116:91-98
    23. Bain, J. M., Murcer, F. V.: Changes in phytic acid and acid-soluble phosphorus in maturing pinto beans.
      J. Sci. Fd. Agric. 20, 82–84 (1966).
    24. Jennings, A. C., Morton, R. K.: Changes in nucleic acids and other phosphorus-containing compounds of
      developing wheat grain. Aust. J. Biol Sci. 16, 332–341 (1963b).
    25. Cordain L, Eaton SB, Sebastian A, et al. Origins and evolution of the western diet: health implications
      for the 21st century. Am J Clin Nutr 2005;81:341–54.

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis and The Paleo Diet | The Paleo Diet

Hello,

The article, “Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis” is of interest to me, but is 10 years old. Can you suggest any more recent scientifically valid articles on the same topic?

Many thanks,

Allena

Maelán Fontes’ Response:

Hi Allena,

To my knowledge, there are no reviews or studies addressing the role of a paleolithic diet and it’s implications in rheumatoid arthritis, except from that of Dr. Cordain. In his MS (Multiple Sclerosis) DVD Dr. Cordain thoroughly explains the dietary mechanisms of autoimmunity in MS, which are almost the same for all autoimmune diseases–including RA. Those are: increased intestinal permeability, increased passage of luminal antigens into peripheral circulation, molecular mimicry and genetic susceptibility (genes encoding for the HLA system), among other factors.

In recent years, new substances have been discovered which might be responsible for increased intestinal permeability, namely saponins (found in legumes), potatoes, soya, quinoa, amaranth, alfalfa sprouts or tomatoes. If you’ve seen Dr. Cordain’s scientific paper entitled “Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis”, I am sure you are aware of the role lectins play in autoimmunity.

Adjuvants are used by immunologists in order to boost the immune system and induce immunization. It turns out that certain foods have bioactive compounds that have adjuvant-like activity, this is the case for tomatoes or quillaja (a foaming agent used in beers and soft drinks).

Gliadin is a prolamine found in wheat which has been shown to increase intestinal permeability and hence the risk of suffering an autoimmune disease.

On the other hand, several clinical trials have been conducted with promising results. However, they have used a gluten-free diet or vegan diet instead of a whole paleolithic diet, which we think is the superior diet.

In vegan diets, authors often claim that the effects might be due to the lack of meat, but we think the positive effect relies on the lack of diary proteins and gluten. Meat has historically been seen as the “bad guy” in inflammation, but the data to support that notion is not sufficient to support this view.

Below are some references that could be useful.

Gluten-free vegan diet induces decreased LDL and oxidized LDL levels and raised atheroprotective natural antibodies against phosphorylcholine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized study. Elkan AC, Sjöberg B, Kolsrud B, Ringertz B, Hafström I, Frostegård J. Arthritis Res Ther. 2008;10(2):R34. Epub 2008 Mar 18.

A vegan diet free of gluten improves the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis: the effects on arthritis correlate with a reduction in antibodies to food antigens. Hafström I, Ringertz B, Spångberg A, von Zweigbergk L, Brannemark S, Nylander I, Rönnelid J, Laasonen L, Klareskog L. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2001 Oct;40(10):1175-9.

I hope this helps.
Maelán Fontes MS Ph.D. candidate in Medical Sciences at Lund University, Sweden

Non-Dairy Protein Shakes | The Paleo Diet

I like drinking protein shakes in the morning, but I noticed some of the protein sources in my protein is made from milk or dairy products. Is there any non-dairy protein shakes available in the market place?

Thanks,
John-Michael

Maelán Fontes’ Response:

Dear John-Michael,

Yes, egg white protein powder is a better option than whey protein. Whey is a good source of casein and IGF-1, two insulinogenic (they increase pancreas insulin release) peptides that may lead to hyperinsulinemia which is at the root of many chronic degenerative diseases as shown in Dr. Cordain’s scientific paper: “Hyperinsulinemic diseases: more than just syndrome X”

However, if you suffer from an autoimmune disease you may want to reduce egg whites until your symptoms improve. Lean meats and fish are good sources of proteins and particularly of branched chain amino acids which increase muscle growth.

I hope this helps.

Maelán Fontes, MS, Ph.D., Candidate in Medical Sciences at Lund University, Sweden; International College of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine

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