Tag Archives: raspberries

Ultimate Antioxidant Paleo Breakfast Bowl

August 3 – 9 marks the USDA’s 15th Annual National Farmers Market Week. With over 7,800 farmers markets, (up 67% since 2008!1), shopping and supporting local is not only encouraged, but also nutritious. Expect to find ultra-fresh vegetables, unique heirloom varieties, and farmers committed to quality, organic foods.

While we support organic agriculture, we acknowledge its limitations and complications. A 2012 Stanford study concluded organic foods are not significantly more nutritious than conventional foods, but may contain fewer pesticides.2 Some organic producers use natural pesticides, but their use isn’t necessarily “healthier.”3, 4 Surely there are healthful benefits to consuming organic, right? A recent study published in the British Medical Journal concluded organic foods are significantly higher in antioxidants and lower in pesticide residues.5

At farmers markets, you can speak directly with farmers and understand their philosophies regarding pesticides. Sometimes you’ll meet farmers committed to minimizing pesticides, natural or otherwise, and others whose products aren’t necessarily USDA Certified Organic, but nevertheless are high quality.

The following recipe features many antioxidant powerhouses, including cloves, the number one dietary source of polyphenols (the most common type of antioxidant).6 Yes, you can eat cloves! Soften them and they’re delicious. Berries, plums, almonds, mint (especially peppermint), and cacao are also exceptionally potent sources of antioxidants.7

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 handful of blueberries
  • 1 handful of raspberries
  • 2 or 3 small plums
  • ¾ cup almonds, soaked overnight
  • 15 to 20 cloves
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 20 mint leaves
  • 1 – 2 tbsp raw cacao (100% cacao, unsweetened)

DIRECTIONS

clark-breakfast-bowl4
Ingredients
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

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references

1. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=KYF_MISSION

2. Smith-Spangler, C., et al. (September 4, 2012). Are organic foods safer or healthier than conventional alternatives? A Systematic Review. Annals of Internal Medicine, 157(3). Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22944875

3. Wilcox, Christie. (July 18, 2011). Mythbusting 101: Organic Farming > Conventional Agriculture. Scientific American. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/07/18/mythbusting-101-organic-farming-conventional-agriculture/

4. Wilcox, Christie. (August 15, 2011). In the immortal words of Tom Petty: “I won’t back down.” Scientific American. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/08/15/organic_myths_revisited/

5. Baranski, M., et al. (July, 2014). Higher antioxidant and lower cadmium concentrations and lower incidence of pesticide residues in organically grown crops: a systematic literature review and meta-analyses. British Medical Journal, 26(1-18). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24968103

6. Pérez-Jiménez, J., Neveu, V., Vos, F., and Scalbert, A. (November 2010). Identification of the 100 richest dietary sources of polyphenols: an application of the Phenol-Explorer database. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(Suppl. 3). Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n3s/fig_tab/ejcn2010221t1.html#figure-title

7. Ibid.

4 Anti-inflammatory Farmers Market Finds

National Farmer’s Market week celebrates two distinct and important aspects of this way of eating: locally-sourced foods and seasonally appropriate. And to that end, here are a few great, nutrient-dense seasonal foods you may find at your local market to include in your Paleo menu. Many of them provide not only a great variety of flavors, but also anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and otherwise health-promoting compounds. 2, 6

Broccoli

Broccoli is rich in vitamin C and fibre, and is surprisingly high in protein. It is a source of some potent phytochemicals, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which have demonstrated protective effects in models of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and other conditions.1, 5, 11 Sautéed with a little garlic (another nutritional powerhouse) in olive oil, and you’ve got a delicious side dish for any Paleo meal.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a good source of antioxidants, retinoids (vitamin A-like compounds), and lycopene. The latter has been shown to protect the skin from the damaging effects of excess ultraviolet radiation – which might come in handy in the summer months, coincidentally, when tomatoes are in season.4, 7, 10 Cooking tomatoes maximizes the lycopene content,3 perfect for a summer Paleo Gazpacho.

If you have an autoimmune disease, certain glycoalkaloids in tomatoes may act to increase intestinal permeability and also contain certain immunological adjuvants (alpha tomatine in tomatoes) that up-regulate the immune response and should be avoided.

Zucchini

Zucchini is rich in folate, copper, and potassium, and is an extremely low-calorie food; only about 10-15 calories in a whole zucchini. It’s also one of the best sources for lutein and zeaxanthin, two phytonutrients that are good for ocular health.9 Zucchini has a delicate flavor which has been described as savory by some, and can be sliced, grilled, and ready-to-eat in just a few minutes.

Raspberries

Raspberries are another great source of antioxidants and anthocyanins. One study showed the equivalent of about a handful of raspberries per day reduces markers of inflammation in the blood while another study showed potentially protective effects against colorectal cancer. 8

While this is a terribly abbreviated list, you’ll surely find many other great Paleo Diet approved options at your local Farmer’s Market, so by all means, enjoy!

William Lagakos, Ph.D.
@caloriesproper
CaloriesProper

William Lagakos, Ph.D.Dr. William Lagakos received a Ph.D. in Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology from Rutgers University where his research focused on dietary fat assimilation and integrated energy metabolism. His postdoctoral research at the University of California, San Diego, centered on obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Dr. William Lagakos has authored numerous manuscripts which have been published in peer-reviewed journals, as well as a non-fiction book titled The Poor, Misunderstood Calorie which explores the concept of calories and simultaneously explains how hormones and the neuroendocrine response to foods regulate nutrient partitioning. He is presently a nutritional sciences researcher, consultant, and blogger.

References

1. Jayakumar P, Pugalendi KV, Sankaran M. Attenuation of hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress by indole-3-carbinol and its metabolite 3, 3′- diindolylmethane in C57BL/6J mice. J Physiol Biochem. Jun 2014;70(2):525-534.

2. Jiang Y, Wu SH, Shu XO, Xiang YB, Ji BT, Milne GL, . . . Yang G. Cruciferous vegetable intake is inversely correlated with circulating levels of proinflammatory markers in women. J Acad Nutr Diet. May 2014;114(5):700-708 e702.

3. Kamiloglu S, Demirci M, Selen S, Toydemir G, Boyacioglu D, Capanoglu E. Home processing of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum): effects on in vitro bioaccessibility of total lycopene, phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidant capacity. J Sci Food Agric. Aug 2014;94(11):2225-2233.

4. Khachik F, Carvalho L, Bernstein PS, Muir GJ, Zhao DY, Katz NB. Chemistry, distribution, and metabolism of tomato carotenoids and their impact on human health. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). Nov 2002;227(10):845-851.

5. Lenzi M, Fimognari C, Hrelia P. Sulforaphane as a promising molecule for fighting cancer. Cancer Treat Res. 2014;159:207-223.

6. Macready AL, George TW, Chong MF, Alimbetov DS, Jin Y, Vidal A, . . . Group FS. Flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetables improve microvascular reactivity and inflammatory status in men at risk of cardiovascular disease–FLAVURS: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. Mar 2014;99(3):479-489.

7. Rizwan M, Rodriguez-Blanco I, Harbottle A, Birch-Machin MA, Watson RE, Rhodes LE. Tomato paste rich in lycopene protects against cutaneous photodamage in humans in vivo: a randomized controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. Jan 2011;164(1):154-162.

8. Sardo CL, Kitzmiller JP, Apseloff G, Harris RB, Roe DJD, Stoner GD, Jacobs ET. An Open-Label Randomized Crossover Trial of Lyophilized Black Raspberries on Postprandial Inflammation in Older Overweight Males: A Pilot Study. Am J Ther. Aug 26 2013.

9. Sommerburg O, Keunen JE, Bird AC, van Kuijk FJ. Fruits and vegetables that are sources for lutein and zeaxanthin: the macular pigment in human eyes. Br J Ophthalmol. Aug 1998;82(8):907-910.

10. Stahl W, Heinrich U, Aust O, Tronnier H, Sies H. Lycopene-rich products and dietary photoprotection. Photochem Photobiol Sci. Feb 2006;5(2):238-242.

11. Tarozzi A, Angeloni C, Malaguti M, Morroni F, Hrelia S, Hrelia P. Sulforaphane as a potential protective phytochemical against neurodegenerative diseases. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2013;2013:415078.

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