Tag Archives: mint

Ultimate Antioxidant Paleo Breakfast Bowl

August 3 – 9 marks the USDA’s 15th Annual National Farmers Market Week. With over 7,800 farmers markets, (up 67% since 2008!1), shopping and supporting local is not only encouraged, but also nutritious. Expect to find ultra-fresh vegetables, unique heirloom varieties, and farmers committed to quality, organic foods.

While we support organic agriculture, we acknowledge its limitations and complications. A 2012 Stanford study concluded organic foods are not significantly more nutritious than conventional foods, but may contain fewer pesticides.2 Some organic producers use natural pesticides, but their use isn’t necessarily “healthier.”3, 4 Surely there are healthful benefits to consuming organic, right? A recent study published in the British Medical Journal concluded organic foods are significantly higher in antioxidants and lower in pesticide residues.5

At farmers markets, you can speak directly with farmers and understand their philosophies regarding pesticides. Sometimes you’ll meet farmers committed to minimizing pesticides, natural or otherwise, and others whose products aren’t necessarily USDA Certified Organic, but nevertheless are high quality.

The following recipe features many antioxidant powerhouses, including cloves, the number one dietary source of polyphenols (the most common type of antioxidant).6 Yes, you can eat cloves! Soften them and they’re delicious. Berries, plums, almonds, mint (especially peppermint), and cacao are also exceptionally potent sources of antioxidants.7

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 handful of blueberries
  • 1 handful of raspberries
  • 2 or 3 small plums
  • ¾ cup almonds, soaked overnight
  • 15 to 20 cloves
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 20 mint leaves
  • 1 – 2 tbsp raw cacao (100% cacao, unsweetened)

DIRECTIONS

clark-breakfast-bowl4
Ingredients
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Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

references

1. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=KYF_MISSION

2. Smith-Spangler, C., et al. (September 4, 2012). Are organic foods safer or healthier than conventional alternatives? A Systematic Review. Annals of Internal Medicine, 157(3). Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22944875

3. Wilcox, Christie. (July 18, 2011). Mythbusting 101: Organic Farming > Conventional Agriculture. Scientific American. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/07/18/mythbusting-101-organic-farming-conventional-agriculture/

4. Wilcox, Christie. (August 15, 2011). In the immortal words of Tom Petty: “I won’t back down.” Scientific American. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/08/15/organic_myths_revisited/

5. Baranski, M., et al. (July, 2014). Higher antioxidant and lower cadmium concentrations and lower incidence of pesticide residues in organically grown crops: a systematic literature review and meta-analyses. British Medical Journal, 26(1-18). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24968103

6. Pérez-Jiménez, J., Neveu, V., Vos, F., and Scalbert, A. (November 2010). Identification of the 100 richest dietary sources of polyphenols: an application of the Phenol-Explorer database. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(Suppl. 3). Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n3s/fig_tab/ejcn2010221t1.html#figure-title

7. Ibid.

All Day Energy Cherry Mint Turkey Balls

Turkey is a great source of protein and high-quality fat. Paired with steamed vegetables or a fresh, garden salad, our Cherry Mint Turkey Balls offer enticing flavors and clean-burning, all day energy.

Wait a second. Doesn’t eating turkey induce sleepiness? This urban legend, most likely inspired by our inclination for napping after Thanksgiving meals, actually has nothing to do with turkey, and much more to do with overeating.

If you’d like to impress your friends with your knowledge of amusing, overly technical scientific jargon, the scientific term for food-induced drowsiness is postprandial somnolence. You might try informing your boss some day that you’ll be away from your desk while you sort out some postprandial somnolence issues. If you say it with enough confidence, it just might work.

Turkey contains tryptophan, an essential amino acid that is the precursor to serotonin and melatonin (by way of serotonin), the neurotransmitters that regulate sleep.1 However, turkey isn’t any higher in tryptophan compared to related foods.

25 g of turkey protein contain 284 mg of tryptophan. You would consume 25 grams of protein from a serving of meat weighing between 100 and 150 grams. Leaner cuts have more protein; more fatty cuts have less. 25 g of beef, lamb, pork, and chicken protein contain 280 mg, 292 mg, 318 mg, and 292 mg of tryptophan, respectively.2 In other words, all types of meat have very similar tryptophan levels.

Interestingly, research shows that high-carbohydrate meals increase serum tryptophan concentrations, whereas meals of protein plus fat have the opposite effect.3 So be careful. If your boss knows you’re eating Paleo, he/she might also know your postprandial somnolence issues are completely unfounded.

INGREDIENTS

Serves 2-4

  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1 bundle fresh mint, finely chopped
  • 1 bundle fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup dried cherries, pitted, finely chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

  • Chop the cherries finely.
  • Wash and spin-dry the herbs before chopping them finely.
  • Break the eggs into a bowl and mix well.
  • Put all the ingredients into a mixing bowl and, using your hands, mix everything together.
  • Form mixture into balls and place on a baking sheet.
  • Bake at 350°F for about 20 minutes or until the balls are lightly browned.
mint-turkey
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Note: You can substitute dried cherries for dried cranberries or other dried fruits. Be sure to read the product labels. Commercially sold dried fruits often contain added sugar, vegetable oils, sulfur dioxide, and other ingredients that should be avoided on a Paleo Diet.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.
@nutrigrail
Nutritional Grail
www.ChristopherJamesClark.com

Christopher James Clark | The Paleo Diet TeamChristopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

See more recipes!

references

1. Woolf, P. & Lee, L. (July 1, 1977). Effect of the Serotonin Precursor, Tryptophan, on Pituitary Hormone Secretion. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 45(1). Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jcem-45-1-123

2. Nutrition Data. All figures retrieved July 4, 2014 from http://nutritiondata.self.com

3. Lyons, PM. & Truswell, AS. (March 1988). Serotonin precursor influenced by type of carbohydrate meal in healthy adults. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 47(3), (433-439). Retrieved from http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/47/3/433.short

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