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Omega 3 eggs as a part of The Paleo Diet®

By The Paleo Diet Team
January 7, 2012
Omega 3 eggs as a part of The Paleo Diet® image

The excerpt below is from www.paleoista.com

You may have noticed a mention of Omega 3 eggs from time to time on my site, blog or recipes.

Wait just one minute.

How can I be suggesting this if the way that chicken eggs become classed as ‘Omega 3 eggs’ is via a diet high in flax seed, something they’re not meant to be eating, and lacking in what they are meant to be eating (by the way, doesn’t this sound familiar, as in the way most Americans eat- things they’re not supposed to and nothing they are supposed to?) including small critters like bugs?

Aside from warranting literally hungry chickens, the resulting egg is not going to be what it is supposed to be, and the color of the yolk is clear evidence of that.

But that’s only if you eat Omega 3 eggs from that type of source.

How about Omega 3 eggs from hens that have been allowed to forage in a wild environment and eat the diet they’re supposed to eat?

I double checked with my number one go-to resource, Dr. Cordain, and he confirmed:

“Chickens that are allowed to forage in an unrestricted environment in which they eat eat insects, bugs, worms, invertebrates, small amphibians along with wild plant foods produce egg yolks that are dark yellow bordering on red. The egg shells are thicker and much more difficult to crack than supermarket eggs (either omega 3 enriched or not.). Further eggs from real, free-ranging chickens taste better, and although few scientific studies have examined these differences, I suspect that free ranging chicken eggs are nutritionally superior to either hen house eggs or even omega 3 enriched eggs from hen-house chickens. Omega 3 enriched eggs that you can buy at the supermarket are better than the generic, cheap hen house raised versions, but still are inferior to eggs laid by chickens allowed to forage in a wild environment.”

He also referred me to a very useful website: http://eatwild.com.

Eat your eggs! Not comfortable with raw? A six-minute, soft-boiled egg is a happy medium between raw, with higher nutrients but also possible higher bacteria levels, and scrambled and cooked to death.

I love a runny egg cracked over a plate of any greens- so delicious and nutritious!

Nell Stephenson
@nellstephenson
Paleoista
www.Paleoista.com

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