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Paleo Diet Recipes: True Paleo or Not?

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Recipes

Gluten-Free Paleo Diet Recipes | Gluten Free Living

Rosemary Orange Duck with Roasted Vegetables

Here’s a great recipe for the holidays. It’s a perfect dish to cook all afternoon with family or friends gathered at your house while the scent of rosemary slowly spreads from room to room. The concept is simple and straightforward. We’re just stuffing a duck with orange pieces and rosemary and adding some root vegetables to the roasting pan. The flavors from the duck mix with the orange and rosemary to flavor the meat and the vegetables. Normally you’ll end up buying the duck frozen. So if that’s the case, make sure it’s fully defrosted before you start cooking. Ideally

Real Paleo Fast & Easy (2015)

It’s finally here, the perfect Paleo cookbook for lifestyles on the go! 170 delicious recipes you can prepare and enjoy in 30 minutes or less. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., creator of The Paleo Diet, understands that we live busy lives, but he also knows this is no reason to sacrifice good health; a great dinner that follows The Paleo Diet is only 30 minutes away with this innovative cookbook. The book has a range of speedy meals, from flash-roasted fish to microwave peach chutney for pork chops. There are soups, skillet meals, fresh dinner salads, and more. The 170 recipes and

Paleo Challenges During the Holidays

The season of celebration, gift-giving, and tradition is upon us. Along with all of the fun and festivities, the Paleo dieter is faced with the challenges of maintaining a healthy lifestyle while sorting through the endless sea of desserts, sweets, and holiday treats offered on a daily basis.

A Paleo-Approved Halloween for Kids

Boo! Halloween doesn’t disguise itself. This holiday is clearly all about candy, costumes, and community. The last two are certainly positive and Paleo lifestyle approved, allowing children to use their imaginations, while fostering connections with our neighbors, with the added benefit of everyone getting outside to walk around for a few hours. Halloween doesn’t have to be all about candy, even if you want to indulge in some sweets for the night, there’s an opportunity to take Halloween to the next level, Paleo Diet style. Instead of being known as the house who hands out the biggest and most amazing

Paleo Fusion: Hawaiian Blue Sweet Potato and Pineapple ‘Poke’

Hawaiian cuisine incorporates five distinct styles of food reflecting the diverse food history of settlement and immigration in the islands.1 Polynesian voyagers brought plants and animals to the islands, contributing to the local fish, taro (which were raised for poi), coconuts, sugarcane, sweet potatoes and yams, and meat, cooked in earth ovens. Later, large plantations developed with the arrival of Europeans, Americans, missionaries, and whalers who introduced cuisine native to their homelands to Hawaii. In the late 1800s, migrant workers from China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines, and Portugal immigrated to meet the growing labor needs of the pineapple industry in

New Studies on Salt: Adverse Influence Upon Immunity, Inflammation and Autoimmunity

INTRODUCTION The Paleo community clearly is not in complete agreement on all dietary issues. One of the more touchy topics is added dietary salt.  A number of popular (non-scientific/non-peer review) bloggers advocate the use of refined salt or various forms of sea salt added to recipes and meals.1 Highly salted meats such as bacon are wildly popular in the Paleosphere.2 Other concentrated, salty foods such as cheese, olives, canned sardines, tuna, anchovies, caviar, salted nuts, manufactured jerky, canned tomato paste, and other salted, processed foods frequently find their way into so-called Paleo diets. You will be hard pressed to find

Dramatic Weight Gains Caused by Modern American Diet (MAD)

According to the CDC, the average US woman now weighs 166.2 lbs and the average US man weighs 195.5 lbs.1 As reported in the Washington Times, this means the average woman today weighs as much as the average man did during the early 1960s.2 Overall, women are 18.5% heavier than they were in the early 1960s and men are 17.6% heavier. Part of these weight gains can be attributed to height; both the average man and woman are approximately one inch taller today compared to the early 1960s. The majority of the weight gains, however, come from increased body fat,