noun_Search_345985 Created with Sketch.
noun_Search_345985 Created with Sketch.

The latest from The Paleo Diet®, just for you.

Hot topics, new recipes, and science

A Question About Occasional Fasting

By Maelán Fontes
February 9, 2010
https://thepaleodiet.imgix.net/images/fasting.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&fit=clip&position=17.38%2048.8&q=95&w=900

Hello,

You may have covered this issue already, I have not read that much of your work.

I thought I would point out though that Paleo humans likely went through periods of enforced occasional fasting due to a lack of game or a temporary lack of success in hunting. In fact, there were likely alternating cycles of gorging and fasting. This alternating cycle would change the data on the Paleo diet as modern humans are not likely to be undergoing the fasting phase.

It seems like doing a study using the climate record might help as Paleo man may not have migrated as much as the animals that they hunted.

Have you already covered this?

Just another nutrition student,

Bob

Maelán Fontes' Response:

Dear Bob,

We agree in that hunter-gatherers would probably have been forced to observe periods of intermittent fasting.

In our archive you can find a published issue of our newsletter (Vol. 1; Issue 3) where Dr. Cordain reports that hunter-gatherers usually ate a single meal in the evening and probably breakfast using leftovers from the night before. This makes sense as they spent the day engaged in foraging and hunting activities and returned to their camps in the sunset. Some of the beneficial effects of intermittent fasting are likely due to caloric restriction, a well as known interventions that increase health in animals and humans, and lifespan in animals such as hamsters, mice, rats, fish, insects and worms.

A feast-famine, exercise-rest cycle has been postulated as a healthful lifestyle similar to that of human beings in the paleolithic. Famine and exercise (simultaneously) decrease muscle glycogen and triglycerides stores increasing AMPK and GLUT4 expression. These two proteins are involved in glucose and triglycerides homeostasis, leading to an efficient storage of energy and increased physical performance. If hunting is successful, a replenishment of glycogen and triglycerides is produced. This is followed by a relative period of rest. This efficient storage of energy increases the probabilities of surviving during another famine/exercise period.1

This should be a healthy way to improve health and physical performance from an evolutionary perspective.

1. Chakravarthy, M. V., Booth, F. W. Eating, exercise, and "thrifty" genotypes: connecting the dots toward an evolutionary understanding of modern chronic diseases. J Appl Physiol, 96 (1); 3-10.

I hope this helps.

Cordially,
Maelán Fontes MS Ph.D. candidate in Medical Sciences at Lund University, Sweden

Even More Articles For You

Easy With That Salt Shaker: The Effect of Dietary Salt On Sleep
Dietary salt leads to increased cortisol levels, and these excess levels affect sleep. Find out how ditching that salt shaker can help you catch some Zs.
By O. H. Okoye
Recipe: Dill Curry Roasted Cauliflower
Cauliflower is rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and fiber. It is also high in glucosinolates, which have been shown to inhibit growth of cancer cells.
By Christopher Clark
Beans and Legumes: Are they Paleo?
I was delighted to learn Dr. Oz was going to again feature The Paleo Diet, except expounding upon the health virtues of beans and legumes is unacceptable.
By Loren Cordain, Ph.D.
Paleo Leadership
 
Trevor Connor
Trevor Connor

Dr. Loren Cordain’s final graduate student, Trevor Connor, M.S., brings more than a decade of nutrition and physiology expertise to spearhead the new Paleo Diet team.

Mark J Smith
Dr. Mark Smith

One of the original members of the Paleo movement, Mark J. Smith, Ph.D., has spent nearly 30 years advocating for the benefits of Paleo nutrition.

Nell Stephenson
Nell Stephenson

Ironman athlete, mom, author, and nutrition blogger Nell Stephenson has been an influential member of the Paleo movement for over a decade.

Loren Cordain
Dr. Loren Cordain

As a professor at Colorado State University, Dr. Loren Cordain developed The Paleo Diet® through decades of research and collaboration with fellow scientists around the world.