The Rice Diet Misses the 21st Century Mark

Rice Diet

The Rice Diet, one of the most renowned diet centers in the country has closed it doors after 70 years of operation. The Rice Diet promotes low-calorie, low-salt, high-carb consumption, specifically that of white rice and fruit. As Paleo dieters, you know full well that a low calorie via high carb is a poor strategy because it dramatically increases the glycemic load and leaves you starved.

A recent large randomized controlled trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that the most effective way to lose weight and keep it off was with a high protein, low glycemic load diet. While diet programs enter the mainstream regularly, their widespread adoption by the population depends on the scientific community that touts the diet is sound from a scientific and medical point of view. The tenets of the Rice Diet are simply inconsistent with the thousands of direct and indirect experimental studies that point to the best scientifically sound diets of the 21st century.

The Paleo Diet on the other hand is a high protein, low glycemic load diet. It promotes weight loss, improves overall health and has shown  to cure disease. The glycemic index gauges how much particular foods raise our blood glucose concentrations. High protein are the most effective to improve blood chemistry, meanwhile real foods such as grass produced or free ranging meats, fish, eggs, fresh fruits and veggies typically have moderate to low glycemic indicies. Foods like rice, white bread, and cereal grains have high glycemic indices, causing rapid and marked increases in our blood glucose levels. These foods tend to promote diseases of insulin resistance such as Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension, Cardiovascular Disease, obesity, gout and detrimental blood chemistry profiles. Knowing this, the Rice Diet Program just doesn’t make the cut.

Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus

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  1. Pingback: Is Rice Paleo? - Sure Paleo

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