Tag Archives: paleo recipes

The Paleo Diet | Christmas Nuts

When it comes to the holidays, it can be much more difficult to stick to your Paleo Diet. But – fortunately – there are many ways to “Paleo-fy” your favorite holiday meals. Today, I will be covering how you can transform a traditional Christmas dinner – into a much healthier one. Forget the empty calories of stuffing, rolls and pumpkin pie. Instead, say hello to some delicious sweet potatoes, free-range organic turkey and a large helping of brain-friendly vegetables! While your loved ones may be passed out on the couch after dinner, you will be energized, alert – and maybe even ready to run a 5K. So without further ado, here is my guide on how to have the best Paleo Christmas dinner.

Forget the Rolls, Bread, Mashed Potatoes and Stuffing

As I have covered many times on The Paleo Diet, gluten and pseudograins are not ideal for your body (or brain).1,2,3 And as Dr. Cordain has written, white potatoes are not the healthiest choice for you, either.4 The first difference between a healthy, Paleo Christmas dinner and the more gluttonous traditional version? Sweeping away all the extra, empty calories! As tough as it may be, say goodbye to the huge doses of stuffing, bread, mashed potatoes and rolls. But just because you might be skipping these – does not mean you necessarily have to forget about all forms of carbohydrates.

Replace Them with Sweet Potatoes and Mashed Cauliflower

Sweet potatoes are much different than the traditional white potato, and make a great substitute for holiday meals. And if you are missing the mashed potatoes – try mashing up some cauliflower instead.5 Once you add some grass-fed butter, herbs, spices and perhaps even some other vegetables, to this mashed mix, you will hardly notice the difference! Not only are you avoiding the numerous problems with white potatoes – you are getting a much bigger dose of nutrients than you normally would, at a traditional holiday meal.6,7,8,9,10,11

Keep the Turkey, But Make Sure It Is Properly Sourced

The best news about a Paleo holiday dinner? You can still indulge in the turkey! That’s right, keep the bird on the table. However, it is important to make sure you get a free-range, organic turkey. Though the cost may be slightly more, the benefits of properly sourced meat are definitely worth it.12,13,14,15 For example, an organic, free-range turkey has absolutely zero of the hormones or antibiotics, which are usually found in most meat.

The most commonly asked question I get about buying this premium type of bird is ‘do I really need to spend this much more on a turkey?’. While there is little doubt that a high quality turkey may cost more upfront – most people have no problem paying the extra cost, once they realize exactly what they are avoiding.16,17,18,19

For example, a regular turkey is usually fed a diet which consists mostly of grain and corn. This means they are usually also consuming very large amounts of pesticides – as well as GMOs. These unhealthy elements can end up making their way into your body, as a result. 99% of the time, grain-fed meat is also lower in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) – as well as being much, much higher in omega-6.20,21 As I have covered previously, this is far from ideal.22

Make It More Colorful, By Adding Vegetables and Fruits

The traditional Christmas dinner has the same old, regular line-up of vegetables – but it doesn’t necessarily have to be this way. Try making a super-nutritious salad, filled with cancer-preventing kale, spinach and broccoli.23,24,25,26 Or try some other nutritious sides, like yucca root, butternut squash soup or a Swiss chard salad. Let your imagination run wild here, and avoid the excess sugar and carb loads, which plague nearly every holiday meal.

Increase the Fat Content

Traditional holiday meals are also plagued with very low amounts of heart (and brain) healthy fats. Try making your big meal more Paleo, by adding in some generous amounts of extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil and avocados. Numerous scientific studies tout the myriad of health benefits shown, when consuming these fats.27,28,29,30,31,32 Dig in!

What about Dessert?

While it is very tempting to indulge in pumpkin pie or some other form of sweets after the big meal, it does not make sense, if you truly wish to stay healthy. I have written on the ills of sugar numerous times, and it is a much better idea to skip dessert, altogether.33,34 Plan a healthy activity for after dinner, like a short hike or run, that way you have something to look forward to. If you absolutely must indulge, pick a very high quality, organic dark chocolate. And keep your portion small!

Keep It Fun!

Ultimately, holiday meals are about being together with your loved ones. While consuming lots of carbohydrates can produce serotonin (a neurotransmitter closely related to your mood) – this is artificial.35,36,37,38 Find gratitude and happiness in your own life, and keep your holidays fun – not stressful! Remember to avoid caffeine as well (especially in excess), as it can make you more anxious and tense – which is the last thing you want during the stress-filled holidays.39,40

As you can see, you may have to give up some of your favorite holiday foods, but the health benefits of leaving these foods out, are definitely much better in the long run. In closing, I hope this guide has provided you with a plethora of good ideas, about having a much healthier Paleo meal, this holiday season. I wish you, and your loved ones, the best!


[1]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/gluten-brain/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[2]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/celiac-disease-gluten-children/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[3]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/stop-settling-for-pseudo-health-and-say-no-to-pseudograins/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[4]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/are-potatoes-paleo/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[5]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/sweet-potatoes-paleo/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[6]Cordain L, Eaton SB, Sebastian A, et al. Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(2):341-54.

[7]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/dr-cordains-rebuttal-to-us-news-and-world-report/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[8]Frassetto LA, Schloetter M, Mietus-Synder M, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A: Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. Eur J Clin Nutr 2009.

[9]Jönsson T, Granfeldt Y, Ahrén B, Branell UC, Pålsson G, Hansson A, Söderström M, Lindeberg S. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study. Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:35

[10]Jonsson T, Granfeldt Y, Erlanson-Albertsson C, Ahren B, Lindeberg S. A Paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010 Nov 30;7(1):85

[11]Osterdahl M, Kocturk T, Koochek A, Wandell PE: Effects of a short-term intervention with a paleolithic diet in healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr 2008, 62(5):682-685.

[12]Forman J, Silverstein J. Organic foods: health and environmental advantages and disadvantages. Pediatrics. 2012;130(5):e1406-15.

[13]Chhabra R, Kolli S, Bauer JH. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(1):e52988.

[14]Crinnion WJ. Organic foods contain higher levels of certain nutrients, lower levels of pesticides, and may provide health benefits for the consumer. Altern Med Rev. 2010;15(1):4-12.

[15]Kamihiro S, Stergiadis S, Leifert C, Eyre MD, Butler G. Meat quality and health implications of organic and conventional beef production. Meat Sci. 2015;100:306-18.

[16]Epstein SS. The chemical jungle: today’s beef industry. Int J Health Serv. 1990;20(2):277-80.

[17]Pan A, Malik VS, Hu FB. Exporting diabetes mellitus to Asia: the impact of Western-style fast food. Circulation. 2012;126(2):163-5.

[18]Hemeda HM. Microbiological investigation and nutritional evaluation of selected fast food meat. J Egypt Public Health Assoc. 1995;70(1-2):105-26.

[19]Prayson B, Mcmahon JT, Prayson RA. Fast food hamburgers: what are we really eating?. Ann Diagn Pathol. 2008;12(6):406-9.

[20]Ponnampalam EN, Mann NJ, Sinclair AJ. Effect of feeding systems on omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and trans fatty acids in Australian beef cuts: potential impact on human health. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2006;15(1):21-9.

[21]Daley CA, Abbott A, Doyle PS, Nader GA, Larson S. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef. Nutr J. 2010;9:10.

[22]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/omega-3-vs-omega-6-rethinking-hypothesis/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[23]Van poppel G, Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA. Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;472:159-68.

[24]Maeda N, Matsubara K, Yoshida H, Mizushina Y. Anti-cancer effect of spinach glycoglycerolipids as angiogenesis inhibitors based on the selective inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. Mini Rev Med Chem. 2011;11(1):32-8.

[25]Verhoeven DT, Goldbohm RA, Van poppel G, Verhagen H, Van den brandt PA. Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996;5(9):733-48.

[26]Olsen H, Grimmer S, Aaby K, Saha S, Borge GI. Antiproliferative effects of fresh and thermal processed green and red cultivars of curly kale (Brassica oleracea L. convar. acephala var. sabellica). J Agric Food Chem. 2012;60(30):7375-83.

[27]Lawrence GD. Dietary fats and health: dietary recommendations in the context of scientific evidence. Adv Nutr. 2013;4(3):294-302.

[28]Feinman RD. Saturated fat and health: recent advances in research. Lipids. 2010;45(10):891-2.

[29]Farr SA, Price TO, Dominguez LJ, et al. Extra virgin olive oil improves learning and memory in SAMP8 mice. J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;28(1):81-92.

[30]Virruso C, Accardi G, Colonna-romano G, Candore G, Vasto S, Caruso C. Nutraceutical properties of extra-virgin olive oil: a natural remedy for age-related disease?. Rejuvenation Res. 2014;17(2):217-20.

[31]Lou-bonafonte JM, Arnal C, Navarro MA, Osada J. Efficacy of bioactive compounds from extra virgin olive oil to modulate atherosclerosis development. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012;56(7):1043-57.

[32]Visioli F, Bernardini E. Extra virgin olive oil’s polyphenols: biological activities. Curr Pharm Des. 2011;17(8):786-804.

[33]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/sugar-is-killing-us/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[34]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/neurobiology-sugar-cravings/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[35]Wurtman RJ, Wurtman JJ. Brain serotonin, carbohydrate-craving, obesity and depression. Obes Res. 1995;3 Suppl 4:477S-480S.

[36]Wurtman RJ, Wurtman JJ. Carbohydrate craving, obesity and brain serotonin. Appetite. 1986;7 Suppl:99-103.

[37]Fernstrom JD. Carbohydrate ingestion and brain serotonin synthesis: relevance to a putative control loop for regulating carbohydrate ingestion, and effects of aspartame consumption. Appetite. 1988;11 Suppl 1:35-41.

[38]Wurtman RJ, Wurtman JJ. Do carbohydrates affect food intake via neurotransmitter activity?. Appetite. 1988;11 Suppl 1:42-7.

[39]Available at: http://thepaleodiet.com/caffeine-brain-part-1/. Accessed December 14, 2015.

[40]Available at: http://greatist.com/grow/negative-health-effects-of-caffeine. Accessed December 14, 2015.


Here’s a great recipe for the holidays. It’s a perfect dish to cook all afternoon with family or friends gathered at your house while the scent of rosemary slowly spreads from room to room.

The concept is simple and straightforward. We’re just stuffing a duck with orange pieces and rosemary and adding some root vegetables to the roasting pan. The flavors from the duck mix with the orange and rosemary to flavor the meat and the vegetables.

Normally you’ll end up buying the duck frozen. So if that’s the case, make sure it’s fully defrosted before you start cooking. Ideally you would transfer it from the freezer to the refrigerator and leave it there for about 24 hours.

Duck is quite fatty and during the cooking process, this fat slowly seeps out. Juices from the duck mix with juice from the oranges and with the duck fat; this entire mixture spreads around the roasting pan. To prevent the duck and vegetables from drying out, it’s critical that you use a baster to spread these juices around.

After about the first 45 minutes in the oven, you’ll want to remove the pan about once every 20 minutes. Tilt the pan to one side so all the juices gather there. Draw them into the baster and then baste the duck and the vegetables. Do this several times. If you don’t have a baster you can tilt the juices to one side and scoop them out with a large spoon.

The duck needs to cook a good 2.5 hours normally, depending on the size. When the meat is be very tender and the skin is dark brown and the legs pull easily away from the body, it should be done.

If you want some duck fat for future recipes, simply pour the remaining juices after cooking into a small mug or bowl. Put this in the refrigerator. The fat will separate and rise to the top.

Rosemary Orange Duck with Roasted Vegetables



  • 1 duck
  • 2-3 oranges (clementines also work nicely)
  • 1 bunch of rosemary
  • 5-6 carrots
  • 5-6 parsnips
  • 3 leeks
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • Freshly milled black pepper



  1. Crush the garlic in a garlic press. Cut the carrots and parsnips into small-bite pieces. Cut the leeks into 1-inch rounds.
  2. Mix all the vegetables with the crushed garlic and spread this mixture on the bottom of a roasting pan.
  3. Cut the oranges into quarters. Stuff the orange pieces and the rosemary into the cavity of the duck.
  4. Sprinkle the duck with some crushed black pepper.
  5. Place the duck on top of the roasted vegetables.
  6. Place the pan into the oven at 375F. Bake for about 45 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and, using a baster, spread the juices over the duck and the vegetables. This helps keep them from drying out.
  7. Baste every 20 minutes or so until the duck is fully cooked. Total cooking time should be about 2.5 hours.

Serves 4

Halloween | The Paleo Diet

Boo! Halloween doesn’t disguise itself. This holiday is clearly all about candy, costumes, and community. The last two are certainly positive and Paleo lifestyle approved, allowing children to use their imaginations, while fostering connections with our neighbors, with the added benefit of everyone getting outside to walk around for a few hours.

Halloween doesn’t have to be all about candy, even if you want to indulge in some sweets for the night, there’s an opportunity to take Halloween to the next level, Paleo Diet style. Instead of being known as the house who hands out the biggest and most amazing candy bar, why not be known for throwing the best party on the block Transform your Halloween into a festive, community focused celebration by hosting a Paleo- approved party. We’ve provided the entertainment and the food to get you inspired.

Paleo Tricks

Halloween Scavenger Hunt

Scavenger hunts are versatile to be held indoors, in your yard, or around your neighborhood, and fun for all ages. Stock up on Halloween themed items like skulls, fake spiders, eyeballs, tombstones, witches hats, and brooms. Create a list for your little goblins to fill out and let them loose to discover what’s lurking!

Apple Bobbing

Arguably one of the oldest Halloween games, bobbing for apples is sure to be entertaining. Stay dry and avoid sharing germs by suspending apples from a tree by securing a string to their stem. Adjust the height and the size of the apple to match the children’s proportions, and remind everyone no hands allowed.

Pumpkin Decorating Contest

Even the youngest ghouls can enjoy decorating a pumpkin with washable paints or markers. For older children and those who are still kids at heart, let their imaginations run wild carving their Paleo treats.

Costume Contest

Create enough categories so every trick-or-treater that participates can be recognized for their costume. This contest can also be turned into a block parade so everyone can enjoy seeing the youngest to the oldest dressed up for the holiday.

Paleo Treats

Halloween eats don’t have to be limited to high fructose corn syrup and chocolate. Our favorite black and orange Paleo foods are olives, poppy seeds, raisins/currants, orange bell peppers, oranges, carrots, squash, pumpkins, and sweet potatoes. You can get inspired to use these with your own recipes or check out our Halloween menu with ghoulish Paleo eats sure to appeal to everyone, and this time we even left out the organs!

The Paleo Diet Halloween Party Menu

Spider’s Web Eggs

This Spider Web Egg recipe is sure to excite the kids at the party, as they have a spider web pattern all over them.

Shredded Ginger and Carrot Salad with Raisin Eyes

Using a cheese grater or the grating attachment of your food processor, shred 1 pound of carrots and a 1-2 inch cube of ginger. Dress the salad with a small amount of walnut oil, season with black pepper to taste, and garnish each serving with raisin eyes.

Smoky Stuffed Sweet Orange Peppers

Stuffed peppers are almost shaped like human skulls. Top with a deep, rich, homemade marinara sauce to resemble blood. Recipe for Smoky Stuffed Sweet Orange Peppers can be fund in The Real Paleo Diet Cookbook or use your favorite Paleo stuffed orange bell pepper recipe filled with seasoned ground beef and cauliflower rice.

Roasted Golden Cauliflower and Olives

Take 1 pound of golden cauliflower florets, toss with a generous amount of olive oil until well coated and season with black pepper to taste. Roast in a 400° oven in a shallow baking dish for about 20 minutes. Add ½ cup pitted black olives and roast for another 10 minutes or until cooked through. Garnish with fresh, chopped, flat leaf parsley.

Chocolate Covered Apple Chips

Easy enough for kids to make and a Paleo approved way to incorporate chocolate into your festivities! Grab the recipe in The Real Paleo Diet Cookbook.

Happy Halloween!

Paleo Recipe | The Paleo Diet

Hawaiian cuisine incorporates five distinct styles of food reflecting the diverse food history of settlement and immigration in the islands.1 Polynesian voyagers brought plants and animals to the islands, contributing to the local fish, taro (which were raised for poi), coconuts, sugarcane, sweet potatoes and yams, and meat, cooked in earth ovens.

Later, large plantations developed with the arrival of Europeans, Americans, missionaries, and whalers who introduced cuisine native to their homelands to Hawaii. In the late 1800s, migrant workers from China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines, and Portugal immigrated to meet the growing labor needs of the pineapple industry in Hawaii, bringing with them rich new foods and flavors that further influenced the region.

Can we say fusion cuisine? Try saying that five times!

When we think of a Paleo autumn recipe, most of us, myself included, don’t think tropical flavors from lands from afar. But since it is fall, and I happen to be writing to you from Kona, why not come up with a Hawaiian twist on a fall favorite?

The hardest part: deciding what type of preparation seems most fitting, captures Hawaiian tradition, but also stays true to the seasonal goodness packed with the wholloping punch of health-packing nutrients of any real Paleo recipe!

A trip to the farmer’s market on Ali’i Drive in downtown Kona2 was just the ticket. Freshly picked pineapple, Japanese sweet potato, sweet onion from Waimea, and locally grown basil were amongst the goodies I encountered. And, while a bit on the starchier and sweeter side than I’d recommend for day-to-day dining, in context of preparing for a long endurance event, absolutely perfect.

Hearty, tasty and ideal for preparing the body’s fuel stores for a day of intense physical activity to come, my Blue Sweet Potato and Pineapple ‘Poke’ is both easy to prepare and easy to enjoy.

Paleoista’s Blue Sweet Potato and Pineapple ‘Poke’

A play on the local island favorite, ‘Poke,’ is a raw salad served as an appetizer in Hawaiian cuisine. This recipe will fill your boots and ensure you’re ready to race or train hard!


  • 2 lbs boiled blue sweet potatoes, cubed into 1” pieces and cooled
  • 1 sweet onion, chopped
  • 1 small pineapple, cored, peeled and cut into 1” cubes
  • 1 small lime, juiced
  • ¼ cup coconut oil, melted
  • ½ cup freshly chopped basil, plus a few leaves for garnish


  1. Combine all ingredients in large bowl
  2. Stir to combine
  3. Chill for one hour before serving
  4. Garnish with basil leaves


1. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 07 Oct. 2015

2. http://www.konafarmersmarket.com

Paleo Sandwich | The Paleo Diet

What’s for lunch?  For at least 49% of the U.S., it’s a sandwich. The common sandwich components, such as yeasted grain breads, cheese, and cured meats, are among the top contributors not only to sodium (accounting for at least one-fifth of the total daily sodium intake), but also to excess caloric consumption in the diets of adult Americans.1 Fortunately, the Paleo diet avoids the sandwich components that are added sodium-rich and offer empty nutrients.

There’s no disputing that whether you are pack a lunchbox or grab a quick bite on your lunch hour, sandwiches are popular because they are quick-and-easy. Subscribing to the Paleo diet doesn’t mean you still can’t enjoy convenience or the flavor profiles offered at your favorite deli. Check out our ideas for ways to turn your pre-Paleo favorite into a new Paleo staple.

Let’s start on the outside and explore the options for keeping the contents of your sandwich together.  You can use any of these Paleo wrap ideas for a variety of classic fillings, such as Paleo chicken salad, ground bison burgers, or to reinvent last night’s leftover roast beef.

Leafy Greens

Large, flat green leaves make excellent wrappers for all kinds of fillings – such as tacos, burgers, or Asian-style lettuce cups. Collard greens can be lightly steamed so that a tight wrap can be made, while Swiss chard and romaine both work well in their raw form.

Grilled vegetable slabs

Portobello mushrooms, eggplant slices, and bell peppers can be grilled or lightly roasted to create a solid platform that supports the inside of your sandwich. Although, you may find that these are neater to eat with a fork and knife.

Cauliflower “Bread”

The Real Paleo Diet Cookbook has a recipe for Cauliflower Cups made using a muffin tin, this recipe can be transformed by baking as a flatbread in the oven on a parchment lined backing sheet.  It could be topped with roasted tomatoes and eggplant and a drizzle of olive oil and makes an impressive open-faced vegetable sandwich.

We have recreated many classic sandwich options below with the same hearty taste and flavors, but reinvented into healthy Paleo diet compliant versions.

The Paleo Nut Butter & Jelly

With or without the crust, peanut butter (a legume) is not part of the Paleo diet. Fortunately, other spreads, such as sunflower seed or almond butter, are available to layer between thinly sliced apples or pears to replicate the flavor and convenience of this kid-friendly staple.  Serve with a side of dehydrated beet chips.

The Paleo Chicken Parmesan

Combine grilled chicken thighs with your favorite dairy-free Paleo pesto, such as a puree of basil, kale, toasted pine nuts, and olive oil. Top with sun-dried tomatoes and sautéed shiitake mushrooms and set on a large romaine lettuce leaf for added crunch. Serve with crispy, oven roasted, thin slices of zucchini.

The Paleo Cuban Sandwich

There’s no Paleo substitute for cheese, but in our take of this traditional Latin dish you won’t miss it. Melt in your mouth warm, citrus marinated, grilled, pork shoulder butt (blade roast), combined with Paleo Dijon-style mustard, sliced cucumbers, shredded raw purple cabbage, and avocado served on butter lettuce leaves. Served with a side of homemade plantain chips cooked in coconut oil.

The Paleo Bánh mì

There’s a lot of variation with the type of protein used to make a Bánh mì. However, the key is to find the proper balance between the spice, crunch, and tang of this Vietnamese recipe. Start with Paleo mayo (recipe available in The Paleo Diet Cookbook), thinly sliced jalapeno pepper, cilantro, minced garlic, julienne carrots and cucumber, with roasted pork belly, and a smear of dairy-free chicken liver pâté. Tuck the ingredients onto a Belgian endive leaf.

The Paleo Turkey Sandwich

The best part of Thanksgiving is making a leftover turkey sandwich. Thinly slice the roasted breast meat, top with a dollop of tangy, homemade cranberry relish, and serve between two sweet potato pancakes. Serve with a side of roasted Brussels sprout chips.

What’s your favorite Paleo sandwich combination? Post ‘em below!


[1] Sebastian, Rhonda S., et al. “Sandwiches Are Major Contributors of Sodium in the Diets of American Adults: Results from What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 115.2 (2015): 272-277.

Ginger Tuna Ceviche

The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly the DHA and EPA varieties, are well documented and becoming well known.1 An estimated 17 percent of US adults consume fish oil supplements and since 2007, US fish oil sales have surged from $425 million to over $1 billion.2,3 While these figures are encouraging, more attention should be placed on omega-3 quality.

Because of their unique molecular structures, polyunsaturated fatty acids, including omega-3, are prone to oxidation.4 Heat, light, and oxygen can quickly degrade them, giving rise to harmful free radicals. Fish oil products vary considerably, but excessive oxidation is not uncommon.5

In general, whole fish provides better quality (less oxidized) omega-3 than extracted fish oils. Taking it one step further, raw fish provides better quality omega-3 than cooked fish. This doesn’t mean cooked fish is bad, but when raw fish opportunities present themselves, you shouldn’t hesitate. When your local supermarket has ultra-fresh tuna, mackerel, or wild salmon, for example, buy some and prepare a simple, delicious ceviche.

Ceviche hails from the coastal regions of Central and South America. Recipes vary, but most feature fresh fish, shrimp, squid, or other seafood marinated in citrus juices. Our recipe works for fatty fish and whitefish alike, but the kick of ginger pairs especially well with tuna. If you’re making ceviche with a stronger tasting fish like mackerel, you’ll want to add some diced onions and possibly forgo the ginger.


Serves 2-3

  • 1 pound fresh tuna, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 2-inch piece of ginger, grated
  • 1 loose handful fresh parsley leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 loose handful fresh cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 small mild chili, finely diced
  • 1 lime, juiced (or 2 small limes)
  • Olive oil (for drizzling)
  • Freshly ground black pepper


6item(s) « 1 of 6 »
Note: Supposing you’re preparing a takeaway lunch, you can contain the juices and olive oil in a Ziplock bag. Put all your chopped ingredients into a storage container and add the sealed Ziplock. Stir in the liquid ingredients when you’re ready to eat.

Thank you for reading,

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
Nutritional Grail


Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is a writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed book, Nutritional Grail.


1. Swanson, D., Block, R., & Mousa, S. A. (2012). Omega-3 Fatty Acids EPA and DHA: Health Benefits Throughout Life. Advances in Nutrition, 3(1), 1-7. doi:10.3945/an.111.000893

2. American Oil Chemists’ Society (AOCS). Omega-3 fatty acids: $13 billion global market. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from http://www.aocs.org/Membership/FreeCover.cfm?itemnumber=17629

3. Doyle, K. (2013, December 16). Fish oil sales don’t reflect evidence. Reuters. Retrieved June 6, 2014 from http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/12/16/us-fish-oil-sales-dont-reflect-evidence-idUSBRE9BF1DH20131216

4. Albert, B., Cameron-Smith, D., Hofman, P. L., & Cutfield, W. S. (2013). Oxidation of Marine Omega-3 Supplements and Human Health. BioMed Research International. (2013). Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/464921

5. Halvorsen, B. L. & Blomhoff, R. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements. Food & Nutrition Research, 55, doi:10.3402/fnr.v55i0.5792

Calamari Salad | The Paleo Diet

We came across a delicious summer recipe on the back of a package of cooked, sliced calamari. With just a few modifications, we were able to substitute the necessary ingredients to make it pure Paleo. Calamari Salad is the perfect fresh dish to share on a warm evening with friends!


Serves 4

  • 1 lb wild-caught sliced squid tentacles, precooked
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. white vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 sliced red or yellow pepper
  • 4 cups mixed green lettuce
  • 1 bunch cilantro leaves
  • 10 low sodium olives of your choice, rinsed and sliced
  • 1 fresh avocado
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • 2 large tomatoes


1. Combine calamari with olive oil, one teaspoon white vinegar and sliced pepper and set aside in serving bowl.

2. Toss together mixed greens and cilantro and spread evenly on large serving platter.

3. Add remaining ingredients to lettuce mixture.

4. When ready to eat, scoop squid mixture onto greens and toss together.

All the Best,

Lorrie Cordain, M.Ed., Co-Author of The Paleo Diet Cookbook

Have a recipe favorite you’ve modified? Share it with us in comments!

The Paleo Diet Recipe Library

Portobello Mushrooms | The Paleo Diet

We love to create new ways to prepare chicken, one of the more versatile meats enjoyed by Paleo Dieters. Chicken breasts with portobello mushrooms in white wine has recently become a favorite for its ease of preparation and the incredible flavor that comes from the infusion of just a few simple ingredients.


Serves 3-4

  • 4 free range organic chicken breast fillets, rinsed thoroughly
  • 2 cups organic, portobello mushrooms, rinsed and sliced
  • 1 cup organic marsala wine (don’t use cooking wine as it contains added salt)
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary, removed from stems
  • 1 small sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Freshly cracked pepper to taste


1. Preheat oven to 375°

2. Place chicken breasts in baking dish and cover with mushrooms.

3. In a mixing bowl, combine wine, 3 tbsp extra virgin oil, red wine vinegar, and rosemary.

4. Saute onion and garlic with 1 tbsp extra olive oil in shallow pan until onions are tender.

5. Spread onions and garlic over chicken and mushrooms.

6. Pour liquid mixture over chicken making sure all pieces are well coated.

7. Bake for 45 minutes or until chicken is cooked.

The Paleo Diet Recipe Library

Easy Baked Kale Chips | The Paleo Diet

Kale is often touted to be one of the healthiest vegetables on the planet. It belongs to the Brassica family which includes cabbage, collard greens, and broccoli. Kale’s nutrient profile is outstanding when it comes to the antioxidant Vitamins A, C, and K. In fact, 1 cup of kale will supply your body with the 1180.1% of the %DV requirement for Vitamin K. It also has many sulfur-containing phytonutrients. When compared to all other vegetables Kale ranks superior in antioxidant concentrations.

If you’re following Paleo, consider incorporating this nutritious vegetable in your diet. Where to start with this leafy green? Give our baked kale chips a try – an easy baked, delicious snack to keep your hunger at bay.


Serves 3-4

  • 3-4 large leaves of kale (preferably organic)
  • 1 Tbsp Coconut or olive oil
  • Favorite Paleo spice medley


1. Preheat oven to 350° F.

2. Rinse kale leaves and shred each leaf into chip-sized pieces, discarding the center stem.

3. In a Tupperware container, add coconut or olive oil and Paleo spices. I personally prefer sage, basil, red pepper flakes, black pepper, and oregano or thyme.

4. Seal container and toss ingredients until all leaves are fully coated.

5. Spread seasoned kale leaves on a non-stick cooking sheet. Make sure that each leaf is completely opened and not crumpled to ensure even cooking.

6. Place the kale chips in the oven and bake for 12 minutes or until crisp around the edges.

7. Remove the kale chips from your oven and place them in a bowl or plate to cool.

8. Enjoy!


Kyle Cordain, The Paleo Diet Team

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